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217 crosswords with Notepads

Notepad entries come from Across Lite files and generally either duplicate notes in the print version or describe variations from the print version. I have done some minor hand editing when required for clarity.

This is sometimes useful for searching for puzzles that you know came with special instructions.

Shortz Era puzzles

When finished, this crossword grid will have 25 things that complete a set, in the order indicated by the clues.
Thursday, August 24, 2017 by Neil Patrick Harris and David Steinberg
CELEBRITY CROSSWORD
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors.
This collaboration is by the actor, comedian and emcee Neil Patrick Harris - the star of TV's "Doogie Howser, M.D." and "How I Met Your Mother" - working together with Stanford University student David Steinberg, who has been editing a weekly puzzle for the Orange County Register since he was 15. This is Mr. Steinberg's 66th crossword for The Times.
The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year.
More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
Monday, July 31, 2017 by David Steinberg
When this puzzle is finished, read the circled letters roughly clockwise, starting with the first letter of 68-Across, to spell the name of an appropriate landmark.
Sunday, July 30, 2017 — BY DESIGN by Isaac Mizrahi and David J. Kahn
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors. This collaboration is by the designer and TV host Isaac Mizrahi, together with David J. Kahn, a retired consulting actuary in New York City. This is David's 172nd crossword for The Times. More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 by Elayne Boosler and Patrick Merrell
CELEBRITY CROSSWORD
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors.

This collaboration is by the comedian Elayne Boosler, who was recently named by Rolling Stone magazine as one of the "50 Best Stand-Up Comics of All Time," working together with Patrick Merrell, a writer/illustrator in Vero Beach, Fla. This is Patrick's 86th puzzle for The Times.

The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year.

More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
Sunday, July 2, 2017 — THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD by Patrick Blindauer
In the print version of this puzzle, the black squares that form a continuous path from the left to right edges of the grid are instead shaded gray. When the puzzle is done, read the letters along this path to get another example of the theme.
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 by Lisa Loeb and Doug Peterson
CELEBRITY CROSSWORD
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors.
This collaboration is by the singer/songwriter Lisa Loeb, who had the #1 Billboard hit referenced in 41-Across - and altogether 11 studio albums to date - working with Doug Peterson, an employee at an accounting firm in Pasadena, Calif. This is Doug's 41st puzzle for The Times.
The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year.
More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
Friday, May 12, 2017 by Bill Clinton and Victor Fleming
CELEBRITY CROSSWORD
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors.
This collaboration is by former president Bill Clinton, an avid crossword doer, who sometimes works two or three puzzles in a day - in times that would be respectable at a crossword tournament - together with a longtime friend, a judge in Little Rock, Ark., Victor Fleming. This is Victor's 46th puzzle for The Times.
The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year.
More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
Sunday, April 23, 2017 — A CENTURY OF SONG by Olivia Mitra Framke
When this puzzle is done, draw a line connecting the 11 circled letters, starting and ending in square #28, so as to spell a phrase related to the puzzle's theme.
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 by Emanuel Ax and Brad Wilber
CELEBRITY CROSSWORD
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors.

This collaboration is by the Grammy-winning classical pianist Emanuel Ax, who also teaches at the Juilliard School, working with Brad Wilber, a reference librarian at Houghton College in upstate New York. This is Brad's 50th puzzle for The Times.

The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year.

More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
Monday, April 10, 2017 by Lonnie Burton
In the print version of this puzzle, the clue number 7 in both the grid and clues reads "007" instead. This does not affect solving.
Thursday, March 23, 2017 by Sandy Ganzell
In the print version of this puzzle, the columns consisting of 14-/42-Down, 16-/49-Down and 22-Down are not as wide as all the other columns.
Monday, March 20, 2017 by Neil deGrasse Tyson and Andrea Carla Michaels
CELEBRITY PUZZLE
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors.
This collaboration is by the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and his Harvard classmate Andrea Carla Michaels (with her 56th puzzle for The Times).
The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year.
More information about the making of today's puzzle appears in the Times's daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay).
The five rows of circled squares reveal an unusual feature of this puzzle.
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 by Jesse Eisenberg and Patrick Blindauer
To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted on Feb. 15, 1942, we are beginning today a series of puzzles co-constructed by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors. The first such collaboration, below, is by the actor Jesse Eisenberg "The Social Network," "Rio," "Now You See Me," "Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice") and Patrick Blindauer (with his 55th Times contribution). The celebrity collaborations will continue throughout the year — at least one a month, and sometimes more often. More information about the making of today's puzzle, along with news on future puzzles in the series, appears on the Times's crossword blog (nytimes.com/columns/wordplay).
Although this puzzle can be solved in Across Lite, the print version contains elements that the software cannot reproduce. We recommend using the PDF, or alternatively one of the other available electronic versions.
Thursday, November 17, 2016 by Timothy Polin and Joe Krozel
In the print version of this puzzle, the five squares in 50-Across each have a small number in them, as follows: 5 | 29 | 47 | 34 | 43
Thursday, September 29, 2016 by Jonathan M. Kaye
We recommend using the PDF, or alternatively one of the other available electronic versions, for solving this puzzle, as it contains elements that the software cannot reproduce.
Tuesday, August 23, 2016 by Joel Fagliano
In the print version of this puzzle, the circled squares are instead outlined in heavy black bars to form a spiral shape.
In the print version of this puzzle, five clues have a solid black bar in them. Here, these are represented by a string of number signs (####).
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 by Andrea Carla Michaels
The ninth annual Lollapuzzoola crossword tournament, directed by Brian Cimmet and Patrick Blindauer, will take place Saturday, Aug. 13, at All Souls Church in Manhattan. Information appears at bemoresmarter.com. This puzzle appeared in a prior tournament and had a 15-minute time limit.
Sunday, June 19, 2016 — TRAFFIC INTERSECTIONS by David Woolf
We recommend using the PDF, or alternatively one of the other available electronic versions, for solving this puzzle, as it contains elements that the software cannot reproduce.

