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Lynn Lempel author page

98 puzzles by Lynn Lempel
with Jeff Chen comments

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9812/9/19795/16/20222
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Lynn Lempel
View these same grids with comments from:
Constructor (29)Will Shortz (2)Jeff Chen (34)Jim Horne (9)Hide comments

See the 327 answer words debuted by Lynn Lempel.

2 collaborators: Joy Behar Victor Fleming
Alternate name for this constructor:
Lynn Gilbert Lempel

96 Shortz Era Daily crosswords by Lynn Lempel

Mon 5/16/2022
MARESASOFEGOS
AWASHTOGANOAH
ZAPPAWALLVOTE
DRINKLIKEAFISH
ADDEELFREE
RUNLIKEADEER
AESOPRELYGRE
FLOWSWAYSTGIF
EMUALOTGASES
WORKLIKEADOG
BEETNUTSTS
WATCHLIKEAHAWK
DOLTEARLJAMIE
ROLLRIMEOZONE
ELSESCATBEAST

Beasts of burden featured today, four animals assigned to simile duty. I appreciated that it's not just another "general animal similes" theme, since so many have been done over the years, but it more specifically uses a consistent "(verb) LIKE A (animal)" pattern.

I enjoy "tight" themes, i.e. there's a limited set, because that can lend a sense of elegance and/or awe. If it seems too easy to flesh out a theme, it can feel like anyone could do it. This one doesn't have perfect tightness, but there aren't nearly as many other options as I first thought. I came up with:

  • EAT LIKE A PIG
  • FLY LIKE AN EAGLE
  • LAUGH LIKE A HYENA
  • SING LIKE A CANARY

And a fifth one that wouldn't fly with the New York Times involving equine evacuation would match nicely with DRINK LIKE A FISH.

It would have been hilarious to tell a story with the four verbs, perhaps WATCH EAT DRINK LAUGH describing party animals getting together to Netflix and Chill. However, one of the most important aspects of a constructor's job is to set up solvers for victory, and Lynn did that well for newer puzzlers. It's not perfect, since something like RIME crossing IRMA might flummox newbs, but it's close.

Mon 1/10/2022
COPSYOGABEST
DRAWAROSEMYTH
CEREALBOWLWEAR
GEESEEATSRI
PANTSBILLYJOEL
ANTPALLRURAL
LOSTSOULVALETS
HELMAONE
EMBEDSEXITPOLL
SORTACREDREP
CLEANCOALSCATS
ADASAPHOOTS
POKEPIGEONHOLE
EVILSEALSERIN
DANKSPITNYPD

Let's play ... "Name That Extra Themer!" This man could believably have been in BILLY JOEL's We Didn't Start the Fire, his views on CLEAN COAL causing Germans to PIGEONHOLE him, his EXIT POLL numbers leaving him a LOST SOUL.

Oh, and his head looks like a CEREAL BOWL.

Bing bing bing, it's HELMUT KOHL! Someone stop me, I'm on a roll!

Rhyming themes are a tough sell, but Lynn clears the threshold with six rhyming words, all of which 1.) use different spellings, and 2.) are one syllable. It makes for a tight set, with HELMUT KOHL the only other one I could think of. Him being from decades ago (Kohl, not me! Okay, me too) he's falling out of Monday newb-friendly territory.

Newb-friendly grid, as is Lynn's specialty. She took such care in her layout, using those three central black square diagonals so well to separate the themers. It's often easier to pinch themers together when there are six of them — moving BILLY JOEL up one row, for example, can improve gridding flexibility — but the every-other-row pattern is so pleasing.

This one didn't stand out in the overdone rhyming-but-different-spellings genre, but as a whole, even a troll would say it's a friendly Monday stroll. Perhaps not in Seoul, but—

*XWORD INFO BOT INITIATING DAMAGE CONTROL*

POW Mon 3/29/2021
ATWARRUGBYASA
PHASEEMILEPCT
RIDINGHABITLAB
NESTLEEPITOME
AMISOAKUMPS
DINGBRERRABBIT
ONTAPNOUN
TOBEORNOTTOBE
ALOEEVENT
TREBLECLEFALTO
IAGOSTOPGRE
MIRACLEARABIA
ESEPEBBLEBEACH
LETAIOLILENTO
YDSSANTAONSET

People ping me so often with various TO BE OR NOT TO BE ideas that it's hard for me to be impressed with any of them. That leaning made me shrug when I hit today's revealer. Rhyming words, one with a double B, one with a single B … not impressive, since there should be a big handful of these. Dozens. Hundreds, maybe!

May-B not.

The fact that HABIT / RABBIT and TREBLE / PEBBLE don't just rhyme, but their endings differ only by a single vs. double B, makes the set so tight. I couldn't think of a single other pair that would work like this.

My appreciation for this concept grew and grew. There's something so impressive about the theme tightness.

And there's Lynn's beautiful gridwork, perfect for newer solvers. It's not technically perfect, but entries like ESE are easily figure-out-able. Plus, they're fine prices to pay to allow for the fun long bonuses, THIN MINT, BELGIANS, ENTR'ACTE.

Not only a strong Monday grid, but a crossworthy addition to the TO BE OR NOT TO BE genre.

Mon 9/28/2020
VERDIASAPJOAN
ADORNMEMOUNTO
LUAUSPROPAGATE
DIETUSERPIX
CARDAMOMATARI
ATAMIRCABARET
BOGSCLERIC
METAPHYSICIAN
EDDIESTBAR
CRAWDADNASUMA
HORSECASTANET
ATERIGAKIND
PANASONICGNATS
ETALTARAMINOR
LESTAWOLAETNA

I used to call this theme type "parsing puzzles," but I got so many questions. Parsing, as in par sing? Is that a hybrid golf / Broadway sport? Parse, as in Persephone — more like Parsephone because she split (ha) her time between Earth and Hades?

I have peculiar readers, and I'm proud of it.

I tried DO THE SPLITS as a revealer for a puzzle of yore, but Will Shortz politely said something to the effect of "shouldn't a revealer make sense and feel apt?" So, let's call these types of puzzles "spaced out" themes for now.

I enjoyed most of today's finds, Lynn treating us to natural sounding PROP A GATE and CAST A NET, and best of all, the spicy CARD A MOM. That's almost as evocative as CRAW A DAD!

Huh? That's not a thing? Well, if CAB A RET is a thing, then surely ...

Be quiet, you. You know you thought the same thing.

I wasn't as hot on METAPHYSICIAN as the marquee central answer. Not only does the noun "metaphysics" sound stronger, but MET is the only theme verb in the past tense. Sing it with me: one of these things is not like the other

What else could Lynn have used? I'd have to write some code, scouring through my word list, looking for the letter A in each entry, eliminating it and then checking to see if …

Huh? You stopped listening three days ago? Well, so did I. So there.

I did like the "(verb) A (noun)" consistency, but the theme would have sung so much more strongly with something like PREP A RATION or BUCK A ROO (in a 16-wide grid) in the middle.

I appreciated Lynn's Monday-smoothness. I'd happily give the grid to a newb — those bonuses of ROAD RAGE, CABARET, STIGMA helping juice things up — but I'd have to warn them that it's not the most exciting theme, given how many times the "spaced out" genre has been tapped in crosswords.

Mon 8/10/2020
CUBABOASHAM
AHABHORDECOLA
ROBEORGANDONOR
SHYMUGGARRETS
BARNTITAN
FLORIDAROOMGMT
RANGSRORAHRAH
OWNUPFIGSUEDE
SNEERSKIANERF
HSTATLASROCKET
CYRUSMOHS
CICADASDOHARK
LOCKOFHAIRCLUE
ANNEELWAYEASY
PSYDYESODES

It's a joy to get stumped on my "Name That Theme" game on a Monday, if I slap my head at the end, knowing I should have gotten it. Organ KEYS, the Florida KEYS, KEYS in an Atlas, lock and KEY. D'oh! Masterfully done, baffling me until the last grid entry.

"What simple concept ties these things together?" themes are some of my favorite. This one inspired me to brainstorm what else would have worked. There's the KEY on a basketball court, but that could have gotten lost on non-sports fans. (It's the painted floor area around a hoop.)

What else? A cryptography KEY, but that could have also gone over solvers' heads, especially newer ones.

The only other one I could imagine was an answer KEY, although that would have been tough to work in. Perhaps with a TEACHERS GUIDE?

No, Lynn did a masterful job of picking ones that displayed a wide variety of KEY meanings, while making each obviously accessible to a broad solving audience. Well done!

The fill had an older feel to it, though. Once you start with ATLAS ROCKET (from the 1950's), include GARRETS (a term for attics), BABY BONNET, and PRAY DO, you end up with a quaint sort of feel. The FLORIDA ROOM apparently is "retro" now, so that sort of helped? Maybe hurt as well? Not sure.

The clue for KEYS felt off-pitch (that's my terrible pun for you ORGAN players out there). I get what it's going for, riffing on the issue that KEYS seem to eternally walk away, but these KEYS aren't "lost" in the entries, moreso hinted at. A more straightforward clue would have worked better.

Solid concept overall. I especially appreciated that ORGAN DONOR innocently misled away from the musical instrument, adding to my bafflement and thus heightening my a-ha when the light finally snapped on.

Mon 7/6/2020
NADALMICASLID
OBAMAOPALTYNE
SALTYVANGUARDS
ELLSAIDATTIRE
JOYRIDESOSCAR
ONIONSPUPSGT
BENDPEORIA
GINGERSNAPS
NOMORERIPA
GELDANMAIDEN
ALAMOBOBSLEDS
MODIFYALASLAW
BILLFOLDSEMILE
ISEERAGETONER
TESSEDENSEEDS

Monday fill is like an NFL right tackle — 99% of the time that you notice it, it's because of something it did wrong. Perhaps it missed a block (ambiguous crossing) or forgot the play call (crossword glue unfamiliar to newbs). It's so rare that it executes a play spectacular enough for announcers to applaud.

Check out what Lynn did with her mid-length fill today. As I solved, I kept noticing the beautiful entries: NOSE JOB, UTOPIA, IN DRAG, ATTIRE, GAMBIT, ELOISE, MAIDEN, PEORIA, NO MORE ... but there was more! It's astounding that Lynn created so many of these slots, and then used so many of them so well. All those colorful and evocative ASSETS!

Most themed grids break up their 15-length sides into three chunks, making 3-5 length entries show up over the years ad infinitum. 6s and 7s make appearances much less frequently, so when they do, they often feel fresher to us regulars. I love this layout, the black squares spaced in a Zen-like balance that allows for 6-7 heaven all over.

I usually emphasize longer bonus fill — I'd have tried to extend STATS to make it an 8-9 letter slot, since long entries can often sing more strongly than mid-lengthers — but Lynn achieved so much with her layout. I'll have to rethink my gridwork philosophy.

We've seen many variations on this theme type, celeb names repurposed in different ways. I did enjoy feeling sheepish, as all these years, I thought it was [First name] van Cliburn.

Overall, though, it would have been great to find some way to make this theme set stand out. There are so many first names that can be worked into common phrases that this set came across as too loosey-goosey.

Mon 4/20/2020
LAPELMOJOSTLE
ICUDEEDUNTIED
BALLGAMEMOUNDS
IDSAYSOBFF
DIETHIGHOFFICE
OASESROUTSLAT
ELSTARAIRA
BADNEWSCOWBELL
ALIWALLNOR
NESTLOOPLEAKY
SCHOOLPLAYEDIE
OHOROMCOMS
OUTLAWBOYOHBOY
ASSUREIDOLENO
RAPPEDNYSESOU

BOY OH BOY, it's been a while since we've seen a "both words can follow X" theme. A few years ago, Will Shortz mentioned that he's phasing out simpler "words that can follow X" themes, and it feels like the "both words" variant is on its last legs.

As they go, this one works well. BALL boy, GAME boy (Nintendo gaming device), HIGH boy (some sort of chest of drawers?), etc. Listing these off makes me feel like Bubba from "Forrest Gump" talking about shrimp. Cabin boy, old boy, altar boy, poor boy, golden boy, mamas boy … boy oh boy, there sure are a lot of them!

A common problem with this theme type is that the phrases tend to be on the dull side since it's not easy to have both parts of the themers mesh with your key word. BALL GAME, BAD NEWS, COW BELL are solid, but as I solved, HIGH OFFICE made me wonder if Lynn had restrictions on her choices. Same with SCHOOL PLAY. They're reasonable answers, but usually, you'd strive for more colorful material.

Having six themers forced some non-Lempelian compromises, too. H??C is a tough pattern to work with, and some newbs may look at HUAC and ask themselves if crosswords are right for them. "I have to know ILIE of tennis?" might be a reason to put down the puzzle and do something else, too.

