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Jeremy Newton
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
176/15/20083/9/20172
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13011200
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.81663

with Jeff Chen comments

See the answer words debuted by Jeremy Newton.


17 puzzles by Jeremy Newton

Thu 3/9/2017
PSASMAVJAMS
CIARAAVEOPALS
HEFTYGIGGETIT
ACESMIDASDECO
REFNICNHLFEM
TOOREALPHOTOOP
FRETALIWORF
WWWWMIZLLLL
PEZ
BBCNEWSASYOUDO
AROUSECURSED
WORKLIFEBALANCE
LONEGOGOLLAOS
EKEDHUGMEBVDS
DEASLOBSYEA

Neat idea, to have WORK and LIFE balanced … on sets of black squares that look like balances! Along with WORK LIFE BALANCE (conveniently 15 letters long; a constructor's dream), plus WEIGHS and SCALES, it made for a pretty picture.

Jeremy is so good with his gridwork. One of his sticks in my mind as a favorite Sunday, partially because it required such incredible craftsmanship in incredibly jam-packed regions. Similar requirement in today's puzzle, what with so many down answers needing to work with each other on both sides of the scales.

Take the left side, for example. Not only do PIECE OF WORK, SAFE FOR WORK, REWORK, and NETWORK have to work (pun intended) together through TOO REAL and FRET, but PIECE OF WORK and SAFE FOR WORK have to coordinate all the way up to the top. So many constraints to work around.

The result is nice and smooth, although I did hitch on TOO REAL, wondering if it needs to be (ALL) TOO REAL. And I've seen NSFW plenty, but never SFW. In the end, both did seem passable, though.

Interesting long fill elsewhere in the grid, too. I particularly enjoyed MAGIC LAMPS, PHOTO OP, and BBC NEWS, especially what with that crazy-looking BBCN* four-consonant start.

VEGAN PIZZA … I wondered about that. It is a real thing, but I worry that it opens the door for the arbitrary VEGAN BURGER, VEGAN SANDWICH, VEGAN POT PIE, etc. And AS YOU DO sounded out of tune to my ear. (Maybe because I'm not a Brit.)

It did feel repetitive to have WORK and LIFE and then WORK LIFE BALANCE. Plus, the .puz file was coded with rebus squares of (WORK)(WORK)(WORK)(WORK) and (LIFE)(LIFE)(LIFE)(LIFE), whereas I really wanted them to just be W O R K and L I F E. The grid and answers (below) are adjusted to the non-rebus approach, which I think is more elegant.

Interesting visual concept, along with some great execution, given the dauntingly dense theme-packing.

POW Sun 9/18/2016MAKE A DASH FOR IT
TPSCDSPOSTEDSUB
HUTTREATYESCHEWWHO
ESEHONCHOPHOENIXADZ
WHEREASEDSAUFITOO
BDLISTERPACKREDFISH
UGLIRIORIMNOR
YPRESGDRATEDCHEESE
EBAYWHIPUPRUEEVADE
PRYTIEDONSINSWIVES
ASSISIWEANSLINENS
AMERICANGOTHIDC
MEWLEDTOYOUAFFECT
ARIALISMSAVANTIRAW
GITMOMOIBRINGSTOKE
CHICKENCODOPSTOPED
KOASOBLOXORCS
CHASINGMOVINGADSIDE
FLABTUTYINANDORRA
LODCALHEROSEEMTOCUT
ASHWEASELASSESSLGA
PEAWETTEDPSYEST

★ It's been seven years of constructing, and I've only now started to realize how difficult it is to create a captivating Sunday 140-word puzzle. Part of it is the sheer difficulty of adhering to Will's limit of at most 140 words — WAY harder than some other editors' 144 max — but a bigger part is coming up with a concept that holds solvers' attention through a 21x21 grid. This gets even tougher when considering how varied the NYT's solving population is.

Personally, I often don't enjoy the Sunday puzzle as much as I would like — I often get tired of it halfway through or even sooner. And I have very high expectations for Jeremy — I think he's one of the greats when it comes to Sunday puzzles — so I was honestly a little disappointed to figure out that this was "just" a theme including the dashes inside entries like UH-OH and PUSH-UP BRA. Felt like I had seen similar punctuation-related themes before (2015, 2013, 2007.)