Specifically, six squares which normally would be black instead each have their four edges colored, alternating between green and red. These colored squares occur at the intersections of 31A/11D, 34A/5D, 46A/26D, 62A/45D, 92A/67D and 98A/75D.
In the print version of this puzzle, the black square in the center of the puzzle contains an image of a compass rose.
Thursday, March 24, 2016 by David Liben-Nowell and Tom Pepper
In the print version of this puzzle, there is a special additional clue (under the heading "AROUND") whose answer begins in the circled square. The clue is "Self-descriptive statement about a 16-Across."
Sunday, March 20, 2016 — DOUBLE-CROSSED by Joel Fagliano
When this puzzle is completed, take the answer to each starred clue and cross out all the letters used twice. The leftover letters will spell an appropriate word, reading top to bottom.
Sunday, March 6, 2016 — IN CHARACTER by David J. Kahn
The answers to 23-, 31-, 45-, 62-, 69-, 90-, 103- and 115-Across are themselves clues to the names spelled by their circled letters.
The four long Across answers are affected by a literal interpretation of the shaded boxes.
Sunday, January 17, 2016 — TWISTING ONE'S WORDS by Jeff Chen
The print version of this puzzle contains small arrows between certain squares, which the software cannot reproduce. We recommend using the PDF.
Wednesday, November 4, 2015 by Ruth Bloomfield Margolin
The answers to this puzzle's four starred clues can each precede a hidden word in 16-, 27-, 43- and 59-Across.
Tuesday, November 3, 2015 by Brendan Emmett Quigley and Joel Fagliano
In the print and web version of this puzzle, four arithmetic symbols appear in the grid following certain clue numbers (2÷, 5-, 11+, 42x).
Tuesday, October 20, 2015 by Sam Buchbinder
The circled letters in this puzzle provide a hint to the starts of the answers to the four starred clues.
We asked some favorite Times crossword contributors, "What would you like to do in a daily Times crossword that has never been done before?" This week's puzzles, Monday to Saturday, are the result.
We asked some favorite Times crossword contributors, "What would you like to do in a daily Times crossword that has never been done before?" This week's puzzles, Monday to Saturday, are the result.

Note: When completed, the outer squares in this puzzle will contain each of the 26 letters of the alphabet exactly once.
We asked some favorite Times crossword contributors, "What would you like to do in a daily Times crossword that has never been done before?" This week's puzzles, Monday to Saturday, are the result.
We asked some favorite Times crossword contributors, "What would you like to do in a daily Times crossword that has never been done before?" This week's puzzles, Monday to Saturday, are the result.
Tuesday, October 13, 2015 by Patrick Berry
We asked some favorite Times crossword contributors, "What would you like to do in a daily Times crossword that has never been done before?" This week's puzzles, Monday to Saturday, are the result.
Monday, October 12, 2015 by Patrick Merrell
We asked some favorite Times crossword contributors, "What would you like to do in a daily Times crossword that has never been done before?" This week's puzzles, Monday to Saturday, are the result.
Sunday, September 27, 2015 — MARK MY WORDS by Tom McCoy
When this puzzle is completed, 12 squares will be filled with a certain keyboard symbol - which will have a different signification in the Across answers than it does in the Downs
Thursday, September 3, 2015 — THE GODS MUST BE CRAZY by Merl Reagle (1950-2015)
In honor of the late, beloved crossword constructor Merl Reagle, today we present a classic puzzle of his from the 1999 American Crossword Puzzle Tournament.
Seven Across answers in this puzzle have a highly unusual property for which we can't think of a single other common example. What is the property? (For answer, see 8/28 Notepad)
When this puzzle is done, four squares will remain empty. Which ones and why are for you to determine. (Across Lite solvers should put the letter B in these blank squares.)
The five Across answers with only years for clues are the five most recent members of a particular category.
This puzzle seemingly has more than one solution ... but only one is "correct."
Sunday, May 31, 2015 — MAKING PROJECTIONS by Tom McCoy
When this puzzle is completed, an apt phrase can be found by starting at the top central letter and reading clockwise.
Sunday, May 24, 2015 — A TALE OF MANY CITIES by Kevin G. Der
When this puzzle is completed, the circled letters will form a path (starting in the first circle of 93-Across) spelling out the puzzle's theme. Each long Down answer contains a hidden city, reading in order from top to bottom, not necessarily consecutively. The location of the city, and its number of letters, are indicated.
Sunday, March 8, 2015 — 3.1415926 ... by Tom McCoy
Although this puzzle can be solved in Across Lite, the print version contains elements that the software cannot reproduce. We recommend using the PDF, or alternatively one of the other available electronic versions.
Monday, February 16, 2015 by David J. Kahn
The last names of eight U.S. presidents are hidden in this puzzle's completed grid, reading across, back, up, down and diagonally, word-search style. Can you find them all?
When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading from top to bottom, will spell something that belongs in the center square.
After completing this puzzle, connect nine appropriate letters in order to discover an image associated with 44-Down.
With daylight saving time ending tonight, you have an extra hour to work on this extra-hard, oversize puzzle
Sunday, October 26, 2014 — WINNERS' CIRCLE by Caleb Emmons
When this puzzle is completed, the eight circled letters, starting in the upper left and proceeding roughly clockwise, will spell an appropriate word... or a different appropriate word.
Monday, October 20, 2014 — A SIGN OF THE TIMES by Patrick Blindauer
A Crossword Contest
All the puzzles this week, from Monday to Saturday, have been created by one person, Patrick Blindauer. Keep your solutions handy, because the Saturday puzzle conceals a meta-challenge involving the solution grids of all six. When you have the answer to the meta-challenge, send it to crossword@nytimes.com. Twenty correct solvers, chosen at random, whose entries are received by 6:00 p.m. E.T. Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014, will win one-year online subscriptions to the New York Times crossword. Only one entry per person, please. The answer and winners' names will appear on Friday, Oct. 31, at www.nytimes.com/wordplay.
Thursday, October 9, 2014 by Joel Fagliano
Although this puzzle can be solved in Across Lite, the print version contains elements that the software cannot reproduce. We recommend using the PDF, or alternatively one of the other available electronic versions.
The human body is said to have 10 three-letter body parts. All 10 of these are hidden inside Across answers in this puzzle. Can you find them all?
Thursday, September 11, 2014 — CHANGE OF HEART by Patrick Blindauer
This crossword was the most-discussed puzzle at Lollapuzzoola 7, a tournament held on August 9 in New York City. The event was directed by Brian Cimmet and Patrick Blindauer. Hint: The title is key to solving the puzzle. Time limit: 45 minutes.
Sunday, July 20, 2014 — MOVING PARTS by Eric Berlin
The answer to each starred clue must have two consecutive letters removed before it is written into the grid. These letters will move to a pair of circles elsewhere in the puzzle. (In all cases, new words will be formed.) The nine letter pairs, when properly arranged, will spell an appropriate answer at 72-Across.
Sunday, July 13, 2014 — WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT by Tom McCoy
The circled letters, when read clockwise, will reveal a quote from Gertrude Stein.
Wednesday, June 11, 2014 by Ian Livengood
When this puzzle is done, the seven circled letters, reading clockwise, will spell a phrase relating to the puzzle's theme.
Sunday, March 23, 2014 — BRIGHT IDEAS by Ian Livengood
When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading counterclockwise from the top, will spell a phrase relating to the puzzle's theme.
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 by David Steinberg
The answers to the 13 starred clues follow an unusual two-way progression from 1- to 73-Across. Can you figure out what it is?
Thursday, January 23, 2014 by Michael Hawkins
Although this puzzle can be solved in Across Lite, there are elements in the print version that cannot be duplicated electronically. We recommend using the PDF for the best solving experience.
Sunday, December 22, 2013 — GOOD ONE! by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is done, draw a line connecting the 21 circled letters from A to U in alphabetical order. The resulting shape will provide a clue to 6-, 8-, 14-, 53- and 70-Down.
Thursday, December 19, 2013 by George Barany and Michael Shteyman
Although this puzzle can be solved in Across Lite, there are elements in the print version that cannot be duplicated electronically. We recommend using the PDF for the best solving experience.
Thursday, December 12, 2013 by David Steinberg
After this puzzle was created, the constructor did something to 11 squares - as suggested by a two-word reading of 63-Across before alteration.
Sunday, October 13, 2013 — TAKEN TO TASK by Jeff Chen
In the print version of this puzzle, the square after 43-Across is a black circle rather than a black square.
Sunday, September 22, 2013 — LETTERBOXES by Mike Selinker
CONTEST CROSSWORD