There are a lot of nice bonuses, though, JUMBOTRON, LIBIDO, KIMONO, PARODY adding spice to the solve.

All in all, a solid, if not outstanding example of this theme type. I'm hoping that Will won't take any more this cut and dried, but there's still room for ones that do something a little different with the genre.

Tue 3/3/2020
TESTSECOLPVT
STIRUPLAVAAIR
ANNIEOAKLEYUSE
RASPSRSREFLEX
OMITSHRUB
GASLITGOESNUTS
EMAILBOARKNEE
TONALROKERYAW
AUTOOAFSABASE
TRAVESTYSTONED
CARESGWEN
YELLATCUEFETA
AVASIMONEBILES
LIUEMITPARIAH
ELSSEXYGEEKY

Star search! I've heard the pun on ANNIE OAKLEY = "shooting star" — a few times in crossword clues, even — but the others felt fresh. AL ROKER certainly is a "morning star." SANTA CLAUS as a "pole star" is especially fun.

(I admit, I've heard other many puns on "pole star," though always in ways that are most definitely not NYT-appropriate.)

SIMONE BILES is a "gold star" in that she won a bunch of golds in the Olympics. It's not as direct a pun as the others, though, since it makes her sound like she's made up of gold, or she's a star at Gold's gym. It's a cute pun, but it works differently than the others, so it's inconsistent.

I know, completely ridiculous distinction. But that's me, ridiculous.

This could have been POW! material with a slight change: it'd have been awesome if all five base phrases came from astronomy. So sad that Lynn gave up on DOG STAR!

Unfortunately, that means that as much as I admire SIMONE BILES and her golden smile, someone playing on DOG STAR (Old Yeller) or NORTH STAR (Santa Claus, with "pole star" cluing someone of Polish descent I WASN'T THINKING WHAT YOU THINK I WAS THINKNG) would have given the theme such elegance.

Although the theme wasn't perfectly crafted, the grid was. Snazzy long material (GOES NUTS, OVER HERE, TRAVESTY), middle-lengthers (BONFIRE, TRIPOLI, PARIAH, REFLEX), and minimal crossword glue (ECOL PVT SRS)? It all adds up to a puzzle I'd gladly give to a newb solver.

POW Mon 12/2/2019
LABORALPSHEMS
EVADEBITEURGE
GOREDBOARDGAME
OWEBURNMOE
SAMBASEGOSLAP
LIARSLONESOME
NGOMBASEWES
FEIGNYAPCREST
ACMEOGREAIR
STUDYFORABETS
TOMANDYDASHES
HMOMOORELI
READSUPONEBBED
NEATSORETRACE
SLAVEXESSORTS

★ Lynn puts herself in limbo today. Get it, limbo? Because she lowered the bar?

Speaking of lowering the bar, I'll be here all week, folks!

Making a trigram descend is not a novel idea — the one Mary Lou Guizzo and I did a few years ago is just one in this theme class — but Lynn executed it so well. The breakdown:

  1. Well-hidden BARs. No BAR OF SOAP or HEATH BAR CRUNCH or DIVE BAR. I had no idea what was going on until I hit the revealer, and that made for a snappy a-ha moment. Lynn even avoided the BAR sound completely. SANTA BARBARA might have been too overt, for instance.
  2. Judicious BAR spacing. It is possible to get the BARs on a perfect diagonal line, but that requires either the themers to be in columns 4/6/8/10/12, or 2/5/8/11/14. Both of those present technical difficulties, especially when you have Monday smoothness as a target. Lynn's BARs don't lie on a perfectly straight line, but that's hard to see, even if you use a ruler. Fine compromise.
  3. Great execution around themers. Typically, you'd space out CABARETS and LOWER THE BAR by placing the former at the top of the grid and the latter at the bottom, to minimize overlap. Today though, you need to keep both of them toward the bottom. That should cause problems in the SE corner, but Lynn just shrugs it off and produces a silky smooth result, even tossing in some DASHES and SELECT.

When it comes to puzzles featuring down-oriented themers, Will Shortz is laxer than other editors about including long across fill, not worrying about muddying up the theme. Today, I like the inclusion of BOARD GAME. That provides color, important since there's not much room for down-oriented long fill (the five themers take up too much space). I'd have loved for READS UP ON to be as snazzy as BOARD GAME, but what can you do.

Same sentiment for the assemblage of ABBR / NGO / ECTO in the NW corner, but that's a reasonable result, given the level of technical difficulty.

Overall, a Monday offering I'd happily give to a newb. I'd likely have to circle the BARs for them afterward, as they're easy to miss (see below for highlighting), but that only shows them how much a genius me be.

Mon 9/30/2019
LAIRPCSCAPES
ALOEAHAORIOLE
PANPIPESMORTON
TRASHPICKUPS
CLAIMSALTISEE
DOLLARUSES
RODEBURGVSIGN
ONERIPTIDEROO
MSNBCTENSTORT
OAHUTBONES
SCABERASLASSO
PUTDOWNROOTS
OTOOLEBLASTOFF
TILLEDYAKERIE
SELESSRSDENY

Whenever newish solvers ask me for suggestions on how to get started solving the NYT crossword, I point them to Lynn's body of work. She produces such smooth products, setting up solvers for emphatic slam-dunk victories. Today's is right in line. IRMA is perhaps the only tough entry — and an easy-peasy clue for that, anagramming MIRA, makes it no problem.

I like my crosswords fun and uplifting. This one was fun, but not so much uplifting, given that the themers were ordering me to tear five things a new one. PUT DOWN ROOTS = put down "Roots" was a clever reinterpretation, but the idea of being ordered to put down a literary classic … not for me.

Four out of five themers were spot-on, exhibiting both neat meaning changes and strong base phrases. The only one that didn't hit was TRASH PICKUPS, which sounds more like a dictionary entry than something I'd say in casual conversation.

Lynn did something unusual with her layout, stacking pairs of themers, i.e., PAN PIPES and TRASH PICKUP atop each other. As long as your overlapping letter pairs are friendly, this often makes grid design easier; as if you only had three themers to work with instead of five. It allowed Lynn to freestyle a bit, working in so many goodies: AIR KISS, BOB DOLE, REPTILE, T BONES, UPTURN.

The drawback is that the themers can feel crammed up against each other. Constructors have an ongoing debate, Lynn's approach here (producing a better solving experience due to stronger bonuses), vs. spacing themers out, in rows 3, 5, 8, 11, 13 (solvers experiencing themers in a more equally distributed manner).

Constructors are weird.

Tue 8/13/2019
ROSSTONTOMET
OSLOSPOONLODE
CHILDPROOFERIE
KATIEANTIANTS
DASHRAVI
SILENTPREVENTS
ACERALOEINGOT
BEACROSSEDDNA
LASSOGETSMEAT
EXTERIORTRAWLS
OXENGAIN
WIFIKEELSALSA
IRASSTRIKEGOLD
FILMINANEENID
ESLNASTYDEMS

No one makes SOLIDER early-week puzzles than Lynn. Her formula is tried and true: go up to the max of 78 words (or near it), so that you can pack in some bonuses (EXTERIOR, SEXISM, ON FIRE) while making your short fill as unobjectionable as possible. With just minor blips in ESL ESTA, it's a top-notch early-week product.

I've worked with many newer constructors eager to debut what they consider fresh or cool new short material. That focus on personal ego is opposed to solver satisfaction, so I always appreciate Lynn's unwavering laser-lock onto smoothness.

I wish the theme had been more interesting, though. A puzzle this technically proficient deserves POW! consideration — it's so hard to achieve this level of silkiness. I couldn't give it a nom, because intersecting "___ STAR" words is too easy. There's a lack of elegance when you can think of a ton of other options like GUEST, NORTH, RADIO, POLE, SEA, SUPER, TIN, DEATH, DWARF, etc.

Maybe if Lynn had crossed stars like RIGEL (is URI GELLER a star?), VEGA, SIRIUS? Now that would have been serious!

I did like how the crossers pictorially formed stars (ish) in the four corners of the grid. ROCK and CHILD not as much, but LONE and GOLD resemble what you might see in a quick sketch of the night sky? Sort of? If you squint hard?

Although the theme didn't sparkle, the overall puzzle still worked well as an early-week offering. I'd give it to a rookie solver, with the caveat that it's not exciting, but it is likely solvable.

Mon 7/22/2019
CAPDEERDODGED
RIOIDLEORIOLE
ESPRUMMAGESALE
ELUDEURNCLAP
PELICANSTATE
AETNAPERILS
RATSADOSENDOW
ALISTILTONIRA
STOVEREUPPOEM
PONIEDDEBIT
SKINNYDIPPER
AUDISAOSERTA
WHATSMYNAMEOUT
EUROPAOPECODE
SHERYLSENTFED

Impeccable gridwork. Perfect for newbs — smooth as silk, ANAT as the only speed bump, and such a feature-filled solve. The crappy crossword you get in your local newspaper (which might even be computer-generated) would never contain an embarrassment of bonus riches like IDIOT PROOF, POPULATION, DISCERN, VISITOR, BISECT, DOGNAP, EUROPA. While it's true that editors prize multi-word phrases for their color, how often do you see something as interesting as EUROPA as an incidental?

Textbook Monday construction. Space out your themers, alternating them left-right. Use a couple of long downs in opposite corners. Then carefully select mid-length entries, while testing, testing, testing to make sure you can fill the last regions without crossword glue.

As for the theme, most Monday solvers won't remember a previous RUMPELSTILTSKIN puzzle. Heck, neither will most regular solvers.

Double heck, some Monday solvers might not even know that crosswords have themes. Fie on you!

It's a shame that my dang brain immediately lasered in on the previous puzzle, recalling not just the author but some of the theme phrases, roughly when it was published, and the fact that I gave it my POW!

I liked Bruce's interpretation better, RUMP EL STILT SKIN as stand-alone words. Lynn's works too, but it's not as impressive. So many phrases start with RUM, for example, that it feels much easier to do this way.

POW!-level gridwork. POY!-level even. Crème de la crème, exactly how a Monday solving experience should be. A shame that the other puzzle bested it — and a shame that I'm likely one of the three people remembered it (me, Bruce, and that guy who keeps emailing me with snide comments YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE BUDDY BOY OH YEAH YOU BETTER BELIEVE YOU'RE STILL BLOCKED).

Mon 6/3/2019
LPSALTOREFER
IRKBARNSOMALI
MAINSTAYEGOISM
IDEEKIXMETRES
TARHEELFIRES
RLSLOPSHED
ARGUEBERRAAVE
ROOGOODDOGKEN
IDOYURTSLEERY
DESKTAOCOM
ENACTHOWCOME
MEDINAPOLERAS
CLOVISHOUSESIT
ALWESTDEMIONE
TENSESYNCNEE

Too bad this one wasn't run during the (GOOD) DOG days of summer. (That may be for the best since there are no such things as good dogs days of summer, says this self-professed West coast weather wimp.)

I was curious if this set of commands — STAY, HEEL, COME, SIT, SHAKE, DOWN — was a tight, complete set. FETCH and BEG were the one other one-worders that felt like they belonged. Hard to find phrases that can hide them, though, so I like the set Lynn chose.

The themers are a mix of one-worders, hyphenations, and two-worders. I would have preferred more consistency, which should have been possible, given how common all six words are. But at least Lynn didn't have five of one and a single outlier. A diverse mix is the next best thing to 100% consistency.

Not as smooth and newb-friendly as a usual Lempel grid. Hmm. Why is that?

One of the curiosities of grid design is that it's often difficult to start with an 8-letter themer. 9-10 letters is ideal.

But Jeff, doesn't a longer themer introduce more constraints? Surely, the shorter the better?

(You were expecting me to drop a "length matters" joke, weren't you? I admit, I thought about it.)

Check out the NE and SW corners. See how chunky they are? That's primarily dictated by the eight-letter MAINSTAY forcing a six-square width in the NE. It's possible to break up that space more than Lynn did, but that's not a trivial task. With that much space, it's tough to avoid a couple of clunkers like METRES and the less common EGO(t)ISM, or toughish entries that might trip up newer solvers, like MEDINA / CLOVIS / ANISE.

I did enjoy some of the longer fill — OUTCAST and SEMIPRO were fun bonuses. Note Lynn's pro use of cheater squares at the end of OUTCAST and beginning of SEMIPRO. These made her filling job easier at the expense of shortening those long slots, but she was still able to make good use of them.

As a dog-lover, I enjoyed the overall IDEE. A couple of longer themers like SPIKED HEEL or DOUBLE DOWN could have both brightened and eased the solving experience, though.

