It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.
This web browser is not supported. Use Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or Edge for best results.

OH, SAY...

New York Times, Sunday, July 6, 2014

Author:
Daniel C. Bryant
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
94/22/20047/6/20140
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
6000300
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.58010
Daniel C. Bryant

This puzzle:

Rows: 21, Columns: 21 Words: 138, Blocks: 74 Missing: {JQZ} Spans: 1 This is puzzle # 9 for Mr. Bryant. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Daniel C. Bryant notes:
Although a number of my puzzles have been published over the years, I'm only now realizing there are sites for constructor comments. I'm a retired physician with, like many physicians ... read more

Although a number of my puzzles have been published over the years, I'm only now realizing there are sites for constructor comments. I'm a retired physician with, like many physicians (witness Roget of the thesaurus, Minor of the OED), a long-time interest in words. The idea of mapping notes across a grid came to me when I was getting back to playing the piano after many years. I also considered a rebus format, but think editors don't like those so much these days; and single letter notes running clear across the grid, but that sounded like an awful lot of work. In any event, I'm happy to see the final product appear, and on the Fourth of July weekend at that.

Jeff Chen notes:
Ah, THERE'S the Fourth of July puzzle I was expecting! An homage to THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER today. One aspect that I really enjoyed about this puzzle was a post-solve analysis of the ... read more

Ah, THERE'S the Fourth of July puzzle I was expecting! An homage to THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER today. One aspect that I really enjoyed about this puzzle was a post-solve analysis of the notes. Check out how much care Dan put into his layout of the musical STAFF. Not only does he place the notes in the correct musical intervals (SOL to MI is a third, SOL to DO is a fourth, etc.) but he gives us good approximations of the note durations (half notes, quarter notes, etc.). I like those careful touches.

Tribute puzzles can be hard to construct, because you run the risk of people thinking it's a straight forward tribute puzzle. Sometimes they tend to get boring if they're straightforward, more akin to reading a Wikipedia article instead of doing something fun. I like that Dan gives us interesting bits of trivia in addition to the obvious FRANCIS SCOTT KEY. Learning about the PRISONER EXCHANGE and the BRITISH PUB SONG was pretty fun. Who knew? Might explain some things about America today. Huh.

A few things did give me pause though, like what makes WHITNEY HOUSTON's performance better than ROSEANNE BARR's (don't answer that). Seriously though, WHITNEY HOUSTON but no JIMI HENDRIX? Sigh. I suppose there's no accounting for taste.

A lot of tough crossings today. Maybe not for experienced crossword solvers, but things like TITI/ISERE and ERST/AIT are going to be rough on some poor folks. When a puzzle has this many constraints, those types of things are going to happen. Going up to 140 words (this grid is 138) by breaking up FACTOTUM could have helped the former, but the latter is right in the midst of the second MI. Very tough. ASTI / STOA is right in that region too. I might have liked it better if two themers were eliminated (EIGHTEEN FOURTEEN doesn't do much for me, personally), and the scale notes spread out from the themers more. Just one man's opinion of course.

About Sunday puzzle word counts. Will's maximum is 140, and it's hard to adhere to. (Rich Norris at the LAT and Patti Varol at the Crosswords Club go up to 144.) So many times I wonder if ugly crossings and glue-y entries could be avoided by going above 140. But I do like how it forces constructors to work in longer fill, which usually enhances the solving experience. In today's case, as much as I like the word FACTOTUM, I'd much rather see it broken up, as the price of CRO, TITI, OTTS, ISERE in concentration was too high for me. It might have been just fine if there weren't already other compromises in the grid due to high themage — tough to say. Always difficult trade-offs in construction, especially since that opposite corner (the SW) turned out quite nice. You hate to break up a strong region like that.

Finally, a couple of beautiful clues. [Penn station?] repurposes a famous train station to clue IVY LEAGUE (it stretches the definition of "station" a bit, but in a fun way). And [Long arm] seemed so innocuous. I figured it had to be some term relating to NBA players or policemen (the long arm of the law). But it's simply a long "arm," in the sense of a firearm. Beautiful stuff.