In this special prize crossword, the completed solution conceals a familiar three-word phrase related to the puzzle's theme. 70-Across provides a hint on how to find it. The crossword itself can be solved in all the usual online formats. However, to solve the bonus contest element, you will need to see some heavy outlines in the grid, which cannot be reproduced electronically. Thus, if you plan to enter the contest, please print out the PDF version of the puzzle.
     When you have the answer, e-mail it to crossword@nytimes.com. Twenty-five correct solvers, chosen at random, whose entries are received by 6 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, Sept. 24, will receive copies of The New York Times Crossword Puzzles 2014 Day-to-Day Calendar, courtesy of Andrews McMeel. Only one entry per person, please. The answer and explanation will appear next week. The winners' names will be announced on Friday, Sept. 27, on the Times's daily crossword blog at nytimes.com/wordplay.
Thursday, August 29, 2013 by Timothy Polin
A certain three-letter word, appropriate to this puzzle's theme, goes in the unnumbered center square.
Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Todd Gross and David Steinberg
There is a punctuation mark somewhere in the theme answer that cannot be replicated in some digital formats. We recommend using the first letter of that punctuation mark.
Sunday, June 16, 2013 — QUESTION BOX by Mel Rosen
When this puzzle is done, take the answers to the 10 starred clues and arrange them across and down in crossword fashion in the central 5x5 box. The resulting five-letter word spelled out diagonally by the circles will answer the question asked at 23-, 34-, 91- and 107-Across.
Sunday, June 9, 2013 — FAST ONE by Elizabeth C. Gorski
Complete the puzzle. Then connect the circled letters alphabetically from A to S to get an image related to the puzzle's theme.
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 by Bruce Venzke
The print version of this puzzle contains the following additional clue after the Across and Down clues: 

DIAGONAL 
1 Annual message
Some versions of this puzzle use circles to denote larger 2x2 squares. NYT recommends that you print out the PDF and solve on paper.
The answer to each italicized clue is a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase. A certain four-letter word (spelled out clockwise by the circled squares) can follow the first half and precede the second half of each of these answers, in each case to complete another compound word or familiar two-word phrase.
This puzzle features elements that cannot be duplicated in electronic formats. We strongly suggest using the PDF file instead.
Four answers in this puzzle are incomplete. The missing part can be found in four other places in the grid.
Sunday, November 25, 2012 — A LITTLE EXTRA by Jeff Chen
Fourteen symmetrically placed answers in this puzzle are each missing a part ... which can be found elsewhere in the grid.
Sunday, October 21, 2012 — BYPASSING SECURITY by Caleb Rasmussen
This puzzle's grid represents a sealed vault and its well-guarded surroundings. After completing the crossword, start in the upper-left corner and find a safe path to an important item. Then determine where to use this item to access the vault and its contents.

