It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.

New York Times, Saturday, April 15, 2017

Author: Peter Wentz
Editor: Will Shortz
Peter Wentz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
289/27/200710/20/20170
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
100121113
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.83005

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 68, Blocks: 32 Missing: {QZ} This is puzzle # 26 for Mr. Wentz. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Peter Wentz notes: Looking at this puzzle again with fresh eyes, it feels clean and well arranged, and is of solid quality all around. Though, I do ... more
Peter Wentz notes:

Looking at this puzzle again with fresh eyes, it feels clean and well arranged, and is of solid quality all around. Though, I do wish I had added a little more sizzle with the longer answers. There are many good entries, and even more excellent clues, many of which belong to the editorial team, so this should (hopefully!) still be a fun solve.

Jeff Chen notes: Wide-open middle! So cool to see the three stair-stacked acrosses (HIT THE BRICKS atop SPACE TOURISTS atop PHONE SERVICE), with so ... more
Jeff Chen notes:

Wide-open middle! So cool to see the three stair-stacked acrosses (HIT THE BRICKS atop SPACE TOURISTS atop PHONE SERVICE), with so many long down answers running through it. The grid breathes so well; the solving flow so pretty, so many ways to get into each section.

Love the pairing of HIT THE BRICKS and SPACE TOURISTS. Talk about getting out of town! I wasn't familiar with THE MECHANIC, but BRIMSTONE, NOISEMAKERS, CLASS ACT, DOG PARKS = such good usage of those long down slots.

CLASS ACT and DOG PARKS particularly shine — not because they're better than other entries, but because these corners often leave unfulfilled potential on the table within this kind of stair-stacked design. Peter does almost equally well in the opposite corner, with PITFALL / SHOO AWAY / PONYTAIL, even a TOY CAR to boot. A stair-stacked set of acrosses can make these corners inflexible and a bit blah to ugly, but not today.

Peter's grids typically are so snazzy and ultra-clean, that AWAG, THORO (do people actually use this?) and even IOC stood out a bit. They'd be virtually ignorable for most anyone else, but Peter has set an incredibly high bar for himself.

I don't mind a double dose of THE in THE MECHANIC and HIT THE BRICKS — it's such a common filler word — but getting a third in THE JONESES felt like too much. Maybe it would have been different if it had been with a shorter entry like THE FED or THE UN, but …

Peter did a great job of incorporating some rare letters in the south, that J and X worked in so smoothly. Usually, a tiny region's job is to be ignorable and not stand out with crossword glue but to get some JIM Kirk, TOXIN, even RATTY and YAY ME makes that corner a real asset to the puzzle.

It's so tough to achieve both sizzling and smooth in a wide-open 68-word grid like this. PHONE SERVICE didn't do much for me, nor OMELETTES, nor SHOO AWAY. Might not seem like too much wastage, but those take up some prime real estate. Still, I'm in agreement with Peter — well executed overall.

1
S
2
T
3
A
4
T
5
O
6
R
7
A
8
L
9
B
10
L
11
C
12
D
13
S
14
O
A
T
H
15
M
E
T
A
L
16
B
L
O
T
17
C
H
E
E
18
S
E
C
A
K
E
19
J
A
G
R
20
K
I
M
M
E
L
21
D
E
A
22
F
23
S
P
A
24
S
T
P
E
T
E
25
R
26
K
A
27
N
S
A
N
28
I
O
C
29
T
O
30
T
31
O
32
B
O
A
R
D
33
H
34
I
T
T
H
E
35
B
R
I
C
K
S
36
S
37
P
A
C
E
T
O
U
R
I
S
T
S
38
P
H
O
N
E
S
E
R
V
I
C
E
39
I
O
N
I
C
40
N
O
R
M
41
M
42
U
43
D
44
T
O
Y
C
A
45
R
46
E
S
47
I
A
S
O
48
N
49
F
A
T
50
P
A
51
W
52
S
53
T
A
K
E
T
O
54
A
W
A
55
G
56
T
H
E
57
J
O
N
E
S
E
S
58
L
A
I
R
59
T
O
X
I
N
60
R
U
D
E
61
L
Y
L
E
62
Y
A
Y
M
E
63
S
P
U
D
© 2017, The New York TimesNo. 0415 ( 24,630 )
Across Down
1. Walks or runs : STAT
5. 3D White brand : ORALB
10. Some TVs : LCDS
14. Formal guarantee : OATH
15. Microwave no-no : METAL
16. Try to contain, in a way, as a spill : BLOT
17. Rich dessert : CHEESECAKE
19. Hockey legend Jaromir : JAGR
20. Colbert competitor : KIMMEL
21. ___ ears : DEAF
23. Place to work up a sweat : SPA
24. Metaphorical rock of Matthew 16:18 : STPETER
26. Auntie Em, e.g. : KANSAN
28. Org. with biennial bids : IOC
29. Band that shares its name with a film canine : TOTO
32. Get on : BOARD
33. Skedaddle : HITTHEBRICKS
36. Ones counting down to vacation time? : SPACETOURISTS
38. It's included in many bundles : PHONESERVICE
39. ___ compound : IONIC
40. What you can expect : NORM
41. Joe : MUD
44. Place for a decal, maybe : TOYCAR
46. 1988 N.F.L. M.V.P. from the Cincinnati Bengals : ESIASON
49. Epithet for Louis VI, with "the" : FAT
50. Mitts : PAWS
53. Pick up quickly : TAKETO
54. Like many canine tails, quaintly : AWAG
56. Object of envious comparison : THEJONESES
58. Hideout : LAIR
59. Benzene or lead : TOXIN
60. "How ___!" : RUDE
61. Sandy who won the 1985 British Open : LYLE
62. "Man, I did good!" : YAYME
63. Chips, initially : SPUD
1. Clobbers : SOCKS
2. Stop for James Cook when circumnavigating the globe : TAHITI
3. Getting back to speed, musically : ATEMPO
4. 2011 Jason Statham action flick : THEMECHANIC
5. Dishes often served au fromage : OMELETTES
6. ___ hall : REC
7. Slightly : ATAD
8. Reservoir, e.g. : LAKE
9. Dim or grim : BLEAK
10. U.T.'s ___ Library : LBJ
11. Very fair, admirable sort : CLASSACT
12. Urban exercise areas : DOGPARKS
13. DNA pair : STRANDS
18. Ready follower? : SET
22. Chintz, e.g. : FABRIC
25. Lacking scruples : ROTTEN
27. Annual party favors : NOISEMAKERS
30. Sweeping, for short : THORO
31. Works of a lifetime : OEUVRE
34. Feature of Earth, Mars and Pluto : ICECAP
35. Symbol of biblical wrath : BRIMSTONE
36. Wave off : SHOOAWAY
37. Women's World Cup sight : PONYTAIL
38. Unforeseen trouble : PITFALL
42. Runs through : USESUP
43. School closing? : DOTEDU
45. In serious disrepair : RATTY
47. Swimmer Thorpe with five Olympic gold medals : IAN
48. Looked (around) : NOSED
51. Cousin of "OMG!" : WHOA
52. Hot : SEXY
55. Inits. on a master's application : GRE
57. "Star Trek" captain, to friends : JIM

Answer summary: 4 unique to this puzzle.

Found bugs or have suggestions?