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DOUBLE-CROSSED

New York Times, Sunday, March 20, 2016

Author:
Joel Fagliano
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
6510/22/20096/16/20196
SunMonTueWedThuFriSatVariety
16911910325
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.64351
Joel Fagliano

This puzzle:

Rows: 21, Columns: 21 Words: 134, Blocks: 73 Missing: {XZ} This is puzzle # 47 for Mr. Fagliano. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Notepad: When this puzzle is completed, take the answer to each starred clue and cross out all the letters used twice. The leftover letters will spell an appropriate word, reading top to bottom.
Joel Fagliano notes:
I came up with this idea around the time of my symmetry puzzle, which had a somewhat similar concept of every letter being used twice except for one. I knew I wanted the extra letters ... read more

I came up with this idea around the time of my symmetry puzzle, which had a somewhat similar concept of every letter being used twice except for one.

I knew I wanted the extra letters to spell something, and at first I was aiming for "The Leftovers", the hit HBO show. But I couldn't find a good leftover V example, and I wasn't even sure some solvers would know that show.

For about two months, I tried to come up with these out of my head/through manual searching. I'd take a word that already had most of the letters used twice (COMMON, e.g.) and then search on phrases with that word (COMMON SENSE would've worked, leaving over the C, for example). I had about 15 or 16 of these, but they didn't spell anything apt and I was generating insane-looking pages in my notebook of scribbled out words. I realized I was never going to be able to get a good set on my own.

So I reached out to Jeff, who was able to write a script that generated a list of all the answers in his database that fit this pattern. From there, I was able to fill in the holes of the letters I still needed to spell out the meta answer. Huge shout-out to him for his help in putting this together, and his general role in helping constructors everywhere with their craft.

Jeff Chen notes:
I've highlighted the special letters below — it was tough for me to see them all at once. (I imagine the impact of today's theme will be much bigger for paper solvers, who can easily ... read more

I've highlighted the special letters below — it was tough for me to see them all at once. (I imagine the impact of today's theme will be much bigger for paper solvers, who can easily circle each of them). The idea is that each starred entry has exactly two instances of each letter … except one. If you highlight each of those left-over letters, they spell REMAINDERS (reading top to bottom, left to right).

Beautiful PRIDE PARADE in Prague

I enjoyed Joel's programming challenge. My coding was completely hacky but wow was it satisfying to crack the problem and generate a list of workable entries.

When he told me what he was looking for, I wondered how this concept would resonate with solvers. It took too long to see that the R in HIPPOCRATIC OATH was the leftover, and that was the case going all the way down. I do think it's a novel, interesting idea — and REMAINDERS is appropriate — but I fear that some solvers won't go back after filling in the last box.

I was amazed to see this is a 134-word puzzle, as Sunday grids at that level are almost always splattered with ugly swaths of crossword glue to hold them together. I breezed through the puzzle, hardly noticing the usual suspects like HOW I because they were rare. And to come across so many great entries — FAULT LINES, SPEECH BUBBLES, UP TO YOU, SAUTE PAN, NICOTINE PATCH — I really didn't need any theme in order to enjoy all the snazzy fill. Since I didn't have a way to circle the leftover letters in the theme, I just treated the puzzle like it was a big themeless, and I really enjoyed that.

Joel was wise to put all his long fill in the vertical direction, all spread out through the grid. More spacing = more filling flexibility. People would be wise to study this sort of layout.

I'm guessing that I would have given this the POW! if I had solved it on paper, circling the leftover letters as I went.

Jim Horne notes:

Patrick Berry had a similar puzzle in 2007 where the undoubled letters spelled LEFTOVERS.