To enter the contest, identify the following 10 things: a) the name of the "important item," b) where to use it, c) seven hazards to avoid, and d) the contents of the vault. Each of these things is named by a single word.

When you have found the 10 words, send them in an e-mail to: crossword@nytimes.com. Fifty correct solvers, chosen at random, whose entries are received by 6 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, Oct. 23, will receive copies of The New York Times Sunday Crossword Puzzles 2013 Weekly Planner Calendar (Andrews McMeel). Only one entry per person, please. The answer grid will appear next week. The winners' names will appear in the issue of Nov. 4.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 by Bill Thompson
The seven circled letters reading from top to bottom describe an event occurring at four locations in this puzzle.
Although this puzzle can be solved in Across Lite, the print version includes elements that cannot be duplicated in the software. We recommend downloading and printing out the PDF version.
This puzzle has features not possible to duplicate in Across Lite. We highly recommend solving the PDF version.
Wednesday, August 8, 2012 by Peter A. Collins
When this puzzle is done, the answers to the six starred clues will form a word ladder, starting with 4-Across, whose record of 33-/42-Across was broken by 68-Across.
Thursday, June 21, 2012 by Caleb Emmons
Parts of six answers have been entered in the grid for you.
Monday, June 18, 2012 by Peter A. Collins
When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading from left to right and top to bottom, will reveal who wrote the seven songs in the theme.
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 by Daniel A. Finan
The circles in this puzzle are contained in words that form a sequence. Connect these circles, in the order of the sequence, to form an appropriate image.
Tuesday, April 17, 2012 by Milo Beckman
The circled letters in this puzzle, when read in the correct order, spell the name of a shape. The four unclued answers are common three-word phrases usually accompanied by this shape.
Sunday, April 15, 2012 — GRID IRON by Kevin G. Der
When this puzzle is finished, 12 special squares, along with the shaded squares, will create an image of 56-Down. The 12 squares corresponding to the "reflection" of the special squares, when read clockwise from top left, will spell an alternative name for 56-Down.
Thursday, April 5, 2012 by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this crossword is done, the puzzle's theme will help you fill the interior squares.
This puzzle has two bonus answers in appropriate places. Can you find them?
Wednesday, February 1, 2012 by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is completed, the 10 circled letters, read from top to bottom, will spell a name associated with 39-Across.
Parts of 15 answers in this puzzle are missing, in a manner for you to discover.
Sunday, November 20, 2011 — FIGURE IT OUT by Trip Payne
In some squares of this crossword (as indicated by slashes), the Across and Down answers do not actually cross. Write both parts in the squares. Then use the central Across answer to interpret them properly to spell an appropriate final word.
Monday, October 17, 2011 by Patrick Berry
"CROSS" WORDS CONTEST
All the puzzles this week, from Monday to Saturday, have been created by one person, Patrick Berry. Have your solutions handy, because the Saturday puzzle conceals a meta-challenge involving the solution grids of all six. When you have the answer to the meta-challenge, mail it to: crossword@nytimes.com. Twenty-five correct solvers, chosen at random, whose entries are received by 6:00 p.m. E.T. Sunday, Oct. 23, will receive copies of "Will Shortz Picks His Favorite Puzzles: 101 of the Top Crosswords From The New York Times." Only one entry per person, please. The answer and winners' names will appear on Friday, Oct. 28, at http://www.nytimes.com/wordplay.
Sunday, October 2, 2011 — MASQUERADE by Eric Berlin
Ten famous people are attending a costume party in this crossword. After the grid is filled, change the two shaded letters in each theme answer to "unmask" a celebrity.
Two hints for 17- and 57-Across and 11- and 26-Down appear somewhere in this puzzle.
Sunday, August 21, 2011 — UNDERWATER SEARCH by Alan Arbesfeld
When this puzzle is done, look for a name (hinted at by 37-Down) hidden 17 times in the grid, each reading forward, backward, down, up or diagonally, word search-style.
This crossword was the playoff puzzle at Lollapuzzoola 4, a tournament held in New York City on Aug. 6, conducted by Brian Cimmet and Patrick Blindauer. The champion, Jeffrey Harris, completed it in less than 9 minutes.
Wednesday, July 20, 2011 by Peter A. Collins
When this puzzle is done, you will find that the ends of the answers to the five starred clues, when in the 15-/67-Across, comprise a 1-/71-Across.
Sunday, July 3, 2011 — MY TREAT by Pete Muller
When this puzzle is done, the circles will contain five different letters of the alphabet. Connect each set of circles containing the same letter, without crossing your line, to make a simple closed shape. The resulting five closed shapes together will form a picture of a 117-Across. The five letters can be arranged to name a good place to get a 117-Across.
Wednesday, June 8, 2011 by Peter A. Collins
When this puzzle is done, connect the four V's with a square, the three K's with an upside-down L, and each K diagonally to the nearest V. Then draw a circle around the only X.
Sunday, May 29, 2011 — YOU'LL GET THROUGH THIS by Jeremy Newton and Tony Orbach
The grid represents a maze. Enter the room at the upper left and exit at the lower right, following a path that will become apparent as you solve the crossword. When the puzzle is done, read the circled letters in the order in which the rooms are visited to spell a quote by 153-Across.
Sunday, May 22, 2011 — HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY! by Bob Klahn
The New York Public Library turns 100 on May 23.
Friday, May 13, 2011 by Joe Krozel
Every length of answer from 3 to 15 letters - except one - appears in this puzzle. Some people might have a 1-Across about that.
When this puzzle is done, the 11 circled letters can be connected by a curved line to spell a two-word phrase appropriate to this puzzle's theme.
Thursday, May 5, 2011 by Joel Fagliano
Some of the black squares in this puzzle's grid provide a hint to the four longest Down answers.
Four answers in this puzzle are missing the same eight-letter clue - a single word that can be spelled from the eight circled letters. When the puzzle is done, connect the circled letters in order with a line, and you will get an outline of the object the word names.
Sunday, January 2, 2011 — WORKS IN TRANSLATION by David Levinson Wilk
In the regular print version of this puzzle, the clues for 27-, 38- and 47-Across include words in foreign alphabets which cannot be displayed in Across Lite. In these cases, English-letter transliterations have been substituted.
Sunday, December 5, 2010 — ON A ROLL by Ben Pall
This puzzle may be solved in Across Lite or the Java applet as a normal crossword. However, since it contains bonus elements that cannot be rendered electronically, we encourage solvers to print out the PDF that is also being offered.
Wednesday, November 24, 2010 by Allan E. Parrish
When this puzzle is done, read the eight circled letters clockwise, starting with square #24, to identify this puzzle's theme.
Friday, November 5, 2010 by Mike Nothnagel
SECRET PHRASE CONTEST
When this puzzle has been completed, put nine holes over the grid and arrange the letters shown to form an appropriate two-word phrase (4,5). Where these holes are is for you to discover. When you have the answer, send it by e-mail to crossword@nytimes.com. Twenty-five correct solvers chosen at random, whose entries are received by midnight E.S.T. Sunday, Nov. 7, will receive copies of "The New York Times Little Black and White Book of Holiday Crosswords." Only one entry per person, please. The answer and winners' names will appear on Friday, Nov. 12, at www.nytimes.com/wordplay.
Sunday, October 31, 2010 — FANGS FOR THE MEMORY by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is completed, connect the circled letters in alphabetical order from A to R to show the outline of an 84-Across.
Tuesday, October 12, 2010 by José Chardiet
The answers to the 12 starred clues have something in common. What is it?
Sunday, September 26, 2010 — LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION by Pamela Amick Klawitter
Each set of circled letters is described by an answer elsewhere in the grid.
When this puzzle is completed, the circled letters, starting at 21-Across and reading clockwise, will reveal the first part of 17-Across.
Monday, September 13, 2010 by Aimee Lucido, Brown University '13
BROWN CROSSWORD WEEK
Every crossword this week, from Monday to Saturday, has been created by a member of the Puzzling Association of Brown University. Founded in 2008, the student club has about 30 members, who meet weekly during the school year to solve and discuss puzzles. Each spring it organizes a campuswide crossword tournament. Other schools with crossword clubs include Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Texas Christian. Brown’s club, though, has the most members with published puzzles.
This crossword is unusual in a certain way. Can you identify how?
Thursday, July 22, 2010 by Jeremy Horwitz
These two clues are for the center square:

Across: Shortest title of any #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 [Britney Spears, 2009]

Down: Length of the eight runners-up to the Across answer, all of which are answers to starred clues in this puzzle
Wednesday, June 23, 2010 by Alex Boisvert
In the print version of today's puzzle, some of the horizontal rules of the grid are not solid all the way across. They appear broken, for reasons relating to the puzzle's theme. Specifically, the horizontal rules under the following squares are not solid:
Row #3 -- under squares 5-7
Row #5 -- under squares 9-13
Row #8 -- under squares 6-10
Sunday, May 9, 2010 — MS. CONCEPTIONS by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is done, a bonus message will appear in the circled boxes reading from top to bottom.
Sunday, April 25, 2010 — MONUMENTAL ACHIEVEMENT by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is done, the seven circled letters can be arranged to spell a common word, which is missing from seven of the clues, as indicated by [ ]. Connect the seven letters in order with a line and you will get an outline of the object that the word names.
Sunday, April 4, 2010 — AFTER WORD by Bob Klahn
Bonus question: What word can follow each half of the answer to each starred clue?
Thursday, March 18, 2010 by Daniel A. Finan
When this puzzle is done, the answers will include a familiar series of 38-Across (minus the middle square). Connect the squares of this series in order with a line, starting with the circled square. The resulting image will be a pair of 38-Across (WITH the middle square). In addition, the clues all share a feature that provides an additional hint to the puzzle's theme.
When this puzzle is finished, the six circled letters can be arranged to spell an answer to the catchphrase reading diagonally from upper left to lower right.
Wednesday, February 17, 2010 by Elizabeth A. Long
The circled letters, starting in square #27 and reading clockwise, will spell a familiar phrase suggested by 20-, 35- and 52-Across.
The answers to the combined Across clues are anagrams of each other. The order in which the answers in each pair are to be entered in the grid is for you to discover.
Monday, January 25, 2010 by Holden Baker
The print version of this puzzle's grid has two arrows: one pointing from 15A to 17A, and one pointing from 69A to 70A.
Sunday, January 24, 2010 — ABRIDGED EDITION by David Kwong and Kevan Choset
In the print version of this puzzle's grid, there are dotted vertical lines between the 11th and 12th columns, and between the 18th and 19th columns.
Sunday, December 13, 2009 — SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION by Mike Shenk
The words in the shaded spaces will spell a quotation from Linus Pauling.
Sunday, November 15, 2009 — MAN OF MANY WORDS by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle has been completed, connect the circled letters in order from A to N to get an appropriate image.
Thursday, November 5, 2009 by Patrick Blindauer
When this puzzle is completed, one letter of the alphabet will appear 22 times. Shade in its square everywhere it appears. The result will be an image suggested by 36-Across.
When the puzzle is done, the circled letters will spell, from top to bottom, the name of the town where all the people in this puzzle's theme once lived.
Monday, September 14, 2009 by Bernice Gordon
HALF-CENTURY PUZZLEMAKERS' WEEK
All the daily crosswords this week, Monday through Saturday, are by puzzlemakers who have been contributing to The Times for more than 50 years. Bernice Gordon, 95, of Philadelphia, had her first Sunday crossword published on January 23, 1955. Her first weekday puzzle appeared three years earlier. She is the oldest known puzzlemaker in the newspaper's history.
Saturday, September 5, 2009 by Mike Nothnagel
This crossword was the playoff puzzle at Lollapuzzoola, a crossword tournament directed by Brian Cimmet and Ryan Hecht, held in Jackson Heights, Queens, on August 22. The winner, Dan Feyer, of New York City, finished it perfectly in 7 minutes 10 seconds.
Sunday, July 12, 2009 — LINKS TO THE PAST by Alan Arbesfeld
When this puzzle is done, interpret the answers to the seven starred clues literally, in order from top to bottom.
When completed, this puzzle grid will contain an unusual feature that appears nine times. Can you find it?
Thursday, June 11, 2009 by Alex Boisvert
After finishing this puzzle, color the circled squares blue, and color all the Across answers containing an "R" red, to reveal an image related to the puzzle's theme.
Sunday, May 31, 2009 — ODD ONE OUT by Kelsey Blakley
Every letter in the answer to each asterisked clue appears an even number of times in that answer ... except one. Altogether, these eight unpaired letters can be arranged to spell the answer to 68- and 70-Across.
Sunday, May 24, 2009 — PERPETUAL MOTION by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is done, start at the end of 57-Across; then, beginning counterclockwise, connect the circles in one continuous line to identify a figure invented by 29-Down. The answers to the five asterisked clues will provide a hint to the figure.
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 by Daniel A. Finan
When this puzzle is done, the nine circles will contain the letters A through I. Connect them with a line, in alphabetical order, and you will form an illustration of the puzzle’s theme.
Monday, March 16, 2009 by Lynn Lempel
The answers to the eight starred clues all have something in common, each in a different way.
Sunday, March 1, 2009 — GOOD AND BAD by Robert W. Harris
For the answer to each starred clue, including the first letter is good; dropping it is bad.
Sunday, January 18, 2009 — HIGH FIVE by Randolph Ross
