It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.
This web browser is not supported. Use Chrome, Edge, Safari, or Firefox for best results.

New York Times, Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Author:
Christina Iverson
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutCollabs
17/30/20190
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
0010000
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.54000
Christina Iverson

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 76, Blocks: 35 Missing: {JQVZ} This is the debut puzzle for Ms. Iverson. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Christina Iverson notes:
I'm (obviously!) very excited to be making my NYT debut. I have only been solving puzzles for about a year, and pretty quickly got ... read more

I'm (obviously!) very excited to be making my NYT debut. I have only been solving puzzles for about a year, and pretty quickly got interested in construction. This was my first "real" submission after working with my very helpful crossword mentors, Ross Trudeau and Amanda Chung earlier this year. (I now know that my first two submissions, last year, were embarrassingly bad!) If anyone is interested in construction, I'd highly recommend finding a mentor.

I knew I wanted to do something relating to capitals, and I originally just had capitals hidden in rather boring words (comPARISon and anticLIMActic, e.g.). Amanda suggested that I needed a revealer and a "why" to my puzzle. Then I thought of using "CAPITALIZE" as a revealer and making wacky phrases by adding a letter to the beginning of a word, making it start with a capital, like "OSLOW JAMS" and "TUNISEXUAL" but they were hard to clue, and just a little too wacky. Once I thought of START-UP CAPITAL I put this puzzle together, and I think it turned out pretty OK. If I could go back, I'd try to get rid of ORLY and OSIER, which I don't think belong in an early-week puzzle. My favorite entry is BABY BUMPS, which I was excited to sneak in, as the mom of a 1-year old.

Jeff Chen notes:
Debut! I've had the pleasure of working on a few collabs with Christina over the past two months — we'll have a neat Sunday ... read more

Debut! I've had the pleasure of working on a few collabs with Christina over the past two months — we'll have a neat Sunday coming in the near future. She's a hard worker, takes feedback seriously, learns from it, and tries to think of solvers' preferences over her own. Everything you like to see out of a new constructor.

STARTUP / CAPITAL is a beautiful phrase to play upon. I was in the startup world in a previous career, and STARTUP CAPITAL was such a concern for the first six months. Then again while raising our Series B. Then yet again with Series C. It wasn't until we went public that I started to feel (a little) less worried about the entire endeavor going belly up.

My first impression was that it would have been great to incorporate longer capitals. Lo and behold, I couldn't find a single world CAPITAL that was longer than five letters that would have fit. Huh!

Not only that, but I couldn't find any other CAPITALs that would work, period. Double huh! That makes it a surprisingly tight theme.

One knock is that LOME, the capital of Togo, shouldn't be in the fill. Many solvers won't notice this inclusion, but it's a point of inelegance that distracted during my solve, making me wonder if it was somehow thematic.

(Ah, I just though of LO MEIN NOODLES.)

I appreciated the long bonuses. BABY BUMPS was especially nice – Christina mentioned that it's her desire as a constructor to incorporate fill that might delight solvers in demographics that have been historically overlooked. This is a great thing for the NYT crossword. I imagine there are tons of mothers or soon-to-be mothers that will love seeing BABY BUMPS in their puzzle.

I bet with what she's learned now, Christina would redo the SE corner. ENERO / DELA / DRED isn't great. That's all dictated by the PROTIP / P DIDDY selections. As much as I love the bonuses, the gluey bits are too high a price to pay, especially for an early-week puzzle.

Strong debut! I'd say I'm guessing we'll see more solid work from Christina in the future, but having worked in the trenches with her, I'm 100% sure of that.

1
S
2
L
3
O
4
T
5
A
6
X
7
I
8
S
9
B
10
A
11
S
12
K
13
S
14
T
A
S
E
15
P
I
T
T
16
D
I
N
A
H
17
R
U
I
N
18
R
I
G
A
19
M
A
R
O
L
E
20
I
R
E
N
21
E
22
I
S
A
Y
23
W
E
D
24
P
A
R
I
S
25
H
26
P
R
I
E
S
27
T
S
28
S
T
O
O
L
S
29
A
U
30
T
31
O
32
C
33
A
34
B
35
A
R
M
S
36
F
37
O
X
I
E
R
38
S
T
A
39
R
T
U
P
40
C
A
P
I
T
A
L
41
I
M
B
U
E
S
42
D
E
N
T
43
S
L
Y
44
S
O
Y
S
45
P
R
O
T
I
46
P
47
B
E
48
R
49
N
I
E
S
A
N
D
50
E
51
R
52
S
53
F
54
L
U
55
H
O
L
A
56
G
I
N
U
P
57
R
O
M
58
E
O
R
O
M
59
E
60
O
61
D
E
L
A
62
A
M
P
E
D
63
T
O
T
O
64
D
R
E
D
65
T
E
S
L
A
66
S
N
A
P
67
Y
O
R
E
© 2019, The New York TimesNo. 0730 ( 25,466 )

