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New York Times, Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Author:
Andrea Carla Michaels
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
656/12/20003/25/201937
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74592200
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.63217
Andrea Carla Michaels

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 78, Blocks: 39 Missing: {FJQVX} Grid has repeated answers This is puzzle # 54 for Ms. Michaels. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Notepad: The ninth annual Lollapuzzoola crossword tournament, directed by Brian Cimmet and Patrick Blindauer, will take place Saturday, Aug. 13, at All Souls Church in Manhattan. Information appears at bemoresmarter.com. This puzzle appeared in a prior tournament and had a 15-minute time limit.
Andrea Carla Michaels notes:
Made this years ago when Brian Cimmet and Patrick Blindauer were nice enough to ask me to create something for Lollapuzzoola. ... read more

Made this years ago when Brian Cimmet and Patrick Blindauer were nice enough to ask me to create something for Lollapuzzoola. Brainstormed ideas wanting to do something New York-centric (thus the NEW YORK NEW YORK running thru the middle and ELLIS Island and CHINATOWN running down) (And a little YOUBETCHA as a shout out to the Minnesotans out there!)

My original concept for this puzzle is quite different from what appears here. To be honest, I fought both Patrick and Will on this, but lost in the end. (Of course. they are probably right.) But I wanted to have double phrases (ZOOM ZOOM, HEAR YE HEAR YE, SING SING, etc.) separated by a black square but the FIRST word would be defined as is... and the second one would be "With such and such across (New concept)" So, for example, 71A: "To chant melodically" (SING) / 72A: "With 71A a prison in upstate NY" (SINGSING). This way, only the second half would have "With such and such ..." in the clue...so it would be two different ideas... a singular one and when doubled, a new concept.

But Patrick thought it would be better if they were defined as one concept in two different ways. In the end, I had to defer to his genius and instincts. (Will agreed and was willing to publish it in the NYT to generously cross promote the tournament this upcoming weekend, so I'm thrilled it's seeing the light of day, years later, in any form!)

Patrick and Will should share in the credit. (AUTHOR AUTHOR AUTHOR?) I urge everyone to go and have a blast at Lollapuzzoola, even though I can't make it this year. You can find me in San Francisco having a major bout of FOMO.

Jeff Chen notes:
I love hanging out with crossworld people, so I'm sad that I haven't ever been able to make Lollapuzzoola. Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) ... read more

I love hanging out with crossworld people, so I'm sad that I haven't ever been able to make Lollapuzzoola. Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) indeed! What with the long trip out from the West Coast to NYC, and two little kids sapping my strength — er, delighting me — I'll miss this year too. Ah well.

Although I've seen a lot of word duplication puzzles before, this one had an interesting feel to it. I actually had the same internal debate Andrea did — I can see both sides of her struggle. On one hand, it's pretty cool to have one word defined as normal, and the other one cross-referenced. On the other hand, it's really fun to see doubled-word phrases … having two separate definitions! AUTHOR AUTHOR clued as both the Al Pacino film and the P.G. Wodehouse book is entertaining.

I also really liked how the last themer broke the pattern. As much as I like consistency, this is a potentially repetitive-feeling theme, so it's cool to get not just SING SING the prison, but SING SING SING, the classic big band tune. For solvers lulled into a false sense of complacency … ba-BAM!

I hadn't noticed all the NEW YORK NEW YORK-centered fill, so it was nice to get an explanation of why there was a good amount of crossword glue holding everything together: INRI, ERR ON, SKED, MUMBO (can only be clued one way), IT NO, etc. Makes more sense now that i see the trade-offs.

Finally, there are a few elements that make this puzzle more whimsical than what would usually be seen in the NYT — I just loved that [What generals keep up their sleevies?] for ARMIES. So playful.

Dang it, my FOMO is even worse now!

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© 2016, The New York TimesNo. 0809 ( 24,381 )
Across
1
Computers that are un-PC : MACS
5
With 9-Across, an auto ad slogan : ZOOM
9
With 5-Across, quickly : ZOOM
13
Workplace protection agcy. : OSHA
14
"My Heart Can't Take ___ More" (1963 Supremes song) : ITNO
15
Two cents, so to speak : INPUT
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"Pay me later" marker : CHIT
18
Sly look : LEER
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Salon jobs, for short : PERMS
20
Casino game that looks like a thou in reverse : KENO
21
Grouches : CRANKS
23
Lawyer's org. : ABA
24
With 26-Across, 1982 Al Pacino film : AUTHOR
26
With 24-Across, 1962 P. G. Wodehouse book : AUTHOR
28
Bonkers : BATTY
30
Horsefeathers : TRIPE
32
Spanish treasure : ORO
33
Ottoman bigwigs : PASHAS
36
Colors, as Easter eggs : DYES
40
With 42-Across, Frank Sinatra signature song : NEWYORK
42
With 40-Across, where Broadway is : NEWYORK
44
Hamlet or Ophelia : DANE
45
Scanty, in London : MEAGRE
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Prefix with lateral : UNI
48
They turn litmus paper red : ACIDS
50
Monk's superior : ABBOT
52
With 55-Across, town crier's cry : HEARYE
55
With 52-Across, Aaron Copland ballet : HEARYE
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Pipe fitting : ELL
59
Equivalent of C natural : BSHARP
61
___ A Sketch : ETCH
64
Samuel on the Supreme Court : ALITO
66
Cross inscription : INRI
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Final Four grp. : NCAA
68
River near the Vatican : TIBER
69
British prep school : ETON
70
Resistance units : OHMS
71
With 72-Across, noted maximum security prison : SING
72
With 71- and 72-Across, classic Louis Prima tune : SING
73
"___ ME" (phrase written on dirty cars) : WASH
Down
1
Poke fun at : MOCK
2
Tennis legend Arthur : ASHE
3
Neighborhood south of SoHo : CHINATOWN
4
Skipped, as a dance : SATOUT
5
Bubkes : ZILCH
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County in Colorado or New Mexico : OTERO
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"... ___ as it is in heaven" : ONEARTH
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Daybreak, to Donne : MORN
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Closes, as a fly : ZIPSUP
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Ironically, the last song in "A Chorus Line" : ONE
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She's got her OWN network : OPRAH
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___ jumbo : MUMBO
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Old Russian ruler : TSAR
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Old German ruler : KAISER
25
Exmaple for example, for example : TYPO
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Former New England Patriot Bruschi whose name is a bear to pronounce? : TEDY
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"GoldenEye" spy : BOND
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Vicinity : AREA
31
Called : RANG
34
What generals keep up their sleevies? : ARMIES
35
Program listings, briefly : SKED
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"Damn right!" : YOUBETCHA
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"Um ... sorry!" : ERNO
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"Saturday Night Live" sketch : SKIT
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687 days, on Mars : YEAR
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"I haven't a thing to ___!" : WEAR
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She had a hit with "Foolish" : ASHANTI
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RoboCop, e.g. : CYBORG
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"Toodles!" : BYENOW
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You can pack it : HEAT
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___ Island (immigrants' site) : ELLIS
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Excuse : ALIBI
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___ the side of caution : ERRON
57
Mimicking : APING
60
Hurries : HIES
62
Skyping needs : CAMS
63
Dish made of leftovers : HASH
65
Word after Big or top : TEN

Answer summary: 1 unique to this puzzle.

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