Mon 12/3/2018
GASPSAWEBALKS
ASTRODOGEVENT
SCOOBYDOORECUR
EONSATEFINITE
STEPMORNINGDEW
TEASINGE
ACORNSINERSVP
MOONOCANDOTAR
POLOMANYABATE
USERBRIT
POSTAGEDUEMEAT
AMELIAINNORZO
BATINPASDEDEUX
SHUNTONECAPRI
TAPESPAROLSEN

Anyone else humming "Strangers in the Night" right now?

Tight set of homophones, DOO DEW DO DUE DEUX.

I bet fans of Hüsker Dü (the band) or Hūsker Dū? (the game) will be shouting THAT'S NOT A TIGHT THEME SET YOU JERKY JERK, HOW COULD YOU FORGET TO INCLUDE THE BEST BAND / GAME IN THE HISTORY OF BANDS / GAMES?

(You'd think I was joking, but I do get emails like this every once in a while.)

At the risk of enraging fans more, I like the decision to not include HUSKER DU, as this theme is so straightforward that it had to be run on a Monday. It'd be a rough ask to expect newer solvers to fill in the bizarre-looking HUSKERDU string. Hu skerdu?

It's tough for me to get excited about such a straightforward and simple theme. But the set is tight, the grid is solid, with just a bit of WOOER (is the other person the WOOEE?) and LECID (could be a turnoff for newer solvers). Along with solid bonuses in STONETOOL, STATE REPS, AVENGER, BIMODAL, it's a friendly offering for newbs.

Mon 8/13/2018
BOSCFACTLLAMA
OHIOAREAPOLOS
GODOWNINHISTORY
ELIETONTHEE
MAKEPASSESEAST
IBISESTAR
TACTHEMPNYPD
TSKGETARUNRIB
ESPNCROCAIDE
ICELATVIA
VAMPDRAWABLANK
ALOEGATEEAT
GOODNEWSBADNEWS
UNDUELEEKTEAR
EGYPTSARAARGO

I loved this concept, phrases that can represent GOOD NEWS or BAD NEWS, depending on how you look at them. To GO DOWN IN HISTORY is fantastic, in terms of creating a lasting legacy. Going down in history class, not so much.

DRAW A BLANK is so clever — great thing to do, in Scrabble! Not so good when you DRAW A BLANK, as in when you're unable to come up with something (as I often do in Scrabble!).

GET A RUN is another good one, GOOD in baseball, BAD in hosiery.

MAKE PASSES is okay, as it's good to complete passes in football, not so good in a bar. But MAKE PASSES is stilted-sounding in the realm of football.

I'll explain PRO to those that might have been as confused as I was. How does a PROfessional give you the "aye"? When it's a professional pirate? Nope, I red-facedly admit it took a long time to think about a PRO vote = giving the "aye".

I wish we had some pirates in the Senate.

Solid Lempelian gridwork. All you need is a pair of great bonuses — SIDEKICKS and PRIVATEER, yes! — and the doggedness to keep your grid to a minor smattering of INST ABED. Often, it's "just" a matter of tireless and grueling iteration. The best constructors like Lynn make it seem easy.

This is a Wish I'd Thought of That concept. It's a shame that MAKE PASSES fell flat for me, as this would have been an easy POW! choice otherwise. I can see where Lynn was coming from though — you have to stop and submit at some point.

Mon 4/23/2018
ATWARSTEPMYTH
LIETOTHAICOHO
SCATTERRUGQUIP
OKRAROODUNNE
SCRAMBLEDEGGS
MATHISALEE
ASHENALUMNICE
WIIGOFIRSTNAY
SANDPITAHASTE
EVERDEBITS
LEAVENEDBREAD
INBOXIRALISA
EDITSHOOTHOOPS
NUDEAUDIINUIT
SPEDPEELPESTO

GO FIRST! Because the theme answers start with synonyms for GO. As in DEPART, EXIT …

Er, more like synonyms for "GO!" SCAT! SCRAM already! Kind of a pushy Monday puzzle, sheesh! Trying to tell us something, hmm, Lynn?

Some neat finds, most of the themers snazzy. I wasn't sure what a SCATTER RUG was (another term for a throw rug apparently), but I like the sound of it.

I hitched slightly on LEAVENED BREAD, as it's the only one where the GO! synonym changes pronunciation. It would have been nice for all of them to have a pronunciation change, or none of them, for consistency's sake. Ah well. The crossword gods can be cruel.

Are GITANO JEANS still a thing?

Now, this is the way to execute on a simple Monday theme. Go up to 78 words if you need to, but make sure to weave in at least a couple of long bonuses — WEARS THIN, INSIDIOUS, MCQUEEN, even ATTACHE — while keeping your short stuff from getting noticed. Lynn is so good about using those longer slots to her advantage, elevating the solving experience.

Although, there was one area I felt was subpar for her: the DDE / ALEE / DUNNE region. It would have been fine if it had been any other constructor, but a little-used Presidential monogram, a nautical term, and an actress from "old Hollywood"? Not quite up to Lynn's bar.

I liked MCQUEEN and the YOUNG / THING pairing. I'd personally have chosen to smoothify the grid by taking one or more of those out. But I can respect Lynn's choice.

Overall, a fine Monday puzzle. I liked the theme enough that I considered it for the POW! If the revealer had packed more punch, creating a sharper a-ha moment, it might well have been my pick.

Mon 3/5/2018
COBRABRASHCOY
ARIESROUTEHMO
CITYSLICKERRIG
HOEAIDSTOYOTA
ENSUINGASIAN
BLUESTOCKING
EMCEESWONCEO
BOARDJAMPALED
BOPBUYLONERS
STUFFEDSHIRT
CURRYUNKEMPT
GEHRIGANDYAAA
AMISMARTYPANTS
GUNKATIEINLET
ASSSNEADGAYLE

Phrases in the form of (adjective + article of clothing = slang term for a person). I've seen related themes, using STUFFED SHIRT and SMARTY PANTS. But most of them have been much looser, including stuff like MOVIE SHORTS, YELLOW JACKET, BLACK HAT, etc. So I like the added level of tightness today.

BLUESTOCKING was a new term to me. Fascinating to read up on the history of the Blue Stockings Society, a women's pro-education movement.

I had a hard time figuring out if CITY SLICKER was out of place, as the only one where the article of clothing changed meaning. But SMARTY PANTS … appears not to be related to the PANTS one wears? Not sure.

As usual, Lynn gives us a solid Monday grid. A couple of nice bonuses in PORKY PIG, CAPUCHINS, CHRONICLE. Nothing amazing, but all in all, enough bonuses to keep up my interest.

Most important for a Monday is that it's accessible to a newer solver, and this one *mostly* fits the bill. Short fill is usually where constructors fall off the wagon, but with just a bit of NEER — minor, since NEER-do-well is a common enough phrase — it's super smooth. Yay!

(There's an argument to be made that ROCS / AUK might be tricky, but I think these words ought to at least look familiar to educated solvers.)

If it hadn't been for BLUESTOCKING … the last thing you want to do as a constructor is to turn off newer solvers, and I wonder if newbs might scratch their heads even after a correct solve, wondering if they need to know stuff like this to be successful at crosswords.

I wondered if BLACK HAT would have been a better inclusion, but stupid crossword symmetry wouldn't have allowed for that. I couldn't think of any others to match either BLACK HAT or STUFFED SHIRT. Drat! I suppose I hesitatingly would have ended up making the same decision Lynn did.

Someone make up another term already to appease the crossword gods! How about ... MUSTACHIOED SHORTS (describing a lover of enigmatology, of course)?

Mon 1/29/2018
GOSSIPTGIMESS
LAMARRREDDIWIP
ETALIIALIENATE
NHLSNOWAGNEW
SLYTELLALL
WEBMDATTEMPT
SHOPPETILRULE
TARADMIRALMIA
ELLSIONROBBER
MODELUNIGLOO
VAMOOSEPJS
ESSESPARKUPC
DOWNSIZEANEMIA
NAUTICALCOMBED
ARMYUPSEXTOLS

Who knew that DOWNSIZE-ing could be fun? I've highlighted the key words to make Lynn's creative take stand out. SMALL to MEDIUM to LARGE to … JUMBO? Hard to find a good phrase hiding the word EXTRA LARGE, I suppose!

Loved SMALL WORLD; great phrase. To me, that was the standout of the four themers. MUMBO JUMBO was the snazziest of the bunch, but JUMBO didn't feel quite right in the size progression. I so badly wanted XL — stupid t-shirt industry with its indoctrination!

(We snooty Seattleites know that the proper term for "ridiculously large" is VENTI.)

PRINT MEDIUM … I'm so used to seeing it in the plural, PRINT MEDIA, that I struggled to stretch MEDIA across those last six boxes. And an AT LARGE RACE does appear to be a phrase in usage, but it didn't roll off my tongue as I said it to myself.

Not as smooth as Lynn's Monday puzzles are. Lynn mentioned many of these already, but kicking off with ET ALII, tough for newbies, some OPEL, LASSI (generally fine, but a lot of possibility to turn off newer solvers), ISA, TGI, both ELLS and ESSES. Oof!

Why so much? This layout is a little unusual — the placement of DOWNSIZE takes up valuable real estate. And check out how SMALL WORLD and PRINT MEDIUM aren't staggered, like adjacent themers usually would be. (PRINT MEDIUM would usually be shoved all the way to the bottom of the puzzle, for better spacing.) That creates problems in the NW corner.

But I did appreciate Lynn's efforts to give some bonuses here and there. MODEL UN was great, as was REDDIWIP and VAMOOSE.

Overall, I felt like Lynn's original idea of just a SMALL MEDIUM LARGE progression, along with DOWNSIZE (perhaps split as DOWN / SIZE across the middle row?) would have made for a tidier Monday puzzle. Neat concept, cool idea that I hadn't seen before — but I wouldn't recommend the puzzle as executed to newbies.

POW Mon 12/25/2017
PRIMCLOTLATCH
JADEEONSALOHA
SHOTCLOCKYEMEN
RUSSETEXANS
CALORIEFATTEE
OSUSUNBELTOYL
RICHESLACEUP
KAYONUTSASH
VETOERFIASCO
CSAWAXBEANTAG
RUNOTTRUDDERS
IMPISHMOXIE
SMELTHITPARADE
CILIAARIABAIL
OTTERMACSYANK

★ What a nice Christmas present, opening up another Lempelian delight. Like Lynn mentioned, I'd seen this theme a few times before — disguised synonyms for HIT — but I still got an a-ha moment because she did such a great job obfuscating CLOCK, BELT, BEAN (as in a beanball in baseball), PELT, and PASTE. Why had this huge "Peanuts" fan never thought of how apt LUCY VAN PELT's last name is?!

Great themer choices, too, colorful selections in SHOT CLOCK, SUN BELT, HIT PARADE, etc. Almost all of them I'd happily incorporate into a themeless.

Interesting choice to use the "windmill" layout of themers. That often allows for smoother fill because it spaces themers out to the max. Today, it lets Lynn squeeze two shorties — SUN BELT and WAX BEAN — into the center. A more traditional layout of "all themers in the across direction" would likely have resulted in more difficulty in filling, as putting six themers in the traditional way is no joke.

Neat that Lynn still managed to work in some beauties in the fill: CELSIUS, FAUX PAS, even MOXIE. The "windmill" layout's drawback is often a dearth of bonus fill, so good work here.

A bit more crossword glue that I'm used to in a Lempel, though: OTT, CSA (Confederate States of America), RAH, ILIE, RUSSE, VETOER. And a tough section for novices, CILIA / ILIE / SMELT. Given the simplicity of the theme, I would have preferred a stricter adherence to newbie-friendliness.

But overall, another gem of a puzzle from the early-week master, still at the top of my list of favorite Monday bylines. Such a pleasurable solving experience.

Speaking of pleasurable, heartfelt thanks to all our readers and site users out there. Jim and I know that you all have many URLs that attract your attention, so to continually get your eyeballs and feedback is a blessing to us. Happy holidays!

POW Tue 9/26/2017
NEHIWOKSDUBS
ADAMROOTSACLU
PURPLEHARTLOIS
DEENLEOANTI
STYLEPAWPRINZE
WEBSKYSAL
ETONFLAKPARIS
PRYORCOMMITMENT
TASTENYADASEA
OERRAPCRY
BARRFIGHTABUTS
ACAIFOETIRE
MOPEFALLENIDLE
BRITSPIESBOON
INDYEXITEGGO

★ So much fun to make comedy out of regular phrases … using comedians! FALLEN IDLE made me laugh; so appropriate to kooky Monty Python humor. PURPLE HART (heart), PAW PRINZE (prints), PRYOR (prior) COMMITMENT, BARR (bar) FIGHT — nice that Joy and Lois drew from different ages, genders, races, and styles of comedy. I only vaguely knew Freddy PRINZE, but that was fine with me, as hitting 4/5 for this pop culture idiot is pretty darn good.