Great a-ha moment to discover that wait, there was more! Took me over half of the puzzle to finally realize that Jeremy had replaced some regular words with hyphenated phrases — PHOENIX, AZ going to PHOENIX A-Z was so amusing. And each themer using an interesting word-to-hyphenated-word substitution helped hold my attention. My favorite was AMERICAN GOT HI-C for its unusual breaking of GOTHIC into GOT HI-C, plus the amusing result.

Jeremy is so good with his long fill. There wasn't as much as we usually see from him — CROP CIRCLE, TIME LOCKS, and VIP LINES the standouts — but there's a reason for that. Any time you have to work with crossing entries, a grid quickly becomes tough to fill. He could have gotten away with relying on short dashed fill like UH-OH and HA-HA everywhere, but I love how he pushed himself to work in THE PO-PO (slang for the police), FREE WI-FI, and PUSH-UP BRA. Doesn't leave much room for long fill throughout the grid, but when all your theme material is this good, that doesn't matter very much.

Really tough to hold my attention all the way through a Sunday puzzle. Big thanks to Jeremy for this one that greatly succeeded!

Wed 1/13/2016
SARISSKAGUCCI
CHINASHOPOSRIC
ROCKYHOARABATE
AMISAWSOWZIT
PENNAMESNOSY
CLERICALHEIR
TABOODUIHYDE
ICUTHREERSELI
EMMAOATOGDEN
REARVIEWMERE
SKISOUTCLASS
POMETASHETCU
ADOLFSHEERTEAR
TOKYOISUREWILL
SNEERATMRANDY

Sound change theme, two-syllable words ending in -RROR getting their last syllable dropped, and the first syllable replaced with a real-word homonym. Complicated! I liked that all of the final words had a replacement that made me work to figure out the base phrase (ROCKY HORROR, CLERICAL ERROR, REARVIEW MIRROR, SHEER TERROR).

Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" from "Orange is the New Black"

REARVIEW MERE felt like the weakest of the bunch, as I kept on staring at the word MERE, wondering what I was missing. (The dictionary lists "a small lake or pond" as a secondary definition of MERE. Curious.) I wonder how many solvers actually looked it up vs. shrugging and moving on.

I like that Jeremy used a complete set — can you think of any other words ending in -RROR? — and all four sound changes worked in exactly the same way. Such completeness is so elegant. It would have been perfect if MERE had been a more common noun, but what can you do.

I'm mixed on THREE RS as a revealer. What about the poor O in -RROR? The THREE RS just doesn't seem to describe what's happening very well. I think I would have preferred to do without it.

Speaking of doing without, ADOLF next to SHEER (terror). Yikes.

Jeremy always does such a nice job with his long fill, and he goes big today, working in an astounding eight (!) pieces of long fill as well as some mid-length stuff. Very few constructors would tackle such a task, and cramming in CHINA SHOP, PEN NAMES and SAYS A LOT into a corner which already has a theme answer is a bold move. I don't like the long partial A HOME, but APRS and AMI are minor.

The CRAZY EYED corner is easier, with just one long piece of fill, but working in the bonus of GO AWOL makes it tricky as well. Again, Jeremy executes well on it.

And some beautiful pieces of languages in BUM A SMOKE and I SURE WILL. Jeremy is such a star at working great long fill into his puzzles.

Although some aspects of the theme execution didn't quite work for me, I still really enjoyed this one.