1
B
2
U
3
T
4
T
5
F
6
E
7
S
8
S
9
H
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A
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D
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J
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C
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E
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S
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A
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R
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S
T
O
I
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C
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E
Q
U
I
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O
R
E
O
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A
M
P
L
E
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C
R
E
P
E
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A
U
N
T
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H
I
P
S
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L
I
E
U
P
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H
I
P
P
O
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C
R
A
T
I
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C
O
A
T
H
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C
R
E
M
E
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O
L
A
Y
32
A
S
T
A
N
A
33
H
U
34
L
U
35
C
N
N
36
O
L
D
37
G
R
O
I
N
38
S
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H
40
E
S
A
L
L
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T
H
A
T
42
L
O
S
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A
L
A
M
O
S
44
T
I
M
45
C
A
R
B
46
G
U
T
E
N
47
M
I
M
O
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S
49
A
50
T
A
U
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N
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T
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C
54
N
E
T
55
S
O
L
56
B
A
R
57
M
E
M
B
E
R
58
P
R
I
D
E
59
P
60
A
61
R
A
D
E
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A
D
D
E
D
63
B
W
I
64
H
I
C
65
L
U
A
U
S
66
U
N
I
O
N
67
L
I
P
68
I
M
O
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F
O
R
I
T
70
U
N
D
E
R
D
71
U
72
R
E
S
S
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S
E
T
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S
A
D
A
T
E
75
P
I
S
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P
U
S
H
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H
A
I
K
U
78
S
T
P
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A
T
S
80
S
81
M
82
I
L
E
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N
I
L
84
E
85
A
N
O
86
M
I
A
M
I
D
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A
88
D
89
E
90
P
91
R
E
T
T
Y
92
P
93
E
N
N
Y
94
O
P
C
I
T
95
C
O
L
96
R
E
P
97
L
E
A
N
98
O
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I
L
P
A
N
100
H
O
W
I
101
A
S
A
102
M
I
103
G
O
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E
105
S
U
N
D
E
R
G
106
R
O
U
N
D
107
G
E
T
I
N
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O
K
R
A
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B
O
D
E
110
A
P
P
L
E
111
U
N
C
L
E
112
D
I
A
L
113
A
V
O
N
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D
O
L
O
R
115
E
T
H
O
S
116
A
S
S
T
117
D
A
N
A
118
N
E
W
S
© 2016, The New York TimesNo. 0320 ( 24,239 )
Across
1
Joke's target : BUTT
5
Own (up) : FESS
9
One of the Five Pillars of Islam : HADJ
13
French film award : CESAR
18
Phlegmatic : STOIC
20
Prefix with distant : EQUI
21
Black-and-white, in sneaker lingo : OREO
22
More than enough : AMPLE
23
Folded food : CREPE
24
111-Across's partner : AUNT
25
They "don't lie," in a #1 Shakira hit : HIPS
26
Not be able to sleep : LIEUP
27
*Doctor's orders? : HIPPOCRATICOATH
30
___ fraîche : CREME
31
Regenerist brand : OLAY
32
Capital of Kazakhstan : ASTANA
33
Streaming video giant : HULU
35
"Fareed Zakaria GPS" airer : CNN
36
Up in years : OLD
37
___ pull (sports injury) : GROIN
38