Five themers can give newer constructors fits, so it's a good thing the early-week veteran was on board. Lynn is such a strong constructor, always turning in clean and snazzy grids, and today's is no different. The 15-letter central entry is much easier to work with than a 13 or 11 or even 9 — a 15 doesn't force you to place any black squares — but still, look how many down entries must run through at least two across entries. So many constraints.

Lovely long downs in HARDY BOYS, NOTORIETY, DALAI LAMA, RESCUE DOG. So important to make your long fill slots count, and they did great here.

Smart to stick to 78 words, the max allowed. Some constructors might have attempted the low-word-count challenge (74 or even 72), but that's generally not wise, requiring a lot of compromises.

It is true that there are a ton of short words — a whopping 69 out of 78 that are five letters or less — but that's perfectly fine for an early-week puzzle. The high word count makes it so much easier to avoid dabs of crossword glue. Just some NEHI, OER, ENO, which I'm even hesitant to point out because they're so minor.

Amusing theme, superb execution. Not easy to entertain with an early-week puzzle, but this one succeeded for me.

POW Tue 6/13/2017
WORMLESSGRETA
AREAAMTSLUXOR
LIPSBEESTUDENT
LOOKHEREATOM
ELSALINESLPGA
TEEBILLDEEFLAT
IREWARMAPE
SONGDIMPURE
DEFEDENJRS
EXFILESCUEBERT
STIRCIGARSNEE
CIAOEPISODES
GEESTRINGSPULL
EGRETROUTARIA
MOSSYSANSLENS

★ Always such a treat to get Lynn's byline. She's an absolute wizard on early-week puzzles, producing fun themes surrounded by excellent long bonus fill, and a silky-smooth solve.

Homophone themes have been done many a time, and even homophones on letters of the alphabet. But I don't remember seeing this exact implementation. As a huge Q*BERT fan in my youth, it was fun to see CUE BERT as a kooky indication to signal BERT (from "Sesame Street"). And GEE, STRINGS amused this former cellist.

I paused at TEE BILL, having to think too hard to figure out the base phrase of "t-bill," a government bond. Embarrassing, given that I got my MBA with a focus in finance. Ahem.

I didn't like DEE FLAT as much, either, this one so grammatically tortured. Since Lynn had so many themers already, I would have preferred that one struck out, and EX FILES put in the center of the middle row.

Speaking of theme density, this grid didn't have quite the same astonishing level of snazz and smoothness that I've come to expect from a Lempel product. EXEMPLAR was fun, but JURISTS jarred my ear. Some research shows that it is a very common word in law, but I'd so much rather have something exciting, like LOOK HERE! or CAP GUN.

And it's odd to point out just a handful of AMTS, JRS, ATTY as more crossword glue than usual for a Lempel puzzle, but she's just that good.

Why not as much snazz and a bit more glue than usual? Six themers is not easy to work with, even if four of them are short — as a whole, they take up so much real estate. This is another reason I would have preferred just five themers — I'm sure it would have allowed for at least another pair of strong bonuses in the fill, and given Lynn the flexibility to smooth out one or two of those unsightly short entries.

But overall, such a fun solving experience. Not all themes have to be ground-breaking — a twist on a tried and true theme type can work great when you execute well on your grid. I thought Lynn did well today. Maybe not quite up to her (very high) bar, but still such an enjoyable early-week solve.

Sun 2/12/2017 DO THE SPLITS
LIBIDOMILEAGESOFAR
PHONICSORANGESAZURE
GOOFFONATANGENTROMAN
APSENASHDINERONALD
RANKSPENDLINEN
GNUPOETRYREADINGCPA
LANKERELSOASTHRU
AFFIXELMORAWRECRUIT
STUDBRAINWAVESHOMER
SANDBLASTEVELCLOUDY
DIETSABECOOPS
CHEERSMALEGOOSESTEP
LADLELABORPARTYHATE
ADMITTANCEORGYFICHE
MEATAPENUBSIPHON
SSNJUSTICEFORALLESS
DIANEGATSATOMS
PEANUTDEBTSNAGABBA
EATENFATALATTRACTION
AVERTEVILEYEINFERNO
TESTYDATASETSODDEN

DO THE SPLITS, apt title for introducing spaces into regular phrases for kooky results. I enjoyed GO OFF ON A TAN GENT, and BRA IN WAVES evoked a funny image.

Humor is so subjective. I found some of the resulting phrases stilted, especially POE, TRY READING. Not only grammatically does it feel odd, but I imagine Poe wouldn't have needed much prompting to read. And FAT AL ATTRACTION … something there makes me cringe. Not sure what.

UNFUNDED MANDATE as a base phrase. I vaguely recognized it as a thing, but even after researching it, it still doesn't sing to me.

Some nice long bonus fill, RAW RECRUIT matching well with a TROOPSHIP, and … GOOSESTEP. That last one is a regular term for a common military practice (especially outside America), but boy, does it have uncomfortable connotations. Perhaps recently reading about the siege of Leningrad colored my thinking.

Lynn is so good with her short fill — she usually focuses on Monday puzzles, giving us some of the smoothest Monday offerings around — and today is no different. Although it's a tough task to build a 21x 140-word puzzle — I'd estimate it to be about five times harder than a Monday, since there are necessarily much bigger swaths of white space to fill — this is such a smooth offering.

I did hitch at DAVA, but 1.) all the crossings were fair, 2.) Pulitzer Prize nominee, and 3.) if that's one of the few quasi-gluey bits you end up with, that's a win.

Although most of the themers didn't resonate with me, a few great clues helped to elevate my solve:

  • [Gives an order] made no sense for RANKS until I realized that it wasn't a sergeant giving an order, but a spreadsheet jockey.
  • LADLE delivering a punch sounded like it should be "delivering punch" or "a cup of punch," but I still liked the clever wordplay, nonetheless.
  • ATOMS are indeed at the "heart of the matter" — all matter, to be precise!
Tue 8/16/2016
ARFSPABSTSDAK
SOUPALLAHTOBE
SURFERDUDERYAN
EGOBEETSPOON
THROBROGERMUDD
USBUSOMOE
ACCTMINIOVINE
NARROWLYDEFINED
GRUELICESODDS
EDSDIELIL
REARENDEDPARKS
ADORNSRTAOIL
ALEXARTOODETOO
PERITEENYPOST
ERSEEPEESARKS

Everyone's favorite / most annoying sci-fi bot, R2D2 inspiring today's puzzle, each theme phrase containing a word with two Ds + another with two Rs. Growing up in California and thinking of myself as a surfer (I'm barely passable even on a long board), I loved SURFER DUDE. The rest of the themers were solid, although to Lynn's point, NARROWLY DEFINED felt more dry; like something out of one of my b school textbooks.

Some beautiful long fill today, the conversational DO YOU MIND my favorite — it brings up some interesting imagery. CAR DEALER is a nice two-word phrase too.

People ask me sometimes why I prefer multi-word phrases (as opposed to one-worders) when it comes to long fill. Generally, I find that multi-word phrases tend to be more colorful — putting words together in interesting ways can produce great effect — plus it's fun as a solver to figure out where words break within a phrase.

Contrast DO YOU MIND with ABANDONED, which to me is an everyday piece of language, serving as sort of a nail or screw holding the English language together.

But no doubt, there are definitely great one-word answers. CRUSADERS for example is beautiful, laden with all sorts of historical context and stories about Richard the Lionheart. What a nickname! During my solve, I stopped to admire the answer, wanting to go read up on this subject. To me, that's one mark of what can make for a great piece of long fill.

As usual, a smooth offering from the master of the early-week puzzle. There's just a tad of glue — SDAK, ACCT, SRTA, PERI — which isn't surprising since Lynn uses the "parallel downs" structure in DO YOU MIND / ABANDONED. It's so tough to put two long downs right next to each other like that and come out squeaky clean. Notice where three of the four gluey bits (SDAK, ACCT, PERI) are …

My initial reaction was that I wanted a tighter theme — or more snazzy themers in general — since there are a ton of two-word phrases that fit this D D + R R theme pattern. So it was really nice to hear from Lynn; her self-imposed constraint about having no Ds in the first word or Rs in the second is not something I ever would have thought of. Much tougher than I had thought!

Mon 6/13/2016
SPUREDITDISH
ALSOVISASEDNA
DOUBLEPARKASIS
TREEAMITAFT
UTEDUNCANPHYFE
FERRARICSASAN
ORSOGPALOOTS
CHESTBUMP
SANKAALPEASE
UMAISRUTENSIL
MOTORNEURONASK
ARIAUSBGORE
TOOKFOOLAROUND
RUNEFLAILPLOY
ASSNETTESERE

FOOL AROUND = synonyms for FOOL "wrapped around" phrases. CHEST BUMP is a colorful base phrase — neat that CH/UMP happens to be wrapped around it. And I thought the juxtaposition of MOTOR NEURON and MORON was particularly amusing, the latter not using a ton of the former.

Quite the cabinetmaker, apparently

I wasn't as taken with DORK around DOUBLE PARK. The dictionary definition is "a dull, slow-witted, or socially inept person," but I'm more used to (and partial to) DORK as a compliment, as in "that dorky girl has some serious nerd cred!" Perhaps this explains a lot about me.

DUNCAN PHYFE … whoo, that was a toughie to put together. Thankfully Lynn took her usual care to make all the crossings gettable. I did struggle with the SNIFF AT crossing, but mostly because that PHYFE last name looked so odd. I was curious if any other phrases were available for DUNCE — one I liked was the DEAD CAT BOUNCE, an investing term related to a technical chart pattern. Usually I'd prefer to stay away from nasty-sounding terms, especially ones referring to death, but given that DEATH is already in the grid …

DUE DILIGENCE could have worked too.

Not that DUNCAN PHYFE is bad, but it sure is tough for a Monday and may not do much for non-furniture enthusiasts like myself. I did appreciate that the clue was interesting enough that it made me want to look him up.

I did find it un-Lympelian to get an assortment of crossword glue: CSA, ATA, ASSN, ISR, ENGR, ETTE, and especially SERE. Thankfully it was spread around the grid so it didn't seem overwhelming in any one spot, but as a whole, it was a good bit more than we usually see in her puzzles.

This type of grid arrangement often does cause construction difficulties, what with those four biggish corners plus the fact that so many regions have to interact with two themers. So I did appreciate Lynn working in some nice mid-length fill such as ID SAY SO, SUMATRA, FERRARI. Pretty good use of those 7-letter slots, helping to make up for some of the gluey bits.

POW Mon 3/14/2016
SCATCATTYTBAR
UHUHALOHAHOPI
FETAPLAYWRIGHT
IRONWOODANGIE
KANTSENEDS
SISSYBUTTED
EDUSHAREHOLDER
REBAELUDEMORE
BATTLEFIELDWIN
LEADINOWNED
ALESSEBOZO
LATKEFIREBIRD
GRINDSTONEBLUE
AVEOLARGOLIMB
EASTYIKESYAPS

★ Another fine offering from the early-week master. Today, Lynn takes single words and breaks them into a verb + famous person command, i.e. PLAYWRIGHT gets interpreted as telling Wilbur WRIGHT to PLAY. Fun idea. It's beautiful how Lynn found so many that work with perfect consistency.

Cool logo!

I liked almost all of the themers just as normal words, too. SHAREHOLDER, BATTLEFIELD, GRINDSTONE, FIREBIRD, PLAYWRIGHT are all colorful entries I'd count as assets to any puzzle. That's not often the case with single-word entries! IRONWOOD didn't quite sing for me because I was confused — was it some TV show (I was thinking of "Ironside") or some sort of slang, perhaps for a hybrid golf club (there really ought to be such a thing). It is a pretty interesting term though, a general name for trees known for their hardness.

So much density — six themers is always tough — yet Lynn executes the grid so smoothly. Hardly any short gluey material needed to hold it together. ILIA will be tough for some, but it's a perfectly legit term and the crossings are fair. The grid is well laid-out to ensure smoothness, Lynn wisely stacking PLAYWRIGHT atop IRONWOOD, and FIREBIRD atop GRINDSTONE.

I would have liked more long fill, though. I got BOGGED DOWN by so many short answers in the grid. SUBTLETIES is a nice long entry, and WOBBLY is fun, but there's very little else in terms of answers greater than five letters. Why do I care about this piece of data? Because most short answers have been used over and over again in crosswords, so it's difficult to introduce color through them.

I liked the theme, but I personally would have preferred maybe five or even four themers in order to get some more vivid bonus fill. Still, Monday puzzles which are both super-smooth and also interesting don't come around very often, so I'm happy to give it the POW!

