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DOUBLE DIGITS

New York Times, Sunday, September 6, 2015

Author:
Patrick Berry
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
2297/11/199911/4/20182
SunMonTueWedThuFriSatVariety
741241679512
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.54980
Patrick Berry

This puzzle:

Rows: 21, Columns: 21 Words: 142, Blocks: 76 Missing: {QZ} This is puzzle # 202 for Mr. Berry. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Jeff Chen notes:
Patrick uses double-digit numbers from phrases and titles for a rebus. I particularly liked 54 40 OR FIGHT — for some reason, my high school friends and I took to yelling it around ... read more

Patrick uses double-digit numbers from phrases and titles for a rebus. I particularly liked 54 40 OR FIGHT — for some reason, my high school friends and I took to yelling it around school. It has a nice rhythm to it.

54° 40′ or fight!

Not easy to find pairs of theme entries famous enough to be crossworthy. 48 HRS is a big hit movie, and Patrick does so well to pair it with THE LOWER 48. What a nice phrase that we'll otherwise never see in crosswords.

I also liked how Patrick kept all his across theme answers symmetrical. Other constructors might have willy-nilly strewn themers around without any regard to pairing up the lengths — 54 40 OR FIGHT and THE LOWER 48, for example — but not Patrick.

Paired double-digit numbers couldn't have been easy to find. There must be so many like 76 TROMBONES which don't have a useable match. I thought Patrick chose well for eight out of his nine, CENTURY 21 / 21 GRAMS the one I guessed (wrongly) on.

I'm sure I've seen CENTURY 21 signs around, but I remembered it as CENTURY 50 for some reason. And not having seen 21 GRAMS, that was a random guess. Doesn't 50 GRAMS seem more metric? That's what I'm saying! Anyhoo, seems like 21 is ripe for something a little snazzier and memorable, perhaps 21 JUMP STREET or a 21 GUN SALUTE. I have a feeling it's a compromise he made to keep symmetry in his themers — always the trade-offs.

Surprising to see PB go to 142 words, past the usual max of 140. Rebus puzzles are tough to create, especially when you don't have much flexibility in themers, but I've gotten used to seeing Patrick pull off the impossible. Also a bit odd to see AGIN in a Berry 1-Down.

Overall a nice, entertaining solve, perhaps a little more straightforward than I've come to expect from a PB. I spent way too much time trying to figure out where the extra layer was hidden — did the numbers all relate in some way? Or if you connect them sequentially, they form a shape?

Alas, no.