*1999 rom-com based on Shaw's "Pygmalion" : SHESALLTHAT
42
*Manhattan Project site : LOSALAMOS
44
Cook in charge of 110-Across : TIM
45
Engine part, briefly : CARB
46
"___ Tag!" : GUTEN
47
Drink served in a flute : MIMOSA
50
Razz : TAUNT
53
Popular tech review site : CNET
55
Money of Peru : SOL
56
*Lawyer : BARMEMBER
58
*Event with rainbow flags : PRIDEPARADE
62
Went on to say : ADDED
63
Caribbean area, once: Abbr. : BWI
64
___ jacet (phrase on tombstones) : HIC
65
Often-torchlit events : LUAUS
66
Requirement for one going into labor? : UNION
67
Impudence : LIP
68
"Speaking personally ...," in texts : IMO
69
Supporting the idea : FORIT
70
*Pressured : UNDERDURESS
73
*Makes wedding plans : SETSADATE
75
Geometry textbook symbols : PIS
76
Big fund-raising effort : PUSH
77
One-stanza poem : HAIKU
78
Green day? : STPATS
80
Expression in a toothpaste ad : SMILE
83
Shade of blue or green : NILE
85
"Feliz ___ Nuevo!" : ANO
86
*County that includes much of Everglades National Park : MIAMIDADE
90
*Tidy sum : PRETTYPENNY
94
Relative of ibid. : OPCIT
95
Newspaper unit: Abbr. : COL
96
What they say about you, informally : REP
97
Ectomorphic : LEAN
98
Car collector? : OILPAN
100
"That's just ___ roll" : HOWI
101
"Same here" : ASAMI
103
*Hides out : GOESUNDERGROUND
107
Arrive : GETIN
108
South side? : OKRA
109
Portend : BODE
110
See 44-Across : APPLE
111
See 24-Across : UNCLE
112
Face with numbers : DIAL
113
Skin So Soft maker : AVON
114
Sadness : DOLOR
115
Cultural values : ETHOS
116
Kind of prof. : ASST
117
Agent Scully on "The X-Files" : DANA
118
"___ to me" : NEWS
Down
1
Wharton, e.g., informally : BSCHOOL
2
Maurice who painted Parisian street scenes : UTRILLO
3
Grippers for geckos : TOEPADS
4
At risk of capsizing : TIPPY
5
Scary : FEARSOME
6
Math term that uses all five vowels exactly once : EQUATION
7
Things taken home from the beach? : SUNTANS
8
Protest type : SITIN
9
Deep laugh : HOHO
10
Lavish Vegas casino opened in 2009 : ARIA
11
Lowest part : DEPTHS
12
Book before Judges : JOSHUA
13
Deliberate : CALCULATED
14
Robe-wearing ruler : EMIR
15
Certain balloons : SPEECHBUBBLES
16
Smith graduate, e.g. : ALUMNA
17
Start on a righteous path : REPENT
19
CNBC interviewee, maybe : CEO
28
Ring figure? : CARAT
29
Old Spanish kingdom : CASTILE
34
Cousin of inc. : LLC
37
Muscle strengthened by a StairMaster, informally : GLUTE
39
"That guy?" : HIM
40
My Chemical Romance and others : EMOBANDS
41
Mine transport : TRAM
43
Up in years : AGED
47
Chat room policers, informally : MODS
48
___ Hawkins dance : SADIE
49
Spirit : ARDOR
51
Fairly recent : NEWISH
52
Some game show prizes : TRIPS
53
Peninsula in 2014 headlines : CRIMEA
54
Quitting aid, of sorts : NICOTINEPATCH
55
Relative of a skillet : SAUTEPAN
57
Fix : MEND
58
Band with a Ben & Jerry's flavor named for it : PHISH
59
Trudge : PLOD
60
Glows : AURAS
61
"Something to Talk About" singer, 1991 : RAITT
66
Sports teams wear them, informally : UNIS
69
Dangerous rifts : FAULTLINES
70
"I could go with whatever" : UPTOYOU
71
Like Mount Rushmore at night : UPLIT
72
Kicked oneself over : RUED
74
"S.N.L." bit : SKIT
79
Country singer Lee ___ Womack : ANN
80
Nursed : SIPPEDON
81
1990s craze : MACARENA
82
Chatting online with, for short : IMING
84
Bedroom shutter? : EYE
86
Ukraine neighbor : MOLDOVA
87
Some : ACOUPLE
88
Secrecy, with "the" : DOWNLOW
89
Those saying "somethin'," say : ELIDERS
90
Capital that's home to the world's largest castle, per Guinness : PRAGUE
91
Take umbrage at : RESENT
92
Multistory temple : PAGODA
93
Small-capped mushrooms : ENOKIS
99
Out of favor : INBAD
100
Motorcyclist's invitation : HOPON
102
Hero of kid-lit's "The Phantom Tollbooth" : MILO
104
Ballpark figs. : ERAS
105
Part of the "everything" in an everything bagel : SALT
106
"Super cool!" : RAD

Answer summary: 10 unique to this puzzle, 5 debuted here and reused later.

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