Sun 10/4/2015SOUND ARGUMENT
TATARAITTFIRJLO
IVANDODDERETOBLUES
FICKLETHERAPISTRAJAH
FATHOMDANCINGCUISINE
ISNOTSEETONESTEA
NYCARCSOLISSS
BEAASABEAVERDECKOUT
CALLONIFEVERTEED
BUYONEGETONEFRIZZY
SNONAHLAMERPLEAS
CODEDHARKPOORLEDGE
ABORCELENAICUSSR
MURRAYLOVESCOMPANY
ORELSATIVASKOKIE
PARDONSDIGUPDESSERT
YENMOATMSUNEA
ETALIATWISTISTOO
AUTUMNSPECTRUMHAGGLE
SNOREAREYOUFORISRAEL
TIMEDWETREOPENEMIL
YAYSPYESSEXSEAS

A ton of theme material packed in today — eight long ones plus the symmetrical IS NOT / IS TOO revealer. It got a little confusing to me, including a few I had to really think about, so here's a listing in order:

Add or Subtract "IS"? Themer Base Phrase
Subtract FICKLE THERAPIST PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Add DANCING CUISINE DANCING QUEEN
Subtract BEA AS A BEAVER BUSY AS A BEAVER
Add BUY ONE GET ONE FRIZZY BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
Subtract MURRAY LOVES COMPANY MISERY LOVES COMPANY
Add DIG UP DESSERT DIG UP DIRT
Subtract AUTUMN SPECTRUM AUTISM SPECTRUM
Add ARE YOU FOR ISRAEL ARE YOU FOR REAL

I really liked DANCING CUISINE, a crazy sound addition from DANCING QUEEN. FICKLE THERAPIST was my second favorite, as it took me forever to figure out that it subtracted the sound of IS from PHYSICAL THERAPIST. Neat how every one of the eight themers utilizes a huge spelling change, not just adding/subtracting the letters IS.

ABBA's "Dancing Queen"

It's hard to pack in eight themers, and really hard to pack in eight long ones. Check out the pairs of themers, either directly stacked or just one row apart — that's crazy hard to do with so many pairs. I'm not used to seeing the smattering of glue like SSR, SSS, YSER, A B OR C from Jeremy, but it's understandable given how difficult it is to pack this much theme in.

Overall, I would have liked to separate the IS NOTs to the top half, and the IS TOOs to the bottom. The word transmogrifications were hard enough to figure out that I couldn't keep straight which themer was *starred and which was **double-starred. Additionally, some of the sound changes felt a bit strained to me. MISERY to MURRAY for example — the UR sound in MURRAY doesn't really match the ER sound in MISERY.

Finally, Jeremy is so good with his fresh fill that I might have preferred just three themers of each type in order to get more of the KERPLUNKS and OH HELL NO kind of material.

Some neat themers though, and an entertaining solve.

POW Sun 6/28/2015GETTING IN THE FINAL WORD
UNJAMGLOBEREVLOKI
CAUSEAHMADAVEMINED
LASERNAGNAGNAGINTEL
ANTACIDSMAUNAGOAPE
WHATHAPPENSSRIS
BONSAIHUMESSTSINT
DEPOTSCOMEDICYODOG
AMITEMIRCEDETO
YOUVEGOTAFRIENDSEWN
BAMPREYRIVETERTROT
ENDUSESILOSETHICS
DEEMSAMPLERMONATHE
DNASCOULDYOUPUTTHAT
METEORWITTHINS
CAIROSTPETERPOUNCE
PADBACHAMATGEORGE
ELMODOUBLEDOVER
SLICKSPAINECLECTIC
TITHETOWNDRUNKLAURA
ONIONARDERATOAMBER
SGTSSKYDRESSLEAST

★ I thought more about why I like Jeremy's puzzles so much. Part of it is he just seems like a good guy — it's been amusing trying to get him to stop calling me "sir" — but mostly, I love his creativity even as he sticks to the "one square, one letter" rule. Trying to innovate while keeping a single letter in a single square is incredibly difficult.

What happens in Vegas ...

Jeremy does it again today, executing brilliantly on an idea the likes of which I can't remember. He takes snazzy phrases where the second to last word is IN, and uses a crossing to imply that "in." WHAT HAPPENS (IN) VEGAS … for example.

But wait, there's more! He finds crossings so that the final word forms another valid word in its crossing. For this example, VEGAS becomes VEGA(N)S, obfuscating the theme. Very cool to see these entries which can read as two completely normal words. Even though there are thousands of X IN Y phrases, it couldn't have been easy to find a set that displayed crossword symmetry AND had this property of the Y word intersecting the X so that it formed a different, regular word.

