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New York Times, Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Author:
Kevin Christian and Brad Wilber
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
105/22/20133/25/20194
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
0522010
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.64011
Kevin Christian
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
522/19/20056/10/201925
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
011201434
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.60001
Brad Wilber

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 76, Blocks: 38 Missing: {JKQZ} Spans: 3 This is puzzle # 5 for Mr. Christian. This is puzzle # 44 for Mr. Wilber. Jeff Chen's Puzzle of the Week pick. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Constructor notes:
KEVIN: I'm happy to be collaborating with Brad Wilber on his first themed puzzle in the NYT. Brad's a very experienced constructor, ... read more

KEVIN: I'm happy to be collaborating with Brad Wilber on his first themed puzzle in the NYT. Brad's a very experienced constructor, but he's only had themelesses in the NYT up to now.

I have two kids: Tim (age 13) and Kate (age 11). When they were small I used to read stories to them at night before they went to bed. We had many favorites that we read over and over, many of which were Dr. Seuss books.

My only regret about this puzzle is that I couldn't figure out a way to work in THE CAT IN THE HAT. That's 14 letters, which is sometimes an awkward theme answer length to work with.

I want to give credit where credit is due. Joel Fagliano, Will's editorial assistant, came up with the idea to use quotes from the books as clues, which I think is genius.

BRAD: By the time I came on board, Kevin had already designed the grid and filled it. I was immediately impressed with the presence of five theme entries plus a revealer. Kevin was concerned about some nose-wrinkling incidental fill (I remember RRR crossing RRS, for example), so together we did some "doctoring" of Dr. Seuss. I brainstormed different ideas for some of the seven-letter entries that crossed three Seuss titles. We tinkered with the upper middle and lower middle, especially, and did some sprucing up of corners.

Helping write Tuesday clues is kind of new ground for me, but we seem to have done all right based on what the final draft looks like!

Jeff Chen notes:
This puzzle tickled me. Perhaps it's the piles of drivel that I read to my daughter that make Dr. SEUSS stand out? Not all his work is ... read more

This puzzle tickled me. Perhaps it's the piles of drivel that I read to my daughter that make Dr. SEUSS stand out? Not all his work is amazing, but so much of it makes reading board books (over and over and over) at least palatable. Love the "Because after all, / A person's a person, no matter how small" quote from "Horton Hears a Who," for example. It's easy to make rhymes, not so easy to make ones with a neat story and a flowing meter.

Christian Bale's combover or Bradley Cooper's afro? I loved them both.

Kevin and Brad did a nice job of getting in a good amount of longer fill without introducing too much glue. I love MALE EGO, the easily bruised thing, and it's nice to see the full EMO BANDS instead of the usual EMO. I also liked getting Brad's erudite vibe in the mid-length stuff: PRECIS, NEWELS, MENSA, and ABSCAM, thankfully updated with an "American Hustle" clue.

I did notice a ton of 3-letter entries, which made me feel like I was switching from one answer to the next awfully fast. There are a whopping 28 of them, which explains it. Thankfully, most of them were innocuous, with just a bit of TES and UNA, and ABA and ANA kind of things.

I would have also liked to have the DR in Dr. SEUSS as part of the revealer, or at least SEUSS positioned in a central or final across slot. Tough to do with five themers, though.

Most of the time, I'm not wild about puzzles that have most of their oomph in the clues, but seeing snippets of Dr. SEUSS did it for me — beautiful idea. I'm big fans of both Brad (who publishes my stuff in the Chronicle of higher Education) and Kevin (who I roomed with at the ACPT two years ago), so I was glad to see a solid and entertaining Tuesday puzzle of out their collaboration.