The answers to the 9 starred clues all contain 5 letters in common, reading left to right, not necessarily consecutively.
Sunday, November 23, 2008 — PICTURE THIS by David J. Kahn
When this puzzle is done, read the circled letters in the top half of the puzzle clockwise starting with the last letter of 66-Across; and read the circled letters in the bottom half of the puzzle clockwise starting with the second letter of 77-Across.
Tuesday, November 11, 2008 by Nancy Salomon and Larry Shearer
DIAGONAL
1  Disappearing
12 Proceeding with little effort
TEEN PUZZLEMAKER WEEK
All the daily crosswords this week, Monday through Saturday, have been contributed by puzzlemakers under the age of 20. Today's crossword is by Caleb Madison, 15, of New York City. He is a sophomore at Bard High School in Manhattan. This is his fourth puzzle for The Times.

When this puzzle is done, connect the circled letters in alphabetical order, and then back to the start, to reveal something seen on the 32-Down 4-Down.
TEEN PUZZLEMAKER WEEK
All the daily crosswords this week, Monday through Saturday, have been contributed by puzzlemakers under the age of 20. Today’s crossword is by Oliver Hill, 18, of Pleasantville, N.Y. He is a first-year student at Yale University. This is his fifth puzzle for The Times.
Sunday, August 24, 2008 — COME FLY WITH ME by Kevin G. Der
The print version of this crossword has a dotted line around the outside of the grid.
Thursday, August 14, 2008 by Damon J. Gulczynski
When this puzzle is done, unscramble the five circled letters to find out how the circles could have been left with the puzzle's solution still being correct.
Wednesday, July 30, 2008 by Elizabeth A. Long
When this puzzle is finished, the 11 circled letters in reading order will spell the subject of the quote starting at 20-Across.
The eight two-letter answers in this puzzle are all state postal abbreviations, representing (in some order) the Beaver State, Beehive State, Big Sky Country, Heart of Dixie, Pine Tree State, Show Me State, Sunflower State and Volunteer State.
Sunday, May 25, 2008 — SPY GLASS by Elizabeth C. Gorski
When this puzzle is done, the seven circles will contain the letters from A to G. Starting with A, connect them alphabetically with one continuous line, and you'll get an image of a 39-Across.
17- and 64-Across and 11- and 34-Down each conceals an article of clothing.
Sunday, April 20, 2008 — SPACED OUT by John Farmer
When the puzzle is done, the letters in the following squares spell a bonus phrase: 7A - 3rd letter, 31A - 5th, 65A - 4th, 104A - 6th, 136A - 3rd, 151A - 1st, 149A - 4th, 133A - 4th, 100A - 1st, 62A - 1st, 29A - 6th
The circled letters in the answers to the seven starred clues, reading left to right or top to bottom, spell words that can complete familiar phrases that start with "break."
Sunday, December 9, 2007 — SECRET SANTA’S HELPERS by Patrick Blindauer
Bonus puzzle: When this crossword has been completed, try to find the word ELF hidden in the grid 20 times, word search-style -- horizontally, vertically and diagonally in any direction.
Tuesday, December 4, 2007 by Alison Donald
The answers at 17- and 51-Across and 11- and 24-Down can all be defined by the same missing three-letter word. What is it?
DIAGONAL
What you might do eventually to make up for lost time
The clues in the print version of this puzzle appear in a single list, combining Across and Down. Where two answers share a number, they also share a clue.
Wednesday, September 26, 2007 by Lee Glickstein and Craig Kasper
The answers to the 13 starred clues have something in common.
The clues in the print version of this puzzle appear in a single list, combining Across and Down. Where two answers share a number, the unclued Down answer is a homophone of the corresponding Across answer.
While some Across clues in this puzzle are blank, every answer is in fact clued.
Wednesday, July 4, 2007 by Patrick Blindauer
When this puzzle has been completed, shade in the letters of 35-Across everywhere they appear in the grid, revealing three letters and three lines.
Sunday, July 1, 2007 — DIAMOND JUBILEE by Nancy Salomon and Bill Zais
Diamond (starting at third square of 109-Across)
NE "Now I've seen everything!", NW Swipes a base, SW Show, SE Didn't go out
Wednesday, January 31, 2007 by Brendan Emmett Quigley
DIAGONAL
1 Face imaginary enemies
7 1972 Bill Withers #1 hit
37 Bettor's buy
Sunday, December 31, 2006 — FILM PARADE by Elizabeth C. Gorski
Note: When this puzzle has been completed, the following answers will form a progression: 76A, 10D, 112A, 22A, 51A, 15D, 37A, 86D, 97A, 62D and 131A.
Sunday, February 5, 2006 — CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE by Eric Berlin
The eight theme answers in this puzzle are clues to common words. When the grid has been filled, guess these missing words, whose letters correspond to the numbers shown. Every number from 1 to 25 is used exactly twice. When you’re done, arrange the letters in order from 1 to 25 to reveal a bit of advice about getting ahead.
Sunday, January 22, 2006 — THE SOUND OF MUSIC by George Barany and Michael Shteyman
When this puzzle is completed, the circled letters, read in order from left to right (column by column), will reveal the name of a Mystery Person.
Thursday, December 15, 2005 by Patrick Merrell
Can you figure out what’s unusual about this crossword? If not, when you’re done, read the first letters of the clues in reverse order.
Thursday, November 10, 2005 by Lee Glickstein and Craig Kasper
This puzzle was never published in Across Lite format on the NYT website and it's available here for the first time. Note that for 1 Across, 1 Down, 34 Down, and 69 Across, the original split clues have been combined.