And Jeremy has a knack for colorful phrases, the likes of which I identify with only a handful of themeless constructors like Josh Knapp and Peter Wentz. The best constructors are always on the lookout for punchy phrases that can add zest to a puzzle, like TOWN DRUNK. Even YO DOG works in that regard. Check out Jeremy's older puzzles to get a sense of how much great vocabulary he's introduced.

Now, just as with any puzzle, I didn't find it perfect. To me, the phrases would have been more apt if they had been X THROUGH Y instead of X IN Y. But that's minor; a tiny speed bump.

Finally, two standout clues:

  • [Guard at a gated community?] = ST PETER. I'm going to have some questions to answer at that gate.
  • [Green dwarf] had to be one of those _STAR kind of filler entries, right? D'oh, it refers to a tiny BONSAI.

Another extremely well-executed Sunday puzzle from Jeremy. I tip my hat to you, sir.

POW Sun 3/22/2015UPSIDES
WBALEFLAPHAMTVDAD
AINEDROSAACEBRAISE
RONGDRINKSSHAREONESB
TLEOIIGATAENEIDDAU
SAXEDGINESSTINYOUT
BEADEDCLIMBINGOWL
SSTAREMOOTTMNT
TANYAPOKYNCAA
TOSELFPHONECOLDMEAL
EVENALITTLEBOREAVAI
TAXSTRUMSMAMMALANV
ORTHEARLTASMANIANDE
NYSENATESICKOLESSER
LAMEBCCSNSYNC
ODESMORKASHACT
URNTHEWALLSOOMPAH
FTEAOAFPEACHPIERED
ALSPOLISHPRULEGALI
CISIONTREEDIGESTIVEA
ENUDESSRAOBEYUNAFR
DEPOTTAPGEREPANTY

★ As a crossword commentator, I live for days like today. I initially was disgruntled by (what I thought were) gibberish rebus squares all along the walls of the puzzle. On my average solver days, I would have set it aside without another thought.

Thank goodness I analyzed it afterward, because what an amazing a-ha moment! It's my favorite puzzle of the year in any venue so far, and I hope to convince any haters out there why it's so incredible. I struggle to think of a single puzzle in the past several years that I've liked better.

Like me, there will be many solvers out there who entered "STRAW" in the first square, "STRA" in the one below it, "STR" in the one below that, etc. Made no sense why [Targets of some cryosurgery] was a bunch of nonsense rebus squares. It took me a couple of minutes to realize that each of these answers is literally CLIMBING / THE WALLS, i.e. the STRAW of STRAW BALE actually starts at the square marked "30"! Similarly, that square starts the STRA of STRAINED, and the STR of STRONG DRINKS, all "borrowing" from the WARTS entry.

Deal with the devil. J'accuse!

Sometimes a puzzle is awesome from a solver's perspective, sometime it's incredible from a constructor's view, but rarely do I find both in spades. The aspect I appreciate the most as a constructor is that Jeremy found a way to innovate without relying on rebus squares — squishing multiple letters into a single square in different ways. Jeremy's approach of using a "turning answers" approach to the nth degree is amazing, all while sticking with a single letter in each box.

And the technical challenge of it! Sure, each of the six instances is somewhat separated so he could build each one independently, but he still needed to stick to crossword symmetry. To balance STRONG DRINKS with DIGESTIVE AID, and NOT EVEN A LITTLE with TASMANIAN DEVIL … I did figure out how to arrange things to get some computer assistance, but it's still a wickedly difficult task to pull off so cleanly.

As if all that weren't enough, Jeremy keeps at it with great mid-length fill like ME FIRST, SCRAP HEAP, HAS A SMOKE, etc. Pure RAPTURE on my part.

I can't remember when I've been this elated to have the chance to gush about a crossword. I've always looked forward to seeing Jeremy's byline, and this enforces my notion that he's one of the best in the business.