1
A
2
L
3
T
4
A
5
R
6
A
7
W
8
L
9
A
10
C
11
C
12
T
13
C
14
L
15
A
16
P
17
S
18
G
U
I
D
E
19
R
A
I
L
20
C
I
A
O
21
C
R
E
D
I
T
22
I
L
L
A
T
E
A
S
E
23
T
A
R
P
24
H
A
V
A
N
A
25
N
U
T
M
E
G
26
E
W
27
E
R
28
54
40
29
O
R
F
I
G
H
T
30
12
A
N
31
G
R
Y
M
E
32
N
33
N
I
T
34
I
O
U
35
A
36
C
37
E
38
M
A
R
39
N
O
S
E
40
J
41
O
B
S
42
M
O
L
E
43
V
E
N
44
D
45
L
I
46
T
47
S
T
A
R
R
48
F
U
S
E
S
49
I
N
G
A
50
P
H
51
D
52
S
53
N
E
E
54
S
O
N
55
A
T
A
R
56
I
57
S
E
R
E
58
N
59
A
60
A
P
R
I
61
L
62
15
63
N
U
G
E
N
64
T
65
B
O
X
E
S
66
S
K
I
M
67
I
M
68
F
69
C
R
I
S
T
O
70
52
P
I
C
K
71
U
P
72
C
A
73
S
S
I
E
74
A
Y
N
75
E
R
76
A
S
77
S
C
O
R
E
78
E
T
H
A
N
E
79
21
G
80
R
A
M
S
81
M
O
U
S
E
82
S
83
S
A
L
U
D
84
A
R
E
T
85
H
86
A
87
T
A
C
T
88
M
I
T
E
89
F
90
A
91
R
M
S
92
R
O
M
93
P
94
S
95
H
U
96
N
97
U
S
E
R
98
L
I
E
S
99
C
I
T
Y
G
I
100
R
101
L
102
N
O
103
S
104
A
S
S
105
O
R
B
106
G
O
D
107
13
G
O
I
108
N
G
O
N
109
30
110
T
H
E
111
L
O
W
E
112
R
113
48
114
N
C
A
A
115
D
O
R
116
S
117
A
118
L
119
S
O
C
I
A
L
120
O
H
121
N
O
122
I
N
123
A
G
R
O
O
V
E
124
A
S
C
O
T
S
125
B
R
E
R
126
S
C
R
E
E
C
H
E
S
127
M
E
A
N
S
128
E
S
A
I
129
E
Y
E
130
S
K
O
R
T
© 2015, The New York TimesNo. 0906 ( 24,043 )
Across
1. One raised in church? : ALTAR
6. Beltmaking tool : AWL
9. Emailer's need: Abbr. : ACCT
13. Hand-made percussion : CLAPS
18. Assembly line track : GUIDERAIL
20. Word of parting : CIAO
21. Ability to borrow : CREDIT
22. On edge : ILLATEASE
23. Something saved for a rainy day : TARP
24. Caribbean capital : HAVANA
25. Nog topper : NUTMEG
26. Vessel with a spout : EWER
28. Rallying cry during the Polk administration : 5440ORFIGHT
30. 1957 film set almost entirely in one room : 12ANGRYMEN
33. Unimportant flaw : NIT
34. Payment promise : IOU
35. Master : ACE
38. Lessen the value of, maybe : MAR
39. Changes to the bill? : NOSEJOBS
42. Infiltrator : MOLE
43. Hawk on the street : VEND
45. Blotto : LIT
47. Fab Four surname : STARR
48. Becomes one : FUSES
49. "Young Frankenstein" assistant : INGA
50. Degrees of magnitude? : PHDS
53. "Kinsey" star, 2004 : NEESON
55. Early manufacturer of home computers : ATARI
57. Court figure Williams : SERENA
60. Return date? : APRIL15
63. Ted with a guitar : NUGENT
65. Moving day need : BOXES
66. 0%, in a way : SKIM
67. Economic org. in D.C. : IMF
69. Italian religious figure : CRISTO
70. Game that people rarely agree to play twice : 52PICKUP
72. Zach's old flame in "A Chorus Line" : CASSIE
74. First name in Objectivism : AYN
75. Historical topics : ERAS
77. Make a point : SCORE
78. Byproduct in petroleum refining : ETHANE
79. Alejandro G. Iñárritu film with the tagline "How much does life weigh?" : 21GRAMS
81. Hunts, as a house cat might : MOUSES
83. Glass raiser's word : SALUD
84. "___ Arrives" (1967 soul album) : ARETHA
87. It "teaches you when to be silent," per Disraeli : TACT
88. Wee bit : MITE
89. Growing businesses : FARMS
92. Lively comedies : ROMPS
95. Nomadic conqueror : HUN
97. Dealer's customer : USER
98. Trust eroders : LIES
99. Kid-lit's Eloise, e.g. : CITYGIRL
102. Parts of many passwords: Abbr. : NOS
104. Imbecile : ASS
105. Ornament shape : ORB
106. "Oh wow!" : GOD
107. 2004 rom-com in which a middle schooler is transformed into an adult overnight : 13GOINGON30
110. Contiguous U.S. states, colloquially : THELOWER48
114. Org. with conferences : NCAA
115. At the back : DORSAL
119. Bee, e.g. : SOCIAL
120. Cry of dismay : OHNO
122. Routine-bound : INAGROOVE
124. Beau Brummell accessories : ASCOTS
125. ___ Rabbit : BRER
126. Car chase sounds : SCREECHES
127. Ability : MEANS
128. Morales of "NYPD Blue" : ESAI
129. Hieroglyphic symbol : EYE
130. L.P.G.A. garment : SKORT
Down
1. "I'm ___ it!" (hick's nix) : AGIN
2. Doozy : LULU
3. Use a lance : TILT
4. 1960s-'70s police drama : ADAM12
5. Make another movie together, say : RETEAM
6. Roadside assistance org. : AAA
7. Harder to fool : WISER
8. "Inside ___ Davis" (Coen brothers film) : LLEWYN
9. Adams, Monroe or Grant : ACTRESS
10. The Company, in govt. lingo : CIA
11. 1960s buddy cop sitcom, informally : CAR54
12. Pop group? : TOP40
13. Pottery, e.g. : CRAFT
14. Israelite tribe progenitor : LEVI
15. Slow movements : ADAGIOS
16. Simple camera's aperture : PINHOLE
17. Square figures : STATUES
19. Pertaining to a sovereign : REGNAL
21. Rock or Pine : CHRIS
27. Broody rock genre : EMO
29. Not working, say : ONBREAK
31. Film set assistants : GRIPS
32. Stocking fabric : NET
35. Colombia's national airline : AVIANCA
36. Re/Max competitor : CENTURY21
37. Instantly likable : ENGAGING
40. "The Brady Bunch" kid : JAN
41. Resource in the board game The Settlers of Catan : ORE
42. Tax-exempt bond, for short : MUNI
44. Has the temerity : DARES
46. Rock band from Athens, Ga. : THEB52S
48. Modern rock and news/talk, for two : FORMATS
51. Bit of rain : DROP
52. Title IX target : SEXISM
54. Liven (up) : SPICE
56. Visibly moved : INTEARS
58. Maker of candy wafers : NECCO
59. Invite to dinner, say : ASKOUT
61. Singer with the band Cult Jam : LISALISA
62. Figurative duration of short-lived fame : 15MINUTES
64. Mel who co-wrote "The Christmas Song" : TORME
66. Filibuster feature : SPEECH
68. Birdseed containers : FEEDERS
71. Minor predecessor? : URSA
73. SeaWorld performer : SHAMU
76. On both sides of : ASTRIDE
80. Colorado State's team : RAMS
82. Deeply offended : STUNG
85. Selling well : HOT
86. First name of Dickens's Little Dorrit : AMY
89. Clues to a sunken ship's location : FLOTSAM
90. Diving helmet attachment : AIRHOSE
91. Hitchcock film with a nameless heroine : REBECCA
93. Rating first used for "Red Dawn" : PG13
94. Italian gentlemen : SIGNORI
96. Relentless faultfinder : NOODGE
99. Religious outfits : COWLS
100. "Arabian Nights" predator : ROC
101. Serve as a go-between : LIAISE
103. Siesta sounds : SNORES
106. Bearded ones : GOATS
108. Drew in books : NANCY
109. NBC sitcom set at NBC : 30ROCK
111. Symbol of England : LION
112. Spa wear : ROBE
113. Eddie Murphy's big-screen debut : 48HRS
116. West End district : SOHO
117. Maintain : AVER
118. For fear that : LEST
121. Sponsor of some PBS programs : NEA
123. Word often shortened to its middle letter in texts : ARE

Answer summary: 18 unique to this puzzle, 2 debuted here and reused later, 2 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

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