Click here for a PDF showing how the puzzle appeared in print, here for the answers as published, and here for a new Across Lite version.
As a demonstration of speed puzzle construction at the 28th American Crossword Puzzle Tournament, on March 11 in Stamford, Conn., Mike Shenk took a theme proposed by the audience and created this puzzle, start to finish, without computer-assisted fill, in 60 minutes. Later, in a race to solve it, Trip Payne, of Boca Raton, Fla., finished first, in 3 minutes. About two-thirds of the audience completed the puzzle correctly within the 15-minute time limit.
Sunday, March 13, 2005 — LABORATORY MAZE by Patrick Merrell
When this puzzle is completed, solve the maze in the grid, traveling through the openings in the squares, beginning at 69-Across, ending at 103-Down...and passing over the word spelled at 71-Across 18 times. As you proceed, the consecutive letters of 71-Across will always be in their correct order, in straight lines reading forward, backward, up or down.
The three circled letters will spell a word that is missing from 14 answers in this puzzle.
Sunday, December 5, 2004 — FROM THE PRESIDENTIAL RECORD BOOKS by David J. Kahn
Former President Bill Clinton, whose presidential library opened in Little Rock on Nov. 18, is a regular crossword solver. He pretested this puzzle for us, finishing it in "less than an hour." (How does your time compare?)
Wednesday, May 12, 2004 by Allan E. Parrish
Arrange the four circled letters in the grid to get a word that defines the four unclued answers.
Monday, March 15, 2004 by Patrick Merrell
The unkeyed square to the right of #36 has this "Down" clue: John Philip Sousa offering. And the unkeyed square numbered 42 has this "Down" clue: "Little Women" family name.
Note: The circled letters will show a "change in the weather."
Wednesday, August 27, 2003 by Manny Nosowsky
18- & 22-Across and 53- & 57-Across have a hidden connection to 36-Across.
Thursday, August 21, 2003 by Patrick Merrell
Twelve answers in this puzzle are to be entered in an unusual way, for you to discover.
Thursday, June 26, 2003 by Patrick Berry
Note: A certain letter of the alphabet appears in this puzzle exactly 21 times. When you have finished solving, find and connect these letters to get an appropriate design.
Tuesday, June 17, 2003 by Susan Harrington Smith
Sixteen answers in this puzzle have something unusual in common. What is it?
Thursday, May 8, 2003 by Elizabeth C. Gorski
The circled diagonal letters will spell a hint to 8 other answers in the grid.
Thursday, December 26, 2002 by Cathy Millhauser
The seven circled letters, reading in order from top to bottom, will spell the title of this puzzle.
The print version of this puzzle has white spaces following 23-Across, between 37- and 39-Across, and preceding 49-Across.
Friday, August 30, 2002 by Patrick Merrell
Visual hints to the answers to the asterisked clues (*) can be found in the grid.
Sunday, April 14, 2002 — POSITIONAL PLAY by David J. Kahn
This puzzle has a complete set of related key words - occupying appropriate places in the grid - to be discovered.
Note: In a letter bank, the letters of one word are used (and repeated as necessary) to spell a longer word or phrase. For example, IMPS is a letter bank of MISSISSIPPI.
Thursday, November 29, 2001 by Patrick Merrell
Note: Across Lite will consider a correct solution to 36-Across to be XXX.
Despite appearances, every square in this themed puzzle appears in two answers, across and down.
Sunday, December 24, 2000 — CHRISTMAS PLAY by Bill Zais
The tree shape when read counterclockwise gives the name of a Holiday tune.
Sunday, September 3, 2000 — WHO WANTS TO BE A QUIZ SHOW CONTESTANT? by David J. Kahn
Each answer at 26-, 39-, 63-, 84- and 101-Across is a quiz question for which there is one correct response among the four choices in the clue. The circled letter in the answer is the correct response.
Sunday, May 14, 2000 — TAKING TURNS by Bill Zais and Nancy Salomon
In the print version, the squares at 5, 10, 45, 60, 90, 108, 139 and 140 were not numbered. There were no clues at 5-Down, 10-Down, 45-Across, 60-Down, 90-Across, 108-Down, 139-Across or 140-Across. Adjustments to accommodate Across Lite have resulted in the online puzzle having different clue numbers than the print version.
Thursday, April 27, 2000 by Greg Staples
The 10 unclued answers in this puzzle (from 20-Across to 57-Across) comprise a word ladder, in which one letter is changed between each consecutive step.
Sunday, February 13, 2000 — GROOVY KIND OF LOVE by Bill Zais
HEART (Clockwise): 1955 Four Aces hit (and theme of this puzzle)
Wednesday, December 1, 1999 by Bill Zais and Nancy Salomon
DIAGONAL
1 Pirate booty
68 More pirate booty
The answers at 20-, 32-, 43- and 58-Across form a progressive word ladder of five-letter words, where each word is one letter different from the one before it.
Tuesday, May 4, 1999 by Gayle Dean
A particular thing -- a common part of almost all crosswords -- is wholly missing today. What is it?
Sunday, February 7, 1999 — HIDDEN ZOO by Nancy Nicholson Joline
The names of 12 common animals are concealed inside some of the answers in the completed grid, reading across and down. Can you find them all?
Sunday, March 29, 1998 — TWO BY THIRTEEN by Robert H. Wolfe
Circled entries contain 2 letters
Sunday, February 1, 1998 — AT THE STAMP CELEBRATION by Merl Reagle
Today the U.S. Postal Service unveils a 32-cent stamp commemorating the American invention of the crossword puzzle in 1913. (The stamp goes on sale February 3.) If puzzlers were in charge of the celebration, this might be the schedule of events...
Sunday, October 15, 1995 — RETRONYMS by Mel Rosen
More descriptive names to differentiate old things from their new form
Sunday, May 21, 1995 — CELEBRITY TYPES by Dean Niles
In E-mail messages, faces are sometimes created by combinations of letters, numbers and punctuation marks, as :-( for a frowning face. Tilt your head 90 degrees to the left to view
Sunday, March 12, 1995 — TIMES PAST by Charles M. Deber
March 14, 1995 marked the 50,000 issue of the New York Times
Sunday, January 1, 1995 — A NEW BEGINNING by Henry Hook
All the boxes in 74-Across have a diagonal line bisecting them allowing the entry of two letters. No answer is included...you'll know when you get it
Wednesday, September 28, 1994 by Robert Zimmerman
The unclued answers have something in common
Sunday, July 10, 1994 — STEPQUOTE by Alvin Chase
This puzzle is dedicated to the memory of Eugene T. Maleska, who created the first Stepquote
Sunday, April 3, 1994 — MYSTERY THEME by Ernie Furtado
The 10 unclued answer in this puzzle are familiar phrases presented literally. When the puzzle is completed, the 12 circled letter - reading in order from top to bottom - will spell an appropriate phrase
Wednesday, January 26, 1994 by Kenneth Haxton
Diagonal clue: Opening of 5/4/93