Sun 2/8/2015MULTIFACETED
TIMESLITICETCBER
SHIERPASSINGGOSHERA
GARNERATTENTIONWEARY
AVAPURETKOSEXIER
RECKONSOSEWNDISSING
PILETINTEDCRUISESBY
TEENTSASOUPETHAN
PONYEXPRESSSSR
SLOMOTROOPHAIARS
MEANSTOASSNELLYETI
LTDGAMETHESYSTEMVOL
KILLFREETCMINAFUNK
NEEAILSTOPSTRIPE
ANNPOPAWHEELIE
OBESEBONAOTTESPY
WATERGATEJUSTASTOUR
SHOTFORDCUPLIPBALMS
NOGOODUNSELALEMT
AEIOUQUARTERSIZEHAIL
PRAWNULULATIONWAXEN
PENNELKSSONGMERE

Jeremy goes one step further than the standard "words hidden in themers" puzzle type, by incorporating SET IN / STONE for an additional layer of complexity. I appreciated the puzzle even more after finishing, thinking about what a difficult time he must have had in finding strong themers which 1.) contained precious stones 2.) broke those stones into exactly two parts, and 3.) had to have an "E" in between those two parts.

That's a huge number of constraints, so to find such entries as strong as PONY EXPRESS, GAME THE SYSTEM, and POP A WHEELIE is really impressive. And Jeremy could have chosen short *SET* answers (like ASSET, SETI, etc.) to make things easier, so getting CHEESE TRAY and LEASE TO OWN in those difficult spots is much appreciated.

The Nerf N-Strike Vulcan EBF-25 — yikes!

Just in case the theme concept isn't totally clear yet, I highlighted the SETs "in stone" below. With the tremendous number of constraints this condition placed upon the grid, it's a wonder that Jeremy was able to fill it so well, even tossing in some goodies like RECKON SO, NERF GUN, and the Wheel of Fortune sequence RSTLN E (the free letters in the bonus round).

A couple of clues to point out:

  • [Facetious string?] — "facetious" contains AEIOU in sequence.
  • Did you think [You may put stock in it] had something to do with faith or trust? No SOUP for you!
  • [One connected with the force?] teases us poor Star Wars dorks, "the force" referring to a police force.

Overall, I like the push to do something new, Jeremy taking an established theme type and giving it an additional layer of complexity.

Sun 3/16/2014IT'S BETTER THIS WAY
SICKOFBRAILLEWAFTS
ELAINERESCUEMEIMOUT
XERXESIOFPERSIANOLTE
TSPSSNRESSWELLUP
FOURXFOURSTEREO
BURLAPERNROWDYWAG
AGUASSHAYLOBESMIEN
THEWINTERXGAMESLONGU
SEALOTCTHINGIS
MPGOSLOBEOFOMITS
GROUCHOMARXMUSTACHE
METROSILOSLAWAES
RLSTINENIKLBAR
SICEMPROFESSORXAVIER
TORNSHOUTACNERSVPD
UNIBLESSHITGEISHA
POORMESOLVEFORX
ENTHUSESPAXTCBAA
DEIGNRETURNOFDOCTORX
AHOOTADAMSALELOONIE
MINDYSTEEPEDDOWELL
Today's author, Jeremy Newton, wrote one of my favorite puzzles in recent memory, one around Beethoven's Ode to Joy. This puzzles marks his tenth puzzle for the NYT, qualifying him for our "Most Prolific Authors" page.

Today's theme is explained by FOLLOWING THE / PRESCRIPTION, i.e. phrases containing the relatively rare RX pattern, hardly ever seen outside the MARX brothers and MARXISM. The phrase itself feels a little questionable, FILLING A PRESCRIPTION sounding better to my ear. I'm also not convinced that FOLLOWING THE PRESCRIPTION is that accurate of a revealer, as I would interpret that as "phrases that follow the RX letter sequence." Maybe I'm missing something?

ADDED NOTE: indeed, I totally missed a clever additional layer to the theme. I've highlighted the RXs in blue, so you can see their travel from SICK all the way to WELL down a diagonal path. Very cool! I'm really glad to have read Jeremy's note so I can appreciate the puzzle fully. Neat!

Jeremy sure picked some nice themers. I've been a huge X-Men fan for all my life (if you don't know what material Wolverine's skeleton is made of, I shall scoff at you), so seeing PROFESSOR XAVIER was pretty neat. SOLVE FOR X is also snappy, a beautiful phrase for us math dorks. Overall, X is such an infrequently used letter, it was neat to see so many instances of it strewn about the grid.