1
A
2
D
3
I
4
N
5
S
6
R
7
E
8
S
9
T
10
U
11
P
12
F
13
A
14
C
15
T
16
O
17
T
18
U
19
M
20
B
I
D
E
T
21
I
N
T
O
N
E
22
I
R
R
I
T
A
T
E
23
A
S
T
O
R
24
F
R
A
N
C
I
25
S
S
C
O
T
T
K
E
Y
26
S
C
A
P
E
27
L
O
F
T
28
A
H
H
29
I
S
E
R
E
30
E
I
G
H
T
31
E
E
N
F
O
32
U
33
R
T
E
E
34
N
35
S
I
R
36
Y
T
D
37
S
E
A
G
R
E
38
E
39
N
40
B
41
R
42
I
T
I
S
43
H
44
P
45
U
46
B
S
O
N
G
47
A
D
O
48
B
49
E
50
S
51
L
I
V
E
52
I
L
L
E
R
53
C
L
A
I
R
O
L
54
I
C
Y
55
A
56
S
S
E
T
S
57
L
58
E
59
N
O
60
R
O
S
Y
61
S
O
L
62
S
T
O
A
63
G
A
S
O
L
64
S
O
W
65
T
H
E
66
S
T
A
R
S
67
P
68
A
N
G
L
E
D
69
B
A
N
N
70
E
71
R
72
A
M
I
73
H
E
M
I
C
74
N
C
A
A
75
B
I
O
76
P
77
A
G
E
78
E
R
S
T
79
A
80
L
T
A
I
R
81
E
E
N
82
E
C
U
A
83
D
84
O
R
85
S
O
I
R
S
86
E
L
I
A
87
P
E
E
R
I
N
88
W
89
H
90
I
T
N
E
Y
H
91
O
92
U
S
T
O
N
93
Y
O
K
94
O
H
A
M
A
95
R
N
C
96
A
97
D
98
E
99
P
R
I
S
O
N
100
E
101
R
102
E
103
X
C
H
A
104
N
105
G
106
E
107
M
I
C
108
A
109
H
110
I
R
T
111
R
O
B
E
112
A
R
I
E
L
113
B
A
L
T
I
114
M
O
R
E
115
H
116
A
R
B
O
R
117
P
O
S
T
E
118
I
N
A
W
H
I
L
E
119
O
T
O
O
L
E
120
P
L
A
I
N
121
T
A
T
T
O
O
E
D
122
D
E
L
T
A
S
123
Y
E
N
T
A
© 2014, The New York TimesNo. 0706 ( 23,616 )
Across
1
Serving edges : ADINS
6
Husband one's energy, say : RESTUP
12
General servant : FACTOTUM
20
Salle de bain fixture : BIDET
21
Enunciate slowly : INTONE
22
Get to : IRRITATE
23
First U.S. multimillionaire : ASTOR
24
Lawyer who wrote 65-Across : FRANCISSCOTTKEY
26
Land's end? : SCAPE
27
Throw up : LOFT
28
Sound of expiration : AHH
29
Skiing destination Val d'___ : ISERE
30
Year 24-Across wrote 65-Across : EIGHTEENFOURTEEN
35
Any knight : SIR
36
Jan. 1 till now : YTD
37
Crayola color akin to fern : SEAGREEN
40
What the music to 65-Across was, originally : BRITISHPUBSONG
47
Some American Indian homes : ADOBES
51
As it happens : LIVE
52
Better to a rapper, worse to a patient : ILLER
53
Herbal Essences shampoo company : CLAIROL
54
Standoffish : ICY
55
Fixed things? : ASSETS
57
James Douglas Muir ___ (TV host's birth name) : LENO
60
Looking up : ROSY
61
Sun: Sp. : SOL
62
Ancient walkway : STOA
63
Four-time N.B.A. All-Star Pau ___ : GASOL
64
Farm female : SOW
65
This puzzle's theme, whose first notes are indicated by shaded squares : THESTARSPANGLEDBANNER
72
Camus, to Sartre, for many years : AMI
73
Blood-related : HEMIC
74
Sports org. founded in 1906 : NCAA
75
Book jacket staple : BIO
76
It's bound to be turned : PAGE
78
Beginner for a while? : ERST
79
Star in the Summer Triangle : ALTAIR
81
"I should ___ die with pity, / To see another thus": Shak. : EEN
82
Country whose national currency is the U.S. dollar : ECUADOR
85
French evenings : SOIRS
86
"Essays of ___" : ELIA
87
What the curious may do : PEERIN
88
Performer who gave a memorable rendition of 65-Across in 1991 : WHITNEYHOUSTON
93
Setting of James Clavell's "Gai-Jin" : YOKOHAMA
95
G.O.P. org. : RNC
96
Gator's tail? : ADE
99
Mission that 24-Across was on when he wrote 65-Across : PRISONEREXCHANGE
107
