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New York Times, Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Author:
Jay Kaskel and Daniel Kantor
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
104/9/200810/30/20175
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
0243010
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.58030
Jay Kaskel
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
118/7/20079/27/20185
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
0036110
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.60030
Daniel Kantor

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 78, Blocks: 38 Missing: {FJQVWXZ} Spans: 1 This is puzzle # 7 for Mr. Kaskel. This is puzzle # 9 for Mr. Kantor. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Constructor notes:
JAY: This puzzle is the fourth collaboration between Dan Kantor and myself, and as it just so happens, the third that has a restaurant ... read more

JAY: This puzzle is the fourth collaboration between Dan Kantor and myself, and as it just so happens, the third that has a restaurant and/or food theme. My last solo puzzle had a dairy theme, and the next collaboration we have scheduled to run is—spoiler alert— food related as well.

In the case of PULLED PORK, I don't know that we consciously set out to do another food themed puzzle or that we started with the words "pulled pork." I think the idea came more from wanting to construct a puzzle where a particular word's letters were stretched, broken, split or pulled apart.

I will say that each time we receive payment for one of our collaborations, we use the money to have a nice dinner out with our wives. And now that the NYT has raised the price it pays constructors, we can even splurge a bit. At any rate, I'm suddenly hungry.

Jeff Chen notes:
Nice idea here, PORK pulled so that it stretches through the theme answers. Jay and Daniel had to find phrases that 1.) start with P, ... read more

Nice idea here, PORK pulled so that it stretches through the theme answers. Jay and Daniel had to find phrases that 1.) start with P, 2.) end with K, and 3.) space out O and R, but there are many options out there considering the freedom in where you place the O and R. I thought PLYMOUTH ROCK was a really good one, and PUSH YOUR LUCK was pretty good. (Not having DON'T in front of PUSH YOUR LUCK felt a bit odd.)

On the lookout for bugs ... Bugs Meany, that is

Not a huge fan of PIN ONES EARS BACK or PHONE PRANK, though. I had to look up the former, and it does seem legit, but I doubt I'd personally ever use it in writing or conversation. And PRANK CALL is so much more awesome than PHONE PRANK, which feels a bit dictionary-ish. Finally, mixing YOUR and ONES felt inelegant. Typically Will prefers the ONES usage to YOUR in these types of phrases, but PUSH ONES LUCK would have missed the R in PORK.

Hilarious SOS clue. [Message spelled out in coconuts, maybe] brought me back to my days of watching Gilligan's Island. Anyone remember the time when astronauts were going to pass over the island and the castaways formed SOS out of logs, only to have Gilligan mess things up so they spelled SOL? Sure was nice for Sol, one of the astronauts ... not so much for any potential rescue. Gilligan!

Also enjoyed getting MEANY in the grid, although it's because I've been reading "Encyclopedia Brown" to my nephew. Bugs MEANY makes for such a classic bad guy.

Not an easy layout, with five longish theme answers. Not a surprise to see some gluey entries pop up throughout. I usually try to stay away from OH TO (awkward plural) and SMIT (anything requiring "old-style" in the clue). Considering the repetitiveness of the circled letters, perhaps four themers would have been better, allowing for cleaner fill.

On that note, after getting the first two themers, it was automatic to fill in the circles in the last two themers — a bit anticlimatic. Would have been nice to get more variety. Pulled RANK, AWAY, OUT maybe?