Not that records matter much (I think the solver's experience should be paramount above all else), but Jeremy gets up there in terms of number of X's. If you're interested, you might be interested to peruse all the record-setting letter counts for the Shortz era.

A bit of crunchy fill today in RSTU, ARIL, SPUME, etc. which made it a very tough solve for me. But one thing I'd like to point out is Jeremy's excellent usage of moderate-length fill. Check out the great colloquial 7's: MGM LION, GO BROKE, SWELL UP, ROM-COMS, and my favorite, THING IS... What fantastic use of usually boring 7's! And the 6's, even more difficult: HOT WAX, POOR ME, FESS UP!, FULL ON. GO COLD. I know some solvers much prefer a super-clean solve (no EPH, RES, ERN, etc.) without a great deal of snazz, but I appreciate the trade-off Jeremy gave us today. So much goodness in that mid-length fill.

Wish I had been more clever and picked up all the theme layers on my own! I blame the post-ACPT blues. Hurry up and get here already, ACPT 2015!

Sun 11/13/2011EITHER WAY
NORMANSSGTASPOBJ
OVERLAYDUOSBORNMAO
PUPILSSLIPUPBLOOPERS
EMOSTAMENBEACHBABE
ADAPERSEUSSUESREP
WANTOUTBAITTRAATH
EQUIPAUPAIROYERS
BUTTRESSEDDESSERTTUB
BASLENZAHAURLS
LIBRASUBPARRAPBUS
ELTOROAUNTSARISEN
WARSAWWASRAWLASED
EPEEHITDENTUFO
DEROGATIVEEVITAGORED
SPOTSEXTRASAWGEE
UMAUPAPAPAYESLETS
GIGOLOSSOLOGIGRPS
SCENESHOPSENTRATWA
ORIENTALXERXESSEXREX
MOSTAMEITESVENTURE
ESTLESSOSPROCEED
Sun 5/29/2011YOU'LL GET THROUGH THIS
QUAKERSRINGBELLSSFPD
ENVELOPIRAEINOILTRUE
DEADASANAILPOWERLOCK
SLAYDIVAENCE
SCHSETCALCOTIS
AREEARNERORURAL
BOAPREYERATOUSNA
ESTACDCOUTGAMESSTEM
RTESLSTCROSTINESEXY
SIDEATALOSSESTDRPTS
ANILMAXIMAS
WINAPRIZEPRISMWANE
HOLDTHEOPEN
BOPSNADAATISSUEEPIC
ALOTAVERTJOETNTSEGA
CLOYVANCEJEDITISAHS
KALEALOHAMENURBI
HOTELMANEDGETON
DORMONEDAMOORG
RHEAROBSASEA
ABCDOZAWATRAPSPIDERS
FOURSEDANHAIRHARDHIT
TYRESEEYAALLYEMERSON
Tue 3/15/2011
MRTDELTSMIMI
YESOMAHARANAT
BEETHOVENESPYS
ACTVODETOJOY
DESPISEEVENS
EGGONDALI
VHFOFNOLTCOL
EELSTELLYEEKS
TRYITDOWDADD
CRAMCCUPS
SEEDYHAZIEST
INCMAJORCLAY
DOUBTPIANOKEYS
ORZOSINLAWSHO
LAZYAGAMESIN
Sun 11/28/2010A SHINING MOMENT
GETSANAIDAHOSTRINGS
ACHEFORSEVERTOOSOON
BLEATEDALLOREDINCARGO
SAWENOLAMHOERIKWOW
TEARDROPOIOVISCERAL