Tue 2/9/2016
TALCHAZYAPOLO
ODINAGUEVIDAL
BOMBSHELLAROSE
ERECTUPSTARTS
YESRAHSEAT
RESETWRECKS
TIMESHARESSHIA
ROADSTIMSHINS
ITCHCHOPSTICKS
MAKEDOSTRAP
ROOFYONJAB
BEARSKINCRUDE
ATRIAEYESHADES
STINGNAPAKEPT
HEDGEDDAYEATS

Another fun early-week puzzle from Lynn. She takes single-word entries and interprets them as double words for kooky results. Really neat to start and end with related themers: BOMBS HELL and EYES HADES. Great find! I've seen a lot of puzzles involving a shifting of the letter S, but this one had a fresh feel to it. As I would expect from Lynn, the themers are consistent, all one word splitting into a kooky two-worders.

This painting looks so much like BOMBS HELL, doesn't it?

Bonus to get six themers. With shortish ones (8-9 letters), it's not so bad to pack six of them in, and Lynn shows us a smart method to do so. She takes her shortest answers (8 and 9 letters) and stacks them in rows 3 and 4 — this lets you treat the grid kind of like you're working with four themers, not six. You just have to be careful about those few overlapping letters — in the top case, the LL of BOMBSHELL and the UP of UPSTARTS — but as long as those letter pairs aren't really weird, like XU or JN or something, that little of an overlap isn't usually a problem.

Making the construction akin to one having only four themers also allows for a bit of long fill. Lynn does well to give us PIRATE SHIP (or is that PIRATE'S HIP?) and RED HERRING (ah, I guess not then).

Lynn's grids are usually so impressively clean that see AGUE and ETTE was unusual. These would be minor blips in most anyone else's grids — although some would argue that AGUE is perfectly fine since it's used in historical writing — but I put the bar quite high for Lynn.

Since that north section is somewhat flexible, I think the allure of the Z in ZULU must have been high. As much as I like rare letters in a grid, I would personally have preferred not including AGUE, favoring something like NOSY/TRUE. Given that Lynn has expertly worked in a J (JUDEA/JAB) so cleanly, that would have been enough in terms of rare letters for me.

Consistent, fun theme with grid execution well above average.

POW Mon 8/24/2015
AMESPLUGCHIDE
MAXIOOZEHASON
ACHESKINDIVING
SHARPEITWEETER
SOUREDCLIFF
SATMAYJUICE
NITECRUSUNTAN
AMIRUSSETSSLY
SAVEUPTAUTUMA
AXELSKITIMP
ETHICSCOTCH
ADAGIOSTHEDOLE
ROMANESQUEEYED
AMINOMUTELOAD
LEDTVEASTAURA

★ I have three criteria I look for in a great Monday puzzle. Let's see how Lynn does:

1.) Theme that doesn't evoke an "Oh, I see that sort of thing all the time." I was utterly baffled as I uncovered the first themer, finding the sequence … USTI? Baffling. I actually went back to make sure I hadn't entered something incorrectly. Even more confusing was to uncover USTI a second time. I wasn't sure if I could enter that string twice more automatically or not, because it looked so strange.

Skin diver ascending

Finally, I hit ITS UP TO YOU … and scratched my head. It took a moment to realize Lynn's wordplay: ITS up to U = write ITS upside-down and have it run up to the letter U. Great, great a-ha, especially for a Monday; a perfect balance of easy enough for beginners and interesting for veteran solvers.

2.) Colorful fill. Even with five themers, I would expect at least two pieces of sizzling fill from a great puzzle. Lynn leaves herself two long slots, and SKIN DIVING / ROMANESQUE are both beautiful entries. Now, with five themers and two long entries, there shouldn't be much room for other long stuff. But Lynn still gives us extras with HAVE FUN, SHAR PEI, TWEETER and KISS ME.

I didn't care for THE DOLE — how often do you hear the phrase without "on"? ON THE DOLE is also a potentially offensive term, so it's not my favorite from that respect either. Slight ding.

3.) Clean short fill. With everything Lynn packs in, I wouldn't be surprised to see a bit of glue to hold it together. AM I and IS IT are partials (more or less), but what else? Some might groan at UMA since she hasn't been in a big role in a long time, and the ARAL Sea gets more coverage in crosswords than it probably deserves, but those are fine by me. Stellar work.

POW Mon 7/6/2015
BAILBALKSACRE
ELLAADIEUHOUR
WALKAROUNDANNE
IMPELSYAPFLA
TOASTPLANAHEAD
CDSONIONPASTE
HESSUPCLESSER
TAKEAPART
CAJOLETAIEROS
OPARTKERRIEVE
MOVEASIDEDICED
CSARIDSENTRA
ATMSKNOCKABOUT
SLAGHANOIERSE
TENTSPENTDYED

★ A fun theme that can appeal to young and old; executed with skill, achieving both smooth and colorful fill. Top notch work.

Man oh man I had a crush on Samantha

I don't expect much out of Monday puzzles, and when I filled in WALK AROUND without even reading the clue (I had most of the crossings), I shrugged. But it was a great a-ha moment when I realized it was actually WALK A ROUND. And my pleasure skyrocketed when discovering PLAN AHEAD was the hilarious PLAN A HEAD!

Clever wordplay is a pleasure to see, and it's especially nice when it's done at a level that almost all solvers can appreciate. I really enjoyed Joel's recent Twitter wordplay, but I did get some shrugs from people who couldn't relate because they didn't know or care about Twitter. Today's puzzle does such a nice job of playing to a wide audience.

Lynn is so tight with her consistency. Five common phrases, with the second word's A broken out. They're all in the same verb tense, and each themer is two words becoming three. Perfect.

Lynn is so careful about avoiding the ugly gluey bits, too. I'm always so impressed at how she manages to keep the number of liabilities down to well under five, and she never uses an egregious one. I have a feeling she stops and resets many a time in order to achieve such silky work.

The four 7x3 stacks in the corners can be difficult to fill with color and smoothness, but Lynn does a nice job of deploying her black squares to make each section manageable. I love that NW corner, with BEWITCH / ALA MODE / ILL PASS — and with all the crossings astonishingly smooth.

The SW corner contains my favorite entry, JAVA MAN, but cramming in COMCAST and APOSTLE does come with a slight compromise in CSA and SGT. CSA is more iffy to me than SGT, since SGT is so common, but CSA is still pretty minor. I also like how Lynn's glue is usually in the three-letter length. A five-letter ugly — ITS NO or SSTAR, for example — is so much more noticeable.

Loved this one.

Mon 2/9/2015
OFLATEHATECPR
BRIDALOXENORE
SUPERBOWLADVIM
EMTPANTMEMO
SPOTCOLDWATER
SYNAPSEORATORS
LEEOLEGUSE
MEADOWLANDS
UFOLOVEMER
PANTENEPYRAMID
SLOWDANCEWADE
USTAALITHIM
RIOWHERESWALDO
GENIAGOLIVEIN
ESEGLOBEXERTS

Beautiful construction today. Parker Lewis and I had coffee the other day, and he mentioned how tough it is to cleanly incorporate five longish theme answers into a 15x. So true, especially when the middle one is 9, 11, or 13 letters long, forcing awkward black square patterns.

Where's Wally? (oh, those kooky Brits)

Lynn if known for her smooth Monday grids, but this one is a cut above. I'd happily hand it to beginner friends as a gateway puzzle. It's got an ESE, plus a MER and a USTA (which could be hard for novices), but the crossings are very fair.

And on top of that, check out how colorful her corners are, typically very tough to get clean in this type of arrangement. COVETOUS, MAHLER, FALSIES, UPSURGE. Not at all FRUMPY!

The connection between WHERES WALDO and anagrammed W-A-L-D-O sequences seems tenuous to me, as I would have imagined more a WALDO hiding diagonally or behind black squares or having red herring W-A-D-L-O and W-A-L-O type strings to hide him. Putting that aside though, Lynn chooses a great assortment of theme answers. SUPER BOWL AD is so timely (although we Seattleites don't need any reminders).

So maybe the theme didn't do much for me, but I found the execution to be DREAMY. (Pete Carroll's slant pass call, not so much.)

Mon 12/22/2014
ELIDECAMPJAG
REMUSASIAPULL
GAPESSHARPEDGE
SPEDAWAYMEDIAN
DAYOREAR
SNITNOTESOBIT
TOMESREMAPRNA
OWEPEDXINGAPR
RANFLEASASKED
MYTHERNSTEENY
ORCSEARP
STOPITSTAMPEDE
PIPEDREAMAIDES
AVIDISLESCAMP
ROECOENSOLON

Nice start to the week from Lynn, featuring four PED XINGs, literally the PED trio of letters crossing in four corners (as highlighted below; so nicely symmetrical!). Fun to have the theme be opaque until hitting that revealer.

I liked the touch of having most of the PEDs be part of long answers, and a few of them related to PED XINGs — I pictured a driver hitting the BRAKE PEDAL upon coming to a PED XING sign. (SPED AWAY … well, we won't go there.) SHARP EDGE and PIPE DREAM are both strong phrases in their own right, and they do a fine job of hiding their respective PEDS.

The grid is nice and clean, too, just an ERGS and an ESO in the liabilities column. It's a nice balance for a Monday puzzle; some sparkle but also smooth as silk.

I might personally have liked a little more ambition in the theme execution, though. I appreciated the long phrases hiding the PEDs — such nice NW and SE corners!) — and I might have given this the POW if all eight of the phrases hiding PED were as long and colorful as PIPE DREAM. Given that PEDXING takes up important real estate in the middle of the grid, that would have been really tough, forcing all sorts of extra constraints, with quite a bit of overlap/interlock between themers. (Maybe a set of themers intersecting PED XING, for example?) This would have almost definitely caused more compromises, but I think the extra snazz could have been worth it. I don't mind a handful of liabilities if I can get more pizzazz.

Finally, loved the clue for SNIT, a playful one simple enough for novice solvers to comprehend and appreciate. [Pique performance?] = a wonderful repurposing of "peak performance." Great to see that type of wordplay in an early-week puzzle.

POW Tue 8/5/2014
COBSHOSTMARSH
ALOEABLEALOHA
PETERSOUTCAMRY
NOTSOERRSDEED
LAMBPATSDOWN
BREWPUBALI
OAFSGISTINSEL
NNEJACKSUPOXO
ODDJOBYETOREO
AGOTEMPEST
MARKSOFFSAUL
IDEASALTGLOSS
LIARSCARRIESON
NORTHERIENEHI
ESSAYTEMPTROT

★ Wonderful puzzle today. How Lynn found five normal phrases to fit this theme is beyond me. JACKS UP, for example, is such a great base phrase (as in a store jacking up prices), plus it can be read as "Jack's up!" Beautiful idea with five solid themers.

It's also a perfect example of adding pizzazz into a puzzle without having to resort to a lot of long fill. Sure, there's the nice SORE LOSER and BOTTLE FED and BUGABOOS, but what really impresses me is Lynn's careful eye for the shorter stuff. ODD JOB. BREW PUB. JAKARTA. ALADDIN. Putting together a crossword is hard enough that sometimes it feels like a small miracle just to get a grid filled using regular words you can gloss over like… well, like GLOSS. I love it when a constructor grabs hold of each step of the filling process, carefully sorting through many options before landing on opulent words… like… like MAGI.

I like to eyeball a grid even before I start solving, and it's almost always a good sign to see white space apportioned out like this. There's nothing too big (making for a challenging fill) or too small (sectioned off areas can make for a choppy solving experience). Just right. At 78 words it hits the maximum allowed number of answers, but that matters not one bit to me. Using 76 or even 74 words can often allow for some really nice long fill, but Lynn shows that you can give a quality solving experience in 78 words too. It just takes more care, which she clearly put in here.

Finally, look how smooth the short fill is. So little to even point out. OLEO is an outdated product, but you do still see the word on some dairy aisle boxes. And NEHI may be a brand gone by the wayside, but I have fond memories of Radar O'Reilly drinking Grape Nehis on M*A*S*H. Outstanding work; bravo.

Mon 7/7/2014
BRAGDAWGPOTS
MALEOKIELATHE
WHITEWASHONION
SSSPRICECUT
BELATEDISIT
ELITEERGSTRAP
AIMEPEEUSAUSA
USBMINDSETNPR
THEISTYODAOIL
YARNICEDTRURO
FLEASWEATER
EXTRADRYELS
DROOPHONEYCOMB
EARNSOWEDAREA
NYETPLOYLEWD

A few months ago, I joined CrosSynergy, a syndicate of crossword constructors providing daily puzzles for the Washington Post. Bob Klahn, who runs the group, has been extremely helpful in getting me oriented, and Lynn (a long-time CS member) has been great as well. It's been a nice reminder to me how important it is to know your audience. I had started by aiming too hard, since that's 1.) the type of puzzle I like, and 2.) NYT-ish. It was great to get the feedback that for the WP daily solver, I was making (cluing, especially) puzzles way too tricksy. Thanks, Lynn!