1
L
2
O
3
I
4
N
5
S
6
S
7
M
8
I
9
T
10
S
11
C
12
A
13
T
14
A
S
C
O
T
15
T
E
A
S
16
O
H
T
O
17
P
H
O
N
E
18
P
R
A
N
K
19
C
O
O
P
20
P
A
N
21
P
E
O
N
22
C
A
R
N
E
23
P
U
S
H
Y
24
O
25
U
R
L
U
C
K
26
A
27
P
28
R
O
P
O
S
29
N
B
A
30
S
E
A
31
M
O
A
B
32
G
E
E
S
33
E
34
P
I
N
O
35
N
36
E
37
S
E
A
R
S
B
38
A
39
C
40
K
41
Y
A
C
H
T
42
O
L
E
O
43
S
44
O
45
B
46
B
R
O
47
O
48
R
49
I
O
L
E
S
50
P
L
Y
51
M
O
U
T
52
H
R
O
C
K
53
A
D
L
I
B
54
U
E
L
E
55
S
56
O
57
S
58
S
H
I
N
59
P
60
U
L
L
E
D
61
P
O
R
K
62
M
A
N
O
63
I
N
K
S
64
I
L
L
B
E
65
S
T
E
T
66
N
O
S
E
67
N
O
O
S
E
© 2015, The New York TimesNo. 0811 ( 24,017 )
Across
1. Butchers' cuts : LOINS
6. Goo-goo-eyed, old-style : SMIT
10. "Shoo-be-doo-be-doo-wop," e.g. : SCAT
14. Fancy tie : ASCOT
15. Ones steeped in tradition in England? : TEAS
16. "___ be in England" (Browning line) : OHTO
17. Frequent Bart Simpson antic : PHONEPRANK
19. Chicken condo? : COOP
20. Critique scathingly : PAN
21. Lowly worker : PEON
22. Chili con ___ : CARNE
23. Ask the boss for more vacation time after getting a raise, perhaps : PUSHYOURLUCK
26. Befitting : APROPOS
29. Org. for "King James" : NBA
30. "Finding Nemo" setting : SEA
31. Biblical kingdom or its Utah namesake : MOAB
32. Birds flying in a V formation : GEESE
34. Scold a person : PINONESEARSBACK
41. Millionaire's vessel : YACHT
42. I Can't Believe It's Not Butter! product : OLEO
43. [Oh, I can't go on!] : SOB
46. Frat guy : BRO
47. Camden Yards team : ORIOLES
50. Landmark with the year 1620 inscribed on it : PLYMOUTHROCK
53. Depart from the prepared text : ADLIB
54. River to the Ubangi : UELE
55. Message spelled out with coconuts, maybe : SOS
58. Where the tibia is : SHIN
59. Messy sandwich filler ... or a hint to this puzzle's circled letters : PULLEDPORK
62. Hand: Sp. : MANO
63. Color printer purchases : INKS
64. "Well, ___!" : ILLBE
65. Editor's "On second thought" : STET
66. Prominent part of a Groucho disguise : NOSE
67. What "N" is for, in a Sue Grafton title : NOOSE
Down
1. Reindeer herder : LAPP
2. Sweatshop regulator, for short : OSHA
3. iPad screen feature : ICON
4. Vote in France : NON
5. Meet a challenge, say : STEPUP
6. Classic beer once brewed in Detroit : STROHS
7. Ogre : MEANY
8. Fleming who created 007 : IAN
9. "For shame!" : TSK
10. San Diego setting, informally : SOCAL
11. "How does it feel ...," in Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone" : CHORUS
12. In a New York minute : ATONCE
13. Kansas city : TOPEKA
18. Mexican money : PESO
22. Unrefined : CRASS
23. N'awlins sandwich : POBOY
24. Prime draft classification : ONEA
25. Modern alternative to a taxi : UBER
26. Bit of band equipment : AMP
27. Roast pig side dish : POI
28. Oversaw : RAN
32. Word cried before "on it" or "lost" : GET
33. iPad reading : EBOOK
35. "Nattering" sort in a Spiro Agnew speech : NABOB
36. Off-white shade : ECRU
37. Opportunity : SHOT
38. Tide competitor : ALL
39. ___-Lo Green, former coach on "The Voice" : CEE
40. Sends to the canvas, for short : KOS
43. Sudden contractions : SPASMS
44. So yesterday : OLDHAT
45. Writer's credit : BYLINE
47. Open-ended threat : ORELSE
48. Part of Hollywood? : ROLE
49. Stranded during the winter, say : ICEDIN
51. North Dakota city with a nearby Air Force base : MINOT
52. Some inveterate users of steroids : HULKS
55. Go it alone : SOLO
56. Balls : ORBS
57. ___-Ball : SKEE
59. A.T.M. requirement : PIN
60. "___ momento" : UNO
61. Mahmoud Abbas's grp. : PLO

Answer summary: 3 unique to this puzzle, 2 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

Found bugs or have suggestions?