Pre-Shortz puzzles

Sunday, April 4, 1993 — TITLE SEARCH by Tap Osborn
In the original clues, the letters in 4-Down and 98-Down are not in a horizontal line; rather, they are randomly both above and below their normal positions.
Sunday, May 31, 1992 — CRYPTOCROSSWORD by Eugene T. Maleska
Directions:

This crossword puzzle above has no tricks but is designed as a vocabulary builder. Some of the boxes are divided in half and contain a letter inside the bottom half. Disregard these letters as you go along. The letter in the top half is part of the crossword answer.

After finishing the crossword, turn to the cryptogram below. The letters are the same as the ones in the lower halves of the boxes above. But you have placed another letter in each upper half. That letter helps to solve the cryptogram. For example, Q/X: in the cryptogram all X's would become Q's.

TECS EAYTLEZSH JRHT CRZS YOWT LKSR: "LAY BETS WHYE YOS ORKK EJ JRCS, JEB LSYS'T TRZS!"

Some people may wish to solve the cryptogram with the aid of the crossword. Others may choose to solve the crossword and the cryptogram without reference to each other.
Sunday, July 2, 1989 — FRACTURED POLYSYLLABLES by Ernst Theimer
FURTHER CLUES
25 A = 37 A
52 A = 116 A
65 A = 118 A
27 A = 40 D
48 D = 93 D
73 D = 91 A
Saturday, July 5, 1986 by Kenneth Haxton
An additional clue at the end of the list: 64 Diagonal "Court star"
Saturday, July 13, 1985 by Ernst Theimer
DIAGONALS
1. How this runs
11. How this runs
Tuesday, January 15, 1985 by John M. Samson
This was Martin Luther King Day in 1985
Saturday, January 5, 1985 by Kenneth Haxton
DIAGONAL
1. American Author
Saturday, December 22, 1984 by Kenneth Haxton
DIAGONAL: 1 American character actor
Sunday, November 25, 1984 — SHAKESPEAREAN OLYMPICS by Bert Rosenfield
Football, baseball, the Bible and in this case the Olympics are the realms into which this puzzle constructor has taken the oft-quoted words of Shakespeare.
Thursday, May 1, 1980 by I. Judah Koolyk
19 Across: madrileños
Sunday, April 16, 1978 — CIRCLES IN THE SQUARE by Jeanette K. Brill
The circled squares from left to right, starting at the top, contain a quotation.