Onto the puzzle. I like how Lynn casually commented how yeah, maybe she'd toss in BEAUTY / PARLOR. Typically it's difficult to do such a thing, especially in the method she used. Placing that pair of answers on the west and east sides of the puzzle constrains them quite a lot, and that can often require glue-y fill to execute. But look how beautiful that west section came out. Maybe THEIST isn't a "Monday-ish" word to some, but I'll reiterate my point about knowing your audience. A NYT reader might not be expected to know this word, but shouldn't an educated person be expected to know the word "theology"? It's not a big step from theology to THEIST. And ELISHA Cuthbert may not be someone everyone knows, but she's a costar of a pretty popular TV show ("24"). Plus, Lynn's been very careful to make the crossing answers transparent.

The east side isn't as pretty to me, as TRURO strikes me as both 1.) one of those names that either you know or you don't and 2.) a bit esoteric, especially for West Coasties like myself. That said, Lynn's been careful to make the crosses very gettable, so I don't find it unfair. Just not as elegant as the west section. Simply my opinion, of course.

I personally had a tough time grokking the theme, as the sequence WASH, CUT, SET, DRY, COMB is much more complicated than my personal system (CUT). But I liked seeing that sequence after finishing the solve. As Lynn mentioned, fun to get that a-ha moment. I unfortunately stumbled upon BEAUTY and guessed PARLOR very early on, so it didn't have quite that impact I would have liked. That's why I prefer to have revealers (if they're necessary, and here I think Lynn made a good decision since it's a Monday puzzle) toward the end of the puzzle, where you won't accidentally run into them. Fitting in BEAUTY PARLOR at the end is not easy, though, especially considering Lynn's already high theme density.

What with the very high theme density (five themers plus BEAUTY / PARLOR, it's not surprising to see a few rough spots. The center in particular struck me, what with ERGS, EPEE, and REDYE all crunched up. Perhaps I wouldn't have thought as much about it if the theme hadn't been about the BEAUTY PARLOR. As it was, I had a hitch, wondering if REDYE was a secret Easter egg or a bit of accidental themage?

Finally, I really enjoyed the clue for YARN, especially given that Monday clues tend to be straightforward by necessity. Not only is it playful, but it might subconsciously give a little lift to a solver at the beginning of a work week. I think it's fun to aim for that in generally, personally. What should crossword puzzles be, if not uplifting? As with this clue, I had a ball with Lynn's puzzle.

Mon 5/5/2014
USBAPPSWAFTS
AQUAPERUOLLIE
WURLITZERORGANS
IRANOGREGMT
TRINILOPEZAMIE
AMTTUXDORMANT
BYOBSEEPINES
JOHNADAMS
ORSONURNHILT
LIPREADAKAMAP
ECONLAUGHTRACK
MONISNTIAGO
ITSABOUTNOTHING
STORMBEANSNIT
SARISERGOECO

Not much that I like better than a Seinfeld reference. A puzzle about nothing! Great idea. Lynn, the master of Mondays, gives us themers with synonyms for "nothing" hidden within four phrases.

And what beautiful phrases! "Words hidden within phrases" type themes often depend on the quality of the theme answers, and Lynn has chosen some stellar ones. I know it more as "The Mighty Wurlitzer" but WURLITZER ORGANS Googles nicely. TRINI LOPEZ wasn't familiar to me right away, but he should have been (chalk one up to the giant hole in my pop music knowledge base). Add JOHN ADAMS with a nice piece of trivia about the White House, finish it off with a LAUGH TRACK, and you have some snappy entries.

Fill is quite nice too, as I would expect from Lynn. Even with five themers, Lynn does a great job of laying out her skeleton and taking full advantage of her 7's: SQUIRMY, BURRITO, TIN MINE, OLE MISS, LACONIC. What a fantastic array of mid-length fill. And to pull it off with just an ALG here, a TPK there, with the assorted MON / AMT / INIT stuff is aces in my book.

Ah, the punchline. As with any joke, the delivery is key. I recognize that ITS ABOUT NOTHING is a direct quote from the man himself, George Costanza, but it felt off to me. The puzzle themers "contain nothing" but aren't really "about nothing." I know it seems semantic, but I thought it could have packed more punch if the revealer had been something to the effect of NOTHING IN HERE (is there a snappier way to express that?) or if the themers had all been slang terms for nothing, like BUPKUS / GOOSE EGG / BAGEL etc.

Final comment, the clue for USB felt off to me (ADDED NOTE: Jim pointed out that it's actually precisely accurate. I say, what does he know? Given that he works at Microsoft. And programmed the original Freecell. And is high up in the Windows 8 chain. Ah. Right.), which is unfortunate as 1-Across often sets the tone (consciously or subconsciously) for the puzzle. First of all, I wasn't sure why it needed the (Abbr.) tag, since PC already indicated an acronym or shortening. And more to the point, a "USB PORT" feels more like a "connection means" to me than just "USB." Alternately, [PC connection standard] would have felt better to me. Again, it's the fault my linguistic anality (and the eensy weensy fact that I was approximately 0% correct), but I stared at the NW for way too long before moving on.

Very tough puzzle for a Monday, but in a good way. Nothing esoteric, lots of great fill, clean, and the snazziness was most welcome. Well done.

POW Mon 1/13/2014
OFFERPLUSCOP
NOLTEEONSEROS
TREATPHONECALL
HAWIOTAVILLA
ESSRHONEVALLEY
GOOSESAIDYDS
ONLYSERIES
GONEBALLISTIC
CALMLYERAS
FARSOBFAMINE
STONEWALLEDSIP
TOMEIOUZOHST
ONEANDALLPASTE
PARTACLUTWEET
LOOBESSSEARS

★ An absolutely beauty of a Monday puzzle. It has everything I personally look for: 1.) innovative theme, 2.) spicy long fill and 3.) fill accessible to the novice (little to no ugly stuff). There's more good stuff coming up this week, but Monday constructions are perhaps the hardest type to pull off well, and Lynn's nailed it.

The theme isn't necessarily ground-breaking, but it contains an added level of complexity which helps makes it more interesting for the experienced solver. We see a lot of puzzles where a certain word is hidden within theme phrases, but having two words hidden helps to distinguish it.

And with five long theme entries, I'd expect to see a lack of good long fill and a lot of short ugly stuff. Lynn has done something unusual, shoving her top two entries into one region of the grid (instead of spreading them out, one to the left and one to the right). That usually creates difficulties in filling such a dense area, but she makes it look easy. Having a five-letter word sandwiched by theme entries (VILLA between PHONE CALL and RHONE VALLEY, and TOMEI between STONEWALLED and ONE AND ALL) often will result in bad fill due to the severe constraints, but she uses a set of cheaters in the very NE and SW to smooth things out. I fully approve — as Patrick Berry has said many a time, he'd always choose to use cheaters if it results in better fill.

The grid arrangement allows Lynn huge flexibility in the NW and SE corners (the theme answers barely constrain her at all in these regions), and look at all the goodness she's packed in there. ON THE GO / FOR A SONG / FLEW SOLO all in parallel, with only ESS as a (very minor) blight? Yes, please! I didn't notice any really bad fill as I solved, nor did I notice anything even with a careful scan afterward. A stonker of a job.

Uber-professional work, a total pleasure to solve; a near-perfect Monday puzzle. Beautiful start to the week.