DRTSOFTCOLORFEY
SUNCHIPSOEIROASSESSAS
NNEAFRAIDGRETELPGA
ABSENCEOAUCTIOALLERGY
KODAKPMSKOAEBBETUIS
ELAPSEOTHEBUTTOGRACES
STYGECKOSATOMICESO
BIGORIBCAGEOSET
RAJIVMGMLASSHANACHO
EMOTIOALCONANIMOTOYOU
MELNANUYAYMERISENUS
OBLOGSTOYTOITOEIROIST
PAYSPESTOIBEAMACES
WARDHUETZUSMUT
STRIFESENTEREDLETITBE
THETREELIGHTINGCEREMONY
AAMCOLOCNOEEVESEGER
GISHSUEOSSTSPRAGE
Sun 1/3/2010ANTIQUE FINISH
ENYAOPECBASSCOBRA
MOORVETOLMNOPAXIOM
TRUMPETHPLAYERSLONGI
DRYERISISEDSELGES
GTOCELEBRITYDIETH
STRANGEUSDEIN
IRANETESTOABIJOU
ROCKETHSCIENTISTSCUT
TESLAOHMSRAHSRTA
ANALITTERBASKETH
SPASTICOASISOTTAWAN
PICKETHFENCESTSO
ELOICOOODESHOARS
NAMSHOESTRINGBUDGETH
TRANQTHENTAGGNAT
TUGARISECRETS
AFGHANBLANKETHLAG
NAEDUEBYESAUNOVEL
TUNICBUCKETHBRIGADES
ELIZAEMAILOBITTOOK
STEERSTDSEAVEENVY
Sun 6/7/2009SHIFTY BUSINESS
ODDESTPOWCAMPISLETS
NOIDEAAREOLAECASTRO
NESTEDSCAMMEROKTHEN
OTCNAMEPESURNSING
WHOSFGOTOTBASEFACTS
THOMSONONEIDAS
CAVEARTDEOXYNOVICES
ANOINTBADDFACEMASK
RAINDELAYOMOOSNORTY
STDSGARCRISCOUVRAY
TAKESANSTANCE
DUTCHEXOTICLILBATE
ITALICATOZALTEREGOS
GAMEROOMEASYAUGERS
SHIATSUSPRITERNESTO
NYTIMESRAILSAT
THISSJULYFBBQSRSIDE
TANSLATCRUTEMPCOD
ONDOPEINHASTEALIENS
POISONNEUTERSSABINE
SIESTAGAPESATHYMNAL
Thu 11/6/2008
SUITGLEAMCAN
ANNORATIOMOST
MPTPLAYERSOLIO
LCDASSBESTOFF
UNPOPULAR
EMANVASLIDS
SSHOOTERVENEER
IDOWORKTFSREO
TOYINGSYSTEMIC
SSNSAPETANK
SURFAAREA
SCRAPERREVORG
WHENLATOYAJSON
AIDEEMILEUSTA
MCQTENDSPATT
Sun 9/14/2008YEAR-ROUND
STUARTROSIEOMEGA
PASTORERASECAROLER
YOKOONOLIFANAUGMENT
ETEBAJOBEYSMTYCOB
ATTSAWAITPOORATMO
SEEINGREDGUTSYTRIO
TRADOMMISSIONSRAOCK
ADAYTOITGATO
CADRESWANNBENEFITS
OTOAUSTINGIANTITOO
MANERBOARDANCIENTMAN
BRAYOATESLIKESOBIG
SINEWAVEFELTSBAERS
DATENIKIMOLD
DECOSADRENALINEJKIE
IMHOABRAMBONESCANS
SUERHACKDWELTTROT
CLEJOSHARATJESARE
MASCARAFRAHTEPISODE
ATEAWAYACHOOPERUKE
NESTSMOTORSEEDER
Sun 6/15/2008DID YOU GET THE MEMO?
TOPSOFFCANDIDGROPE
EVENPARADORNEDHOHOS
REPOSSESSEDAUTOISHOT
SNUBEATCRANESELA
ESPRELYINGONINSTINCT
BOXYRAISLASHRUE
TRUANTCONGAAHYES
REPAIRMANUALMETRO
IFSAOLMEALSTEST
NUTCASEREPORTFORDUTY
ATALLJEERSATCORER
RETAILOUTLETSNIAGARA
YSERBLADETADSEN
ESSENRECONMISSION
PINTASLANTGOEASY
GNULLAMAHRSMINX
REMOTEPOSSIBILITYSRO
AXEDBEDEWLEGAMEN
TIREDREVERSEENGINEER
ELITESLEEPINOLDNAVY
DECOYARTISTNOSIREE