It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.

New York Times, Saturday, April 25, 2015

Author:
James Mulhern
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
2411/16/20096/23/20176
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
012001011
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.60000
James Mulhern

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 72, Blocks: 27 Missing: {JQZ} This is puzzle # 13 for Mr. Mulhern. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
James Mulhern notes:
Ah, SKRILLEX. I can't say I'm the biggest fan of his music, but his name is too fun to ignore, and he's a pretty 'important' pop ... read more

Ah, SKRILLEX. I can't say I'm the biggest fan of his music, but his name is too fun to ignore, and he's a pretty "important" pop musician. Definitely grid-worthy, IMO. Still, I was glad to get LIGETI in there to class up the musical selection a bit.

Cool logo!

If I could take back one decision I made during construction of this puzz, I would opt not to cram REDDIT into the NW. It was a mistake to fetishize "freshness" at the expense of smoothness there — particularly since the answer has been scooped twice since I submitted this grid!

I'm quite proud of the NE. It's silky-smooth, with three fun down answers plus FOR NOW, FOODIE, SAME-SEX, and STRATEGO. That's basically what I'm striving for in every corner. Results may vary.

One aspect I find interesting about this puzzle is the unique vibe of each corner. The NW is a classic high word-count first corner, with a bold 1-A and a cool stack. The NE is all about smooth. The SE is the funky corner, with E-TILES and RSTLNE stacked. And the SW is the tricky vocabulary corner, with SCAPULAR and the challenging-to-parse OH YES I DO crossing LIGETI and AD UNIT. Hopefully that provides variety, and gives something for everyone.

Hope everyone has a great Friday night and Saturday. Enjoy!

Jill Denny notes:
Jeff and I often catch up over dinner by comparing notes about the daily crossword (note to self: is this why people keep refusing our ... read more

Jeff and I often catch up over dinner by comparing notes about the daily crossword (note to self: is this why people keep refusing our dinner party invitations?). More often than not, we settle out at roughly the same difficulty level, but a few clues can quickly tip the scales in one person's favor. Baseball, engineering, sci-fi, comedy, jazz ... Denny out, Chen in. Fashion, hip-hop, movies, politics, or French, and I'm all over it.

No surprise that this puzzle resonated more in my brain folds than in Jeff's, what with SKRILLEX, CHOCOLAT, PENA, and LOEWE. And if you're going to include a baseball player, PETE ROSE is one of the few names I recognize. While not easy-peasy, this was a pleasingly smooth grid for me. My only stumble was in the SW corner, with the unfamiliar LIGETI stacked on top of ADUNIT (a hillbilly's answer to "Whodunit?").

Vonnegut's oft-echoed line from Slaughterhouse-Five

Jeff, Jim, and I have had several conversations about differences in crossword opinion, most recently after I confessed my ignorance of comedians of the black-and-white movie era. After reading my post, Jim sent me an email professing a very gentle Canadian outrage that I had lumped together the Marx Brothers with the Three Stooges. He went on to write:

"This kind of cultural disconnect is what makes crossword commentary so interesting to me. It uncovers the hidden assumptions we don't know we have about what is aesthetically pleasing or not, and what is surely common knowledge or not. It also puts crossword editors into an impossible situation. You can't please everyone (so I've heard) but I wonder how possible it is to delight a significant percentage of your crossword audience."

It's those moments of delight that keep me coming back to crosswords, and I believe that Jeff and Jim would say the same thing. Two moments of delight from this puzzle:

  • I loved learning LUTRINE. My goal is to use it in an email at work by the end of the month.
  • A very special nod to VONNEGUT, a proud Hoosier. This is only his third appearance in the Shortz era. Happy to see his name, sad that he is gone. One of the greats.
1
S
2
K
3
R
4
I
5
L
6
L
7
E
8
X
9
O
10
R
11
D
12
E
13
R
14
S
15
T
H
E
D
O
O
R
S
16
F
O
R
N
O
W
17
R
A
D
I
O
E
R
A
18
F
O
O
D
I
E
19
O
K
D
20
T
W
A
N
21
G
22
F
O
N
D
A
23
V
I
I
24
I
25
E
N
D
E
26
D
27
P
O
R
T
28
E
S
T
O
29
P
30
D
O
N
O
31
R
32
T
A
B
33
N
R
34
A
35
S
T
R
A
36
T
E
G
O
37
S
38
O
39
V
I
E
T
40
S
41
S
A
M
E
S
E
X
42
C
H
O
C
O
L
A
43
T
44
G
B
S
45
A
Y
N
46
P
A
N
A
47
M
48
O
T
49
T
50
E
51
R
52
P
E
N
53
A
54
S
A
L
A
55
D
56
S
O
T
S
57
U
S
E
R
58
S
59
A
L
L
O
60
T
61
M
I
T
62
L
I
G
E
T
63
I
64
Y
O
U
R
65
C
A
L
L
66
A
D
U
N
I
T
67
U
N
B
E
A
T
E
N
68
R
O
T
A
R
Y
69
P
E
T
E
R
O
S
E
© 2015, The New York TimesNo. 0425 ( 23,909 )
Across
1. Leader in electronic music with multiple Grammys : SKRILLEX
9. Elks and others : ORDERS
15. 1960s-'70s band that took its name from an Aldous Huxley title : THEDOORS
16. Temporarily : FORNOW
17. Golden age for voice acting : RADIOERA
18. Gourmet : FOODIE
19. Green-lit : OKD
20. Sound of an arrow being shot : TWANG
22. Henry ___ : FONDA
23. Henry ___ : VIII
25. Wound up : ENDED
27. Computer part : PORT
28. Bar : ESTOP
30. One who may give you his heart? : DONOR
32. Brand name with 2/3 capital letters in its logo : TAB
33. Org. with many magazines : NRA
35. Capture-the-flag game : STRATEGO
37. Space racers : SOVIETS
41. Like some unions : SAMESEX
42. 2000 film set in France that was nominated for five Academy Awards : CHOCOLAT
44. Literary inits. : GBS
45. First name in Objectivism : AYN
46. ___ Games : PANAM
48. Leonine : lion :: lutrine : ___ : OTTER
52. Secretary of energy under Clinton : PENA
54. Leaves on the side? : SALAD
56. They're often blitzed : SOTS
57. Internet statistic : USERS
59. Parcel : ALLOT
61. Alma mater for Benjamin Netanyahu : MIT
62. Composer György whose music was featured in Kubrick films : LIGETI
64. "It's not my place to decide" : YOURCALL
66. Marketing space : ADUNIT
67. Never topped : UNBEATEN
68. Group with the motto "Service Above Self" : ROTARY
69. 17-time All-Star of the 1960s-'80s : PETEROSE
Down
1. Put in effort : STROVE
2. Some business casual attire : KHAKIS
3. Website with "Ask Me Anything" interviews : REDDIT
4. First name in infamy : IDI
5. Boodle : LOOT
6. High-end fashion brand : LOEWE
7. Mailing a letter, perhaps : ERRAND
8. Chalk talk symbols : XSANDOS
9. Cockeyed : OFF
10. Place for a dish : ROOF
11. Wilt : DROOP
12. Notable features of David Foster Wallace books : ENDNOTES
13. Possible effect of doping : ROIDRAGE
14. Uncomfortably tight spot, informally : SWEATBOX
21. Sign on a saloon door : GENTS
24. Kind of bond : IONIC
26. Headgear for Eminem : DORAG
29. Awaiting a sex change, say : PREOP
31. Reckless tough guy : RAMBO
34. Global superpower? : ATLAS
36. Checks : TESTS
37. Religious garment suspended from the shoulders : SCAPULAR
38. Emphatic rebuttal : OHYESIDO
39. Author who created the fatalistic optometrist Billy Pilgrim : VONNEGUT
40. Unesco World Heritage Site on the Arabian Peninsula : SANAA
43. Count : TALLYUP
47. Danson's role on "Cheers" : MALONE
49. Shade of red : TOMATO
50. Most plentiful pieces in a certain board game : ETILES
51. Bonus round freebies on "Wheel of Fortune" : RSTLNE
53. "In the ___" (Nixon memoir) : ARENA
55. "The beacon of the wise," per Shakespeare : DOUBT
58. Get moving : STIR
60. Ring bearer : TREE
63. Plural suffix : ITY
65. Mini, e.g. : CAR

Answer summary: 5 unique to this puzzle, 1 debuted here and reused later, 1 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

Found bugs or have suggestions?