Tue 8/6/2013
ASSDISCSWISS
DAKSERTAPINTA
DYETAKECHANCES
UNTIEITADAMS
POCKETKNIVES
HERONERODES
ELBATOREARENA
BOOCOPCARSMVP
ALOHAFATEBOYS
YAKIMAUNION
PINCHPENNIES
IRISNRAUNZIP
LIFTWEIGHTSIDA
LOSERMAMIENET
STORYPROPGRE
Tue 4/30/2013
PENSSCRAMSPOE
ARIATHEMETEND
WINSBYANOSEJUG
SEASALTSANJOSE
BUSTOAR
DENNYSETCBATS
ELANDSQUATTIP
NOTWOSOUNDALIKE
CPUCUTIEKEVIN
HERBESLDETEST
EEGAFRO
LOWDOSELOUSEUP
IRAYOUCANTLOSE
CALAFRAMEANTE
ELKSTORESTSAR
Mon 8/6/2012
MESSACTICASA
ANTECOONGALEN
CRAPSHOOTELLEN
HOTTIEFEATATE
ONSETBALLOTBOX
TELLSAVEO
ASSSITSENACT
BANKRUNCORNROW
SWINEICESDNA
FEDSANSEL
LIFECYCLEROAST
ENSESSOSINNER
ATOLLPRICEDIVE
CRUELAIDAOMEN
HATENEONNERD
Mon 7/23/2012
APSEHASTEAWED
LITEERNIECOVE
OXYGENTANKCREW
HALASIFVERNE
AREASSUCHAPITY
CERTHUNTS
SORTIEDABOVA
THEINVISIBLEMAN
PODALLLATELY
PALMSSECT
FELLAPARTKEATS
SCALPAONEBOA
TONEHINDUDEITY
OLEGASIGNODES
PETETONYSNEMO
Tue 5/8/2012
ATBAYSHUSHTBA
BRACEPUREEARM
BESTSHELLERKIA
AXELAWLOMENS
IFSALIASES
PICKUPSHTICKS
OOHEDCOOLETTU
DWIDURANTEOAS
SAVESEREMACYS
ALLDAYSHUCKER
WILLIAMESC
EGRETOHMUCLA
ILOMARRYINSHAM
LOUUNCAPSEIZE
LOSSTALEASPEN
Mon 4/16/2012
METASSNIECES
MANEBOAOOLALA
ORGSSTUDMUFFIN
AGATEDEAEEK
BIGENCHILADA
NEEDLEMATZOH
JAMSELALWEARY
OLEGOODEGGSAP
HINDUTOGAPINE
NATUREURGING
HUMANPRETZEL
ASHPRELEERY
SWEETIEPIEOBIE
PARLORADDURNS
STRIPELOTSAD
Mon 4/2/2012
APARTDEBSSIS
PRIESALAILIMP
PORCHSWINGEXPO
SPYRINGMATTER
URLSMASHHIT
PLAITDUOPEG
LINTTUBULEROB
AMYBULLRUNABA
YAOOGLINGIDOL
LAYEMSKNEEL
MUDSLIDEMID
ANTHEMEASYWIN
ILIEPIANOSCORE
DIMSLORDMARKS
STEYUKSERNST
Mon 3/12/2012
ACHTONGSOFFER
RNAONIONRAISA
NOVMOLDEDGLASS
ATEATSEESTOP
ZEALOTSZANE
HAMMEREDSTEEL
CHESAGOATARI
LOANNASALOSLO
APRONICONYEN
PETRIFIEDWOOD
TALCCENSORS
SUCHOEDUSEUP
CRUSHEDROCKSNL
AGREEUNDUEIII
RELAXPOETSTNT
Wed 2/8/2012
FRAUDSEARCOTS
ANDSOORCAAFEW
BASSRELIEFNCAA
RELICSTOAT
ALGMIDASSTOUCH
ROOMIESITERTE
IKEASTINTS
DISCUSSTHROWERS
BERTHSANAT
UVAAYEAWESOME
SINGLESSBARTSP
ORALSAUTOS
PINEBUSSTICKET
ELANASHECALVE
NESSHEADAMMAN
Mon 10/24/2011
ISLEBALMYTBSP
DIETILIADRATA
INTHEDUMPSIRAS
TIERMOODARNS
PATROLUTILIZE
AXLDOWNTHEROAD
PEIEPEEEDU
ASEABITNYPD
IANGRABOLE
OVERTHEHILLGEL
TEABALLFACIAL
OCTADOHSNABS
OTISUPTHECREEK
LONEMETOOLADY
ERGSASPENAROD
Mon 6/20/2011
HASSLEARLOMAY
ACTUALRAIDOVA
THINSKINNEDTON
CONKSNODSWONK
HOGIMPOTTER
MEALYMOUTHED
CHIARAEGLORY
HUNTCYNICAMIE
ELSIETSANEED
FAINTHEARTED
DECAYAOLAGA
SMEEMEREERRED
TAJLILYLIVERED
AGOALEEDEPOSE
BIBBLTSSNOWED
Mon 4/4/2011
DEBSDANESACCT
AARPVERVESOUR
BRAINDRAINANTI
LIKESOTEAFIN
RYDERBACKPACK
TOEOKRAARABLE
ENDSIONSONSET
HANDSTAND
ASHESSHUNAILS
SWEEPSENYAROE
HAIRCARECLONE
AHSACEOUTING
MIMEHEARTSMART
ELANESTEEAGUA
DINGTEEMSSEND
Mon 2/14/2011
BALMMACBRAVO
AREAICESREVEL
ICANTSTOPLOVING
TSHIRTSRAWSTA
LOAAIMS
IMWALKINGBEHIND
DIELENDSURER
TABSSKILLBASE
AMENDROUTQTS
GIRLIMGONNAMISS
SOONCHE
BAGONOCHOOSES
ONLYWANNABEWITH
ONIONSILOETTU
REBUSBMXDEAN
Mon 2/7/2011
PECKCHAPFSTOP
OSHABOREATARI
STATSTIRFRYING
TULIPSKIMLAP
WAKEFORESTDOTE
ARICROSIREN
RYESATTACKS
ROLLOVERACD
LIBRARYOAFS
GENIEIPOYOW
AXEDSTRETCHBRA
UPCARIATAROT
GETUPANDGOLENT
ERASETINYLACE
STRADSOULEKED
Mon 10/18/2010
UMPSOHARAMYRA
SIREAMBERPEEP
USEDFOSTERHOME
REMAPEAUMAX
PRINCIPALSCARE
ELSSTILLSINKS
DYESSNLAIR
SUMMERPLACE
PIEIIIALES
WIRESMSNBCONE
INERTRESIDENCE
ISPESTSAGAS
FIELDHOUSETARO
IDLEOASISETTU
TESTODORSNEAT
Mon 6/7/2010
RILESWOODSJUT
ARIELATBATUNE
COOKINGTIMESTA
INNPIEIOTAS
EMIRBROKENHOME
RAZORSPITSUET
NEMODENNYTDS
POKERGAME
LAPTUNASCURE
OARSRITSARONG
SMOKEDMEATOUZO
TIMIDSOLGYN
ALIITSOKWITHME
RNSCRUDERULER
TEETYPEDABYSS
Mon 4/26/2010
HOPISCOTFLAW
OVALSEONSROSA
SINEWPACKLIGHT
ENDANISEONSET
DEADHEATHUG
BAITMODELTS
SPELLOARSYOU
PLAYINGWITHFIRE
CARILLSAUNTS
ATSTAKEOLEG
ICEOLDFLAME
SPADEKNEEDWAX
HOLYSMOKEAMANA
URDUCOEDYOKEL
LEAPSKYSBEST
Mon 2/15/2010
DORMDADAENDOW
EDIEOPALMIAMI
MINDINTHEGUTTER
INDIRALSUWANE
COLDSKI
HANDINTHETILL
SCARYROUENCIA
ELSESERFSGINS
LETDECAFTREKS
FOOTINTHEDOOR
ODDTOWS
CAMPOATTESTEE
HEADINTHECLOUDS
ARDORMAYOUNIT
DODGESTEMTATA
Mon 11/9/2009
AGENTCASTOGLE
TONEROTTOLIES
HASTYCOUGHDROP
ELIAOLATILT
NIGHTFALLMETAL
SENIORSESLARE
TRITAUALDA
KITCHENSINK
EMITAAAPVT
PENCNNWEASELS
ANGLOSKINNYDIP
TSARSANDINA
THINKTANKAMBER
OOZEEDGEMILNE
OLESTOADPRESS
Mon 10/19/2009
LIMOBAWLWHIM
ODOROBOESHONE
BOONDOCKSHOODS
NORMSSERAPES
COSTASEGALEE
ASHNEUTRONADS
BLOCKAGEIKE
SOTSSHEDSABED
TEEPETSTORE
NETGOULASHUSC
EDURUNEORFEO
PICKETSSERIF
ASSETOOHANDAAH
LOONSLEISENDS
INNSDRATSTAT
Mon 9/28/2009
REMRAWEGGADDS
ELIAZALEACRAP
COLDTURKEYRUDY
OILIERZEROG
USERETTEABBOT
PEREZOARMAUVE
RATONBATSIN
REFMILKDUDTDS
ADLIBSTUNAS
UNITEJOENASAL
LAPAZOPTSHOPI
FLIESALINES
MALICHERRYBOMB
BLOCRESIGNREO
ALPSUSOPENANN
Sun 7/19/2009 YOU ARE THERE
DECKUSDAGIBEESSAY
IVANASTEMCELLSCOUPE
MANORBURYALLACCOUNTS
CARTSPELTSSAINT
FURRYCOOKDEPTHTTP
RAYORRACMEEYESORE
ATISSUEIGUANASREWED
MENTORSPARLORINANER
ESTRUSCURRATIONSWBO
HEPPOTIDEALSTIOS
VEEDELKEYDDTITA
LIMPVALUEDENSNTH
ICUURSINEWAVEWAHOOS
MERITSDIPOLEDENEUVE
PRINEREVELERINASTEW
IONESCOARFSTEDPRE
DYESCALCOHMYGOURD
CANDOBOOZESUPRA
HOURLYMATRIMONYTRITE
AESOPAMBULANCESATES
GROWSPSATNEETHYDE
Tue 7/7/2009
REAMFELLSBRA
ANVILLASSORAM
JOESATURDAYYIP
ACROBATTBILLS
SHYOMEGAESC
FREDRICAPRIL
NOTESEDENEDU
ELANANNANEELS
REXPLODUNMET
DORISEVENING
ERAALLOTBAN
TALENTETRURIA
ELIDONNAAUTUMN
AGEQUIPSEATEN
RAFSTARTHEDY
Fri 6/26/2009
FLATCAPPDOGES
LIVEDALIEEVENT
AAAMEMBERREEVE
INSPADESBARKIN
LATEFEESAIDSO
RENCOLLOQUY
ARDENGOADSUSO
LENDCAMPYBALK
FDASITBYREDYE
ASSUAGESBUN
QANTASGANGWAR
FUMIERFORSHAME
LAPSEMARRIAGES
ORLONGREENZONE
PEENSMENDINST
Mon 3/16/2009
MAOARTSJOINTS
ARRIVEATAGREED
SIGMACHIMAITAI
TEASOOPSUSSR
SSNKNEEHIGH
MOINUDEMDS
ALUMNADSTCOAT
WISEGUYHAIRDYE
ERINRAWGLUEON
SACPAPALDL
CLEARSKYPRE
LISATHEOALOT
MUDPIEEVANBAYH
INLANDRELIANCE
AGENTSORALEEL
Mon 3/2/2009
EERIETRAMPGPA
SPURSEASYAOED
PINKPANTHERLPS
TRINIBREADS
COINREGISRBIS
SMOGWARNBRUCE
TETSARILOGON
PURPLECOW
ACRIDLILTBOO
TREKSNEROSEXY
MODECASESTAIL
UPROOTELAND
ITOWHITERABBIT
RONNAVELPLAZA
ANYSNEAKSEGER
Mon 1/12/2009
CPAPLAYANSEL
OILSDOMESCHMO
MAIMQUILTPIECE
INTOWSLYSLEW
COOKIESHAPEFEE
EGGOTOTAL
ARODASKTRIMS
PAPERDOLLOUTFIT
TEPEEMAPSEXY
OLMECKEPT
MASSTORECOUPON
EZIONAHIDOLS
CUTTHATOUTINDY
CRETEEDGEODIN
AESOPDAHLSEC
Mon 12/22/2008
TEMPTAPSTRAMP
ALOUNILEHANOI
RABBITRUNOWNUP
OLSENMARDOSE
CRICKETPLAYER
METTLEEMIT
DENYELMNASTY
ONEHOPTOITPIE
GUSTOSPAHIPS
ARABEGRETS
KANGAROOCOURT
ALASCODTBONE
PITASTOADSTOOL
UNCLEERMAENDS
TEHEEESPNASEA
Wed 9/24/2008
BIMBOALAMOHOW
AMOURNAVALODE
HUMMINGBIRDLID
SAMOASAMRYES
ELMSROBOT
ITSREALLYTIMEHE
MRISTOEBARED
PARHEADSRAG
EDGARPALFORE
LEARNEDTHEWORDS
LIANALEER
JOADDYEVESTA
OOHGEORGEBURNS
WPAMANIAIRATE
LSDTREKSTEPEE
Tue 7/22/2008
MEOWSTHEDASAD
ATRIADUNESCRY
CHANTSNACKRACE
ATTICMOSUL
SNORELOSERSPAM
TORYEVILTHETA
SLYIRISDEEDED
SNIDELINE
ZIPLOCNEATRPM
ELLENLOADAERO
ELIATURKEYSNUB
AZTECMETED
BABYSNITSAUGER
OWLASTERSTENO
WEEREEDSTESTY
Mon 6/30/2008
PREKBENCHCALL
HONEECOLIOREO
DURANDURANSTEW
STATUSSDIURI
GODMOSULIRAQ
ITINERARYLOOTS
SANENDSET
HIGHWAYENTRANCE
TIPRCAAHA
SPITZTEATASTER
GRAPESODAHOI
TAGNIBDENOTE
MIROFOUNDMONEY
ASEATOSCARARE
JEERSTORYALMS
Mon 2/18/2008
BOBUPFLUBGEAR
ABASEIOTAOMNI
LIBERALBENEFITS
KEYFLIESVERSE
LEIAPER
RADICALSIGNALT
ALERTSMEATSTEW
ILIAOARLANA
NOTSOFARPOURIN
STYLEFTHANGING
ADZAYES
STYLEPATTYHAT
PROGRESSIVELENS
IOWALAINAORTA
NYSESTAGRYDER
Mon 1/7/2008
PARERSBYECBS
ABILENEOAKTREE
POPFOULOPERATE
EDUBALMSISAN
REPELNETRAH
SAIDNOADDED
DOCTORSWANIDO
ERRATICNESTEGG
ALAISLEROUTES
LYCRAAPLOMB
KINPEASEEMS
BASSSTEMSVII
ACHEFORBIGBANG
DIORAMASPIEDON
EDTREPSNEERS
Sun 1/6/2008 THE INSIDE DOPE
PAPALNACREMESHFLEW
AGATEFLAIRAREALORE
COCOAFLAVORCOTSAURA
GILDANETGASSTATION
FLUBDECORFENNELS
AMIPLACIDODOMINGO
WACSELANLONERSTSAR
ACHESIDSATIREMEESE
SAUNAGRIPETTUETA
HUMORONESELFOARMIR
PRIMSHROUDSLATE
SIBOASMASONICLODGE
OVASNOGEDAMSQUAB
SACCOLISLESPAMUNTO
ANKAMIGUELSAGEECOL
READINGBATTERYERA
ACCOSTSDIANEGARR
FALLOUTFITYEAEMOTE
ORALRARAWORLDSAPART
OGREETALENEMYHEINE
TOADDENSTERSEARNEL
Mon 12/31/2007
SCADSVASTBLEW
KOREAARIALEAH
IRONFILINGONCE
DAMENIDSOOTHE
SLANTEDLAUD
AIRSPLITSUP
THEMETAGEYORE
HEXESCIASPLAT
ERICCONSPIELS
NOTAWHITWIN
LOONCARGOES
ANGLERCOMAMRI
BALITOPBILLING
EDENLIAREATIN
TANGELSADOSES
Mon 12/10/2007
WALSHKENPSST
ATARIARCHALTO
SPRINGROLLDIAN
HAGTOSCASUNNY
ROTATEIDTAG
STINGRAYSPA
ELSATARMESHES
DOWRYLEASTORK
ARISESGUMATMS
MENSINGSONG
GEESETRUSTS
DIVASSCRODWPA
AMOSSTRINGBEAN
DATEPLEAERECT
AXEDYEWDANES
Mon 11/19/2007
WISPCRIPESTIM
ALOEDENALIONE
FIFTHCOLUMNPAL
TETRAELIVILE
TOILETARTICLE
TROLLEDAVA
IOUSAGESALIBI
LOCHPAPERSNUB
ETHANRADIOTRI
IFSGOPHERS
SCARLETLETTER
MANYROEISLAM
INNBESTPICTURE
TOEUNCOOLODIE
HEXBEANIENEAT
Mon 10/22/2007
ADDSDOWNBOBS
DIRTMACHOLARK
UVEAACHESOKAY
LAWRENCEWELK
TNTLIARJEERAT
HULAGODACE
RTESCLAMBISQUE
ARLESOSENAURU
FAIRAMOUNTHEAP
TINLETHILL
SLEETSFLEDWPA
LITTLEBOPEEP
MAUIIRATEALAS
RAZZZEROSACRE
SHIAOXENRHYS
Fri 10/5/2007
DENSEFOGAPLOMB
EXITLANEPREMIE
BENEDICTTENANT
SCORELESSSTRUT
OSSCELSSTE
SPLITSADIEHER
LEADSPRATSAMI
EATSHARTEBRAD
ESEDORIESEIRE
PHIEAREDKAFKA
TENCLODMAS
ILLERWATERPIPE
GLIDERWARZONES
HEFNERAPIARIES
TREADSYATITTLE
Mon 8/20/2007
SALEMUSEREMMA
OBAMAPAGEREAL
LITTLEPIGSONCE
EDTAPEDPITIES
SEESREDDIDIN
EKETITICACA
AMBLETREETAR
BILLYGOATSGRUFF
ELIROCSLOBES
DONTWALKMIA
DRATSSATDOWN
HOMAGENARCMAO
AVIDFRENCHHENS
LACEUNITEAGLE
FLEDLANASTAYS
Mon 2/12/2007
ASCOTCUBSHASP
CHOREISEEOTTO
CAPRACONGEREEL
ELYCOETABAVA
PLETHORABASIN
TODOHONDANEED
SWISSTEMPT
THINGAMAJIG
ISAACSORES
BOMBTYINGCONE
OCEANDONSHULA
ITSOAKRUMNAB
LASTDANCEANDRE
EVESREDSSIEGE
DESKPESTHARES
Thu 12/21/2006
ZEROSCHESTREP
ELUDEHUETHEDA
DEMONKINGREVUP
GIRDEDBODICE
BANREDREMOVER
ANAKINEELWEDS
ATTICANNOY
EMBOSSTWEED
MUTESALIKE
SPAMSRSGRIPES
TATERTOTEMLYE
RELAYSWATSON
ELANDBRINGEMON
ELSIEINNIRATE
PATERBAGFATED
Fri 11/10/2006
BASKETCASEDECO
OTHERWOMANAROD
GARAGESALERUDD
AXESEISMWIPES
RIDSDESIINTWO
TASERSENDSIOC
ROYSEATWORK
SCRUBUPOFFENDS
CRIMELABTUB
RENSELESLETBE
ANGLOMAMARILL
BETONTRENDRAD
BLOGARCADEGAME
LENADEARREADER
EDENJETSETTERS
Mon 9/25/2006
BAATERMWRESTS
ELLALEEEARTHA
REGLAVENDEROIL
GRAPENUTSANNE
STERNESCNNE
ITSHOTTUB
SPASNISSANONA
PLUMTUCKEREDOUT
COTOBEYEDELMS
ADOPTSYEP
POEAWEMORON
STATLILACTIME
PURPLEPROSEPEI
UNTIESEPEEEGG
RESETSDEADNAH
Mon 9/11/2006
MICEMAIMSRAJA
ASEAARDENEVER
RENTNEEDLEWORK
XESKITEDTANKS
OPRAHLAHR
HURRICANELAMP
ESSESERINLOA
ASHYTOASTPAIL
TRISHUTSAYNO
POTATOPANCAKE
NEILEDITS
ABIDEAESOPCOE
FACEPOWDERSEXY
ALECTRITEKNEE
RISKBYEARYENS
Mon 8/7/2006
GEMAMASSSPIRE
ORERUPEEAURAL
FIRSTSEEDGNOME
OCCULTTAOCNBC
RAISEDONTSHOOT
ISPYTRIX
PIPESTEMSNIPE
CALARUBADEL
SNAREGOLDLEAF
YUKSNEAL
GIMMEABUDNATCH
ROOMWARIGNORE
ANNANMAYFLOWER
SIEGEBLASEEAT
PAYEEASTORDMZ
Mon 4/24/2006
OPRAHDIESACTS
CLONEROTCCURT
CAPNCRUNCHOBIE
UTEKEGSONRAMP
RESOLESGOON
REDHANDSOME
SPEARPETEQUAY
WORNSEDERUSSR
AGOGPEGSBATHE
NOSEDIVETIS
CUKEFOGHORN
CHARGETOROMOO
LULULEMONTWIST
AGESEGADRETIE
POSHEONSYESES
Mon 4/3/2006
CHASMJADEACME
AERIEOWENBRAD
GEORGESANDBILE
ELSACHYZOOMIN
SEETHENOLTE
WOODWINDWOW
RUBENACESABA
EGOSFAXESEVIL
ELMPAVESLEEK
FIBACIDROCK
SEWEDABUSED
ATHANDATOMVIP
LEERONTHEBEACH
TELLFETEADDED
ONLYFOURGUESS
Tue 3/14/2006
MOTHSHELBOGIE
AREAPERUORNOT
SEMIFINALOZAWA
TOPGUNSUBTOTAL
SSTREMSAL
NOSIRREDHOT
UTTERAUTOGRAPH
MOORAMMANELIA
PROVISIONVALET
SILENTRYDER
ORCAIRPUP
ANTEROOMESCAPE
GOURDCONTENDER
EUBIEKAYEBUNK
SNEERSTUDCADS
Tue 1/3/2006
LORDJEANSCHMO
OPUSABLECHURN
WHITESALEROSIE
MENROYSLEPT
ALISONCOLESLAW
SINUSCONANEYE
SAGSPANMESSES
HEADSTART
LARIATIRSOAKS
ABETANGYAMPLE
BUCKSKINTIPPER
ANAISKIMREP
ALLOWSANDSTONE
DELTAALOEOVEN
SISSYNIBSTEXT
Mon 10/24/2005
CLUBSHELFELKS
LINEHOMERLEAK
ELIEALIVEFAZE
FITTOBETIEDSOW
RUBSPATHOS
CHEERYERASE
HOLDSCRASHDIET
EPADOWNSHAH
FINALEDITABOVE
LINENUSOPEN
THRIFTOSHA
AAATURNTHETIDE
GIZAROUTEMAID
UKESELDERAGED
PUSHSEERSNOSY
Mon 9/5/2005
SHAQSHIPSGABS
PERUPEROTOPAL
ANTEARMORMENU
BARBARABOXER
ETHELEWER
JOECOCKERDRAMS
ERATAILDEADON
CERFSNIPEHATE
TUTORSZASUGEE
SPYRIMARKSPITZ
SNCCAROSE
ITSADOGSLIFE
TACKDRAINPRAM
CLUEAARONPOLO
HEMSSWANSYELP
Mon 8/22/2005
ZAPPAPASHAJET
ETHANISLETORE
BEATTHEHEATSIN
RUSHEEWRITHED
APESRCATRI
SEALTHEDEAL
PLUMESIRSBARE
RERUNTBASIREN
OVALSLAGATLAS
FILLTHEBILL
AHAACEMAYS
AFGHANSCLIQUE
FLUTAKETHECAKE
REFINAWEARBOR
OAFSATEDROANS
Mon 8/15/2005
EMIRMODEMABC
MISERABOVETOO
UNEMOTIONALLOP
STEAMYESSMAZE
PESOSIRISES
ASHRODAVER
MNEMONICDEVICES
MAMAOOHARIA
OPPORTUNEMOMENT
RYESRANWEE
SPHINXKEYED
HOESTAUADORED
AKAFINDINGNEMO
REDELTONEUBIE
PRYWEISSTATS
Mon 7/25/2005
JIBESHARIEKED
USESTOXINDELE
SWEPTASIDEAPSE
TETAGESPESTER
SALMONTUNA
OREOAVIDRETRO
BOTANYERICA
UPSPEPTALKTAR
PATTIORDEAL
CLARAROSAEACH
MITTRATTLE
RIPLEYMANXTAD
ONTOPTAMEETING
BRAGEAGERURGE
SEXYSPINSBESS
Mon 5/30/2005
ABYSSSODALGA
SOOTHEUNOVIED
PIGOUTDUCKINTO
SLAPHISSNADIR
SPECAERATE
SQUIRRELAWAY
PURGERILEDZIG
RAINFIELDEURO
YDSBINGEIGLOO
MONKEYAROUND
ASPIREEDAM
THESEWISEAGRA
WOLFDOWNPONYUP
ANTIPINTRIPLE
RESTTISBASES
Tue 8/24/2004
EAGLECAMPRANK
MORONAWOLODIE
BRANDONAMEMANY
ETSGREYTHAMES
RASCALSSHIN
AMYPHOTOOPS
PASTEHAIRFLAT
AUTOBERRAOGLE
CRABEASTGRASP
TABULATESOU
RICHCLAMSUP
LENGTHGOALPRO
IDOLBONOVOYAGE
AGRAURALNOTES
REARMEWSGUSSY
Mon 6/7/2004
LOYALCAPSKISS
IRENEASHEACME
DELTAMEANTOOT
SOLIDREASONING
PERERIE
LIQUIDASSETSAY
USURPSHISYALE
CAINEFINHOWLS
CATSHIPHOGTIE
ICEGASSTATIONS
POSHIMP
WHATSTHEMATTER
JAILLAIRNAIVE
IDLEEIRETUNES
METSSLEDSTART
Mon 10/20/2003
PACTSGREWJOBS
ECOLERULEABET
CHICAGOILLCOLA
KENLEONLIKELY
SIAMGROSSES
METEORSEETO
APIANCANAANITE
RENTMOVEDMORN
TESTPILOTTINED
LAXERTOSSES
SPHERESTAPS
CROWEDTICKZAP
ROSABOSTONMASS
ANTSARALOINKS
MESHGERETRYST
Mon 5/26/2003
SANGRAVEHEMEN
CLIOEDENALICE
ROCKFORTHRIGHT
AHEADNEEDSOS
MARRIAGERITE
TEARROAMED
AIRSTRIPSPROXY
IREPELTSPIE
LANDSGOALPOSTS
SNOOTSREAR
WILBURWRIGHT
OARLOONEERIE
GHOSTWRITENELL
REVUEETALTALE
EMENDSERFSTYX
Mon 8/19/2002
UKESELBAACTED
NOAHREAPLARVA
CARYGRANTBREED
ALLLASSWIRERS
PAYMENTMANY
ANTSAYONARA
STERNSHINAJAX
TAXIAMAZETAKE
ARIADOMETIRED
BATHMATSRIO
COPESEANCES
AGHASTFEARAVA
FLAREJIMCARREY
RILEYEDITCONS
OBEYSBOSSALTO
Sun 3/31/2002 EXTRA TIME
PEDALERBUGLEMATCH
IMITATEARROWCAROLER
CONTRABANDAGEUNAWARE
STEAKSNUBSCRIBSOP
ESCBASEJAVAASIA
HOOVERDAMAGEBLINI
SEAUNITOXEYELEAFED
INTONEDRUINSPETRI
ETHICSLOGOSHITMEN
SALLEHIGHMASSAGEDEM
TIESEASEHASHSAGE
ALTEXITRAMPAGESODAS
SECRETCOOKSFLOATS
SHARISTOLEGRANGER
SAFESTQUERYVAINEDS
CLOSEGUIDEPOSTAGE
ALOTCHATPIERMAD
ROTDRAYCRAIGDEPOT
EVASIONDROPANCHORAGE
SEGOVIARESETSANGRIA
RELAXJESSETWEETER