He prophesied the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem : MICAH
110
N.Y.C. subway inits. : IRT
111
Cloth for a man of the cloth? : ROBE
112
"The Tempest" spirit : ARIEL
113
Where 24-Across was inspired to write 65-Across : BALTIMOREHARBOR
117
It handles lettres : POSTE
118
Later : INAWHILE
119
Best Actor nominee for "Venus," 2006 : OTOOLE
120
Vanilla : PLAIN
121
Inked : TATTOOED
122
Symbols of change : DELTAS
123
Gossip : YENTA
Down
1
Demean : ABASE
2
They're thrown in decathlons : DISCI
3
It may have a pet name : IDTAG
4
Greenhorn : NEOPHYTE
5
Overlapping fugue motifs : STRETTI
6
Long arm : RIFLE
7
"America's most innovative company" prior to its bankruptcy in 2001 : ENRON
8
Locale for this puzzle's shaded squares : STAFF
9
Sidekick of TV and film : TONTO
10
Where Michael Jordan played college ball: Abbr. : UNC
11
Louvre pyramid designer : PEI
12
Bit of spawn : FISHEGG
13
Sagittarius, with "the" : ARCHER
14
___-Magnon : CRO
15
New World monkey : TITI
16
Giant Mel and Pirate Ed : OTTS
17
Film units : TAKES
18
Birth places? : UTERI
19
___ Wolfsheim, gambler in "The Great Gatsby" : MEYER
25
Old Nick : SATAN
31
MS. managers : EDS
32
Initialism in a Beatles title : USSR
33
Old car company based in Lansing, Mich. : REO
34
Oscar-winning Patricia : NEAL
38
Author LeShan : EDA
39
Wrinkle-free, say : NOIRON
40
Second-rate : BLIST
41
Big copier maker : RICOH
42
Penn station? : IVYLEAGUE
43
Their, singularly : HISORHER
44
Crowd-___ : PLEASER
45
Last: Abbr. : ULT
46
Wanna-___ : BES
48
High level in karate : BROWNBELT
49
Counterpart of Aurora : EOS
50
Winking, maybe : SLY
53
Money in hand : COLDCASH
55
Italian province or its capital : ASTI
56
"Come ___?" (Italian greeting) : STA
57
Tarry : LAG
58
Immigrant's subj. : ESL
59
"Stay out" : NOENTRY
63
Health supplement co. : GNC
64
River of western Germany : SAAR
66
Like mascara in the rain : SMEARY
67
Some natl. leaders : PMS
68
River isle : AIT
69
Political writer Matt : BAI
70
Farm refrain : EIEIO
71
Farrow of MSNBC : RONAN
76
Oomph : PEP
77
See 79-Down : ACE
79
Get an ___ (77-Down) : AON
80
Bit of flimflam : LIE
83
God: It. : DIO
84
Peeling potatoes, perhaps : ONKP
85
Title name in a 2000 Eminem hit : STAN
86
Salad green : ESCAROLE
88
Sounded like a fan : WHIRRED
89
Speed : HASTE
90
Texter's qualification : IMO
91
"The Hobbit" figure : ORC
92
Blue : UNHAPPY
94
Player in orange and black : ORIOLE
96
Scope : AMBIT
97
Princess played by Naomi Watts : DIANA
98
Brilliance : ECLAT
100
Flynn of old film : ERROL
101
Metal worker? : ROBOT
102
Menace named after an African river : EBOLA
103
City whose name was the source of the word "sherry" : XERES
104
Jewish month : NISAN
105
"See?" : GETIT
106
Justice Kagan : ELENA
108
Periodic table abbr. : ATWT
109
Sunshine cracker : HIHO
114
"O Sole ___" : MIO
115
Brick transporter : HOD
116
Absorbed : ATE

Answer summary: 7 unique to this puzzle, 2 debuted here and reused later, 4 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

Found bugs or have suggestions?