Support XWord Info today

Pay now and get access for a year.

1. Select account level
2. Choose how to pay
Across
1
What a coin may go in : SLOT
5
___ & Allies (classic board game) : AXIS
9
Lies lazily in the sun : BASKS
14
Stun with a gun : TASE
15
Brad of "Fight Club" : PITT
16
Someone's in the kitchen with her, in an old song : DINAH
17
Wreck : RUIN
18
Petty set of procedures : RIGAMAROLE
20
Woman who's bid good night in an old song : IRENE
22
"___, old chap!" : ISAY
23
"With this ring, I thee ___" : WED
24
Local officials in dioceses : PARISHPRIESTS
28
Seats in many bars : STOOLS
29
Car : AUTO
32
Car with a meter : CAB
35
Sites of biceps and triceps : ARMS
36
More cunning : FOXIER
38
With 40-Across, money required to open a business ... or a hint to 18-, 24-, 47- and 57-Across : STARTUP
40
See 38-Across : CAPITAL
41
Permeates : IMBUES
42
Feature of many an old car : DENT
43
Cunning : SLY
44
Some beans : SOYS
45
"Here's how experts handle this" : PROTIP
47
Longest-serving Independent member of Congress in U.S. history : BERNIESANDERS
53
Vaccine target : FLU
55
Greeting in Guatemala : HOLA
56
Generate by dubious means : GINUP
57
Part of a Juliet soliloquy : ROMEOROMEO
61
Crème ___ crème : DELA
62
Juiced (up) : AMPED
63
Noted terrier in a 1939 film : TOTO
64
Scott of an 1857 Supreme Court case : DRED
65
Inventor with a coil named after him : TESLA
66
Lead-in to chat or dragon : SNAP
67
Time long past : YORE
Down
1
Unit of bacon : STRIP
2
Actress Linney of "The Truman Show" : LAURA
3
Common basket-weaving material : OSIER
4
Something you'll have to go to court for? : TENNIS
5
Financing letters : APR
6
Midnight, on a grandfather clock : XII
7
Edie Sedgwick and Kendall Jenner, for two : ITGIRLS
8
Condition of inactivity : STASIS
9
They're almost always shared by twins, informally : BDAYS
10
Televise : AIR
11
Winter play outfits : SNOWSUITS
12
Leafy vegetable that can be green or purple : KALE
13
Place to store a lawn mower : SHED
19
Fannie ___ : MAE
21
Locale for a manor : ESTATE
25
Falcon-headed Egyptian god : HORUS
26
Circumstance's partner : POMP
27
Car with a meter : TAXI
30
Blue-green shade : TEAL
31
Alternative to Charles de Gaulle : ORLY
32
Some CBS police dramas : CSIS
33
Prefix with sphere : ATMO
34
Obvious signs of pregnancy : BABYBUMPS
36
Fruity soda brand : FANTA
37
Selecting, with "for" : OPTING
39
Ploy : RUSE
40
Tops of corp. ladders : CEOS
42
"That'll never happen!" : DREAMON
45
Ones doing loops and barrel rolls : PILOTS
46
Onetime stage name of Sean Combs : PDIDDY
48
"The Mary Tyler Moore Show" spinoff : RHODA
49
___'easter : NOR
50
Month after diciembre : ENERO
51
Side of many a protractor : RULER
52
Garden tool : SPADE
53
___ row (some blocks in a college town) : FRAT
54
Togolese city on the Gulf of Guinea : LOME
58
Fish that can be electric : EEL
59
Second letter after epsilon : ETA
60
"Alley ___!" : OOP

Answer summary: 5 unique to this puzzle, 1 debuted here and reused later.

Found bugs or have suggestions?