2 pre-Shortz crosswords by Lynn Lempel

Sun 3/15/1981 WORD PLAY
ELISHAPSATHOBBLED
SANTASOHIOMALLEOLI
AIRAPPARENTARTISTAS
UDONPTAHUTTONIPSO
DAZEOFWINEANDROSES
COMPLEXONIONINERT
AVIATEFLOESDORFSTE
LENTOBIOUSEALL
SITEFORSOREEYES
FLUFFEDBOREALMILER
TERRACEDRANEMMANUEL
CASESEAGLETDANGERS
HASTEMAKESWAIST
HEGIRAPREEMEND
ABSNOSHROASTSTARRY
SEULEUNITSFURNACE
CHAIRMANOFTHEBORED
HASTINTOTOLACROSA
VITIATESMAIDINJAPAN
EVERMOREAGOGBAKERY
SERKINSNOTEAGENDA
Sun 12/9/1979 LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING
FHASBESMUTSALOFT
ROISTERCARROTBELLOC
INROADSONEIDAMADAMA
NOMANSRODSOLESQUAT
GUARDINAPARTMENTUNTO
ERNEDENTIESTAATON
EREIHEPERROR
CHASMSASSADYALTA
PAARASTRCURLEUR
ERGNEEDLIPOYARDED
LEGATOACCEDEDOSSIFY
TELLERSEATPERUTEA
REINELKLOOTHERD
STOPSLEAVESHREDS
TROISVEXTHEM
SHULUMPVONPROVBSA
EASEROOMINDEBASEMENT
GRAFTNOOREDSTREMOR
EMBLEMFLIRTSFISSURE
RELATESALUTEPLEASES
DETERREGALAESEST