1
R
2
U
3
M
4
A
5
B
6
S
7
C
8
A
9
M
10
S
11
N
12
U
13
G
14
A
B
A
15
L
A
C
U
N
A
16
P
O
G
O
17
H
O
R
18
T
O
N
H
E
A
R
19
S
A
W
H
O
20
M
A
L
E
E
G
O
21
I
T
S
22
T
O
N
23
L
O
24
T
25
N
Y
M
26
P
27
H
28
S
29
T
30
H
E
L
O
31
R
A
X
32
A
I
L
33
O
34
O
35
M
P
A
36
O
A
R
37
A
T
T
A
38
G
R
E
E
N
39
E
40
G
G
S
A
41
N
D
H
A
M
42
R
A
N
G
43
M
A
O
44
C
A
S
T
S
45
E
T
S
46
H
O
P
O
47
N
48
P
O
P
49
S
E
A
50
L
A
B
51
D
E
R
52
T
53
E
54
S
55
U
N
A
56
W
E
57
V
E
M
E
58
T
59
I
60
F
61
I
R
A
N
62
T
63
H
E
C
I
R
C
U
S
64
B
A
R
I
65
D
E
A
L
I
N
66
E
S
P
67
M
R
E
D
68
S
A
Y
S
S
O
69
E
S
S
© 2015, The New York TimesNo. 0714 ( 23,989 )
Across
1
Mai tai ingredient : RUM
4
Carter-era F.B.I. sting that inspired "American Hustle" : ABSCAM
10
Close-fitting : SNUG
14
Litigator's org. : ABA
15
Blank portion of a manuscript : LACUNA
16
___ stick : POGO
17
"Because, after all, / A person's a person, no matter how small" : HORTONHEARSAWHO
20
Easily bruised thing for half the world : MALEEGO
21
"___ a deal!" : ITS
22
Whole bunch : TON
23
Whole bunch : LOT
25
Satyrs' quarries : NYMPHS
29
"You're glumping the pond where the Humming-Fish hummed!" : THELORAX
32
Be bedridden : AIL
33
Start of a "Willy Wonka" song : OOMPA
36
Rowboat propeller : OAR
37
Lead-in to boy or girl : ATTA
38
"Would you eat them in a box? / Would you eat them with a fox?" : GREENEGGSANDHAM
42
Phoned : RANG
43
Chairman with a Little Red Book : MAO
44
Puts in a role : CASTS
45
U.F.O. pilots : ETS
46
"Red Ned Ted and Ed in bed" : HOPONPOP
49
Aquanaut's workplace : SEALAB
51
___ Spiegel (German weekly) : DER
52
Parisian "your" : TES
55
Italian article : UNA
56
"No need for introductions" : WEVEMET
59
"There's no other Showman / Who shows you a show with a Blindfolded Bowman!" : IFIRANTHECIRCUS
64
Italian city on the Adriatic : BARI
65
Give cards to : DEALIN
66
Subj. of Stephen King's "The Dead Zone" : ESP
67
Surprising conversationalist of classic TV : MRED
68
Declares to be true : SAYSSO
69
Twisty curve : ESS
Down
1
Chicago mayor Emanuel : RAHM
2
Lusitania sinker : UBOAT
3
Actress Thomas of TV : MARLO
4
Shaving lotion additive : ALOE
5
Bit of bling for the wrist : BANGLE
6
Group of fish : SCHOOL
7
Stick on a pub wall : CUE
8
Santa ___ winds : ANA
9
Certain breadstick dipping sauce : MARINARA
10
Twitch : SPASM
11
Currently : NOW
12
"Gross!" : UGH
13
S'mores marshmallow, after roasting : GOO
18
Something driven at a campsite : TENTPEG
19
River to Hades : STYX
24
Clearly superior, as an opponent : TOOGOOD
26
Routes : PATHS
27
Try to punch : HITAT
28
Broadsides : SLAMS
30
___ Solo of "Star Wars" : HAN
31
Univ. dorm supervisors : RAS
33
Shrek and Fiona, for two : OGRES
34
Get on a soapbox : ORATE
35
The brainy bunch? : MENSA
37
Globetrotter's electrical device : ADAPTER
39
Performers of songs with confessional lyrics : EMOBANDS
40
Generation ___ : GAP
41
Many a PX customer : NCO
46
Mandlikova of tennis : HANA
47
Posts on handrails : NEWELS
48
Brief summary : PRECIS
50
Gruesomely sensational : LURID
53
Awards show presider : EMCEE
54
Author of the books quoted at 17-, 29-, 38-, 46- and 59-Across : SEUSS
57
Chianti, in Chianti : VINO
58
Six of them make a fl. oz. : TSPS
59
Big Blue on the stock mkt. : IBM
60
"___ From the Madding Crowd" : FAR
61
Steam : IRE
62
Serving in Japanese ceremonies : TEA
63
67-Across food : HAY

Answer summary: 1 unique to this puzzle, 1 debuted here and reused later.

Found bugs or have suggestions?