It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.
This web browser is not supported. Use Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or Edge for best results.

New York Times, Saturday, June 17, 2017

Author:
Ryan McCarty
Editor:
Will Shortz
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
106/17/20174/5/20191
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
0000127
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.58000
Ryan McCarty

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 64, Blocks: 30 Missing: {FJX} Spans: 1 This is the debut puzzle for Mr. McCarty. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Ryan McCarty notes:
I'm very humbled and excited to be debuting in the New York Times, especially on my favorite crossword day of the week - Saturday! I'm ... read more

I'm very humbled and excited to be debuting in the New York Times, especially on my favorite crossword day of the week - Saturday! I'm a relatively recent graduate of Princeton University where I studied Music and Computer Science, and I currently work as a technology consultant onsite at the SEC in DC. I'm also an avid singer (baritone), composer (mostly choral music), and music snob (currently a lot of Roomful of Teeth and future bass.)

I began doing New York Time crosswords at breakfasts in college with some friends and quickly got addicted. Soon after I began trying to construct some of my own puzzles – I found the process had a lot of similarities to what I was studying at school with music composition and coding (I'll let y'all imagine why.)

My fiancé and I had been singing along with "The Schuyler Sisters" from the Hamilton soundtrack multiple times in a row one night when I thought it'd be a fun idea to use Angelica, Eliza, (and Peggy) in a new puzzle. I crossed SCHUYLER SISTERS with ELLIE KEMPER, a fellow Princetonian, and set off from there. I'm happy that I was able to reference several strong women and people of color, including Ta-Nehisi Coates, whose "Between the World and Me" I coincidentally started reading last week.

I'm proud to say that I made this puzzle completely by hand, which was a fun exercise. It took a long time to construct, but definitely made the whole experience much more palpable.

Lastly, I want to give a special shout out to Ariana & Drew whose wedding I'll be celebrating today! This puzzle is dedicated to them!

Jeff Chen notes:
It used to be that most every themeless puzzle was a standard 'four sets of stacks, one in each corner.' I like the recent push toward ... read more

It used to be that most every themeless puzzle was a standard "four sets of stacks, one in each corner." I like the recent push toward big, open middles. Something cool about that swath of white space smack dab in the center. DEERSTALKER was my favorite long entry through there, as I'm a huge Holmes fan. I couldn't remember SILVER ARROW off the top, but what a neat brand name.

And what a way to debut! Making these types of wide-open middles is hard enough with some computer assistance here and there — to do it by hand is daunting.

I've seen all of "The Office" and two seasons of "The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," but I couldn't remember ELLIE KEMPER's name. Rats! I wonder if it would be different if the latter show had been on a major network instead of Netflix-only.

Two years ago at the ACPT, people started talking (gushing, actually) about "Hamilton." This dummy had no idea what they were talking about, but I sure do now. Even the SCHUYLER SISTERS rings a bell now (although I still don't know exactly who they are). Amazing how "Hamilton" has exploded. I often don't care for proper names that you either know or you don't, but if they're huge enough in pop culture, they're fair game.

Sara TEASDALE was tough for me to piece together — thank goodness I'm a huge "Music Man" fan (LIDA ROSE is a classic for me). But I wonder if that crossing might trip up a good chunk of solvers. I could see the case for calling that an unfair crossing.

I'm also a huge fan of Norse mythology, so RAGNAROK was a gimme for me. Thank goodness it didn't cross EDERLE though — the exact spelling (for both of them!) is tough to remember.

Along with OTARU and ANTOINE, that is a ton of tough proper names. I don't mind when a puzzle has a lot of proper names. It's when many of them could be called esoteric that it starts to feel like too much.

And QUINTE, SEMIBREVE … that makes for a lot of learning and education in one puzzle.

Thank goodness that this puzzle ran on a Saturday, the toughest day of the week. A lot of stuff I didn't know, a lot of learning I did along the way, a good educational experience. And a huge relief to have solved it correctly. I didn't have high confidence that Mr. Happy Pencil would appear.

Impressive to debut this way — wide-open middles are so tough to construct. I'm looking forward to seeing what Ryan can do with the assistance of some modern tools.

1
P
2
E
3
S
4
T
5
L
6
E
7
B
8
E
9
A
10
T
11
I
12
T
13
A
N
T
O
I
N
14
E
15
A
V
E
E
N
O
16
S
T
R
U
D
E
L
17
S
18
B
E
R
A
T
E
19
T
I
E
R
S
20
L
I
21
D
A
R
O
S
E
22
I
R
A
N
23
T
I
L
E
R
S
24
D
R
25
S
26
S
E
M
I
27
B
R
E
V
E
28
O
29
T
A
R
U
30
Q
U
A
K
E
R
31
S
32
E
L
O
N
33
S
34
C
35
H
U
Y
L
E
R
S
I
36
S
T
E
R
S
37
I
L
I
E
38
A
M
A
T
E
U
R
39
T
E
S
T
40
S
41
P
R
A
G
M
A
42
T
43
I
44
C
45
Z
A
P
46
E
47
D
E
R
L
E
48
H
O
M
O
49
R
A
50
G
N
A
R
O
K
51
B
E
R
R
A
52
I
O
N
I
A
N
53
W
E
54
M
A
D
E
I
T
55
Q
U
I
N
T
E
56
R
A
T
R
A
C
E
57
S
T
A
S
E
S
58
D
E
A
T
H
S
© 2017, The New York TimesNo. 0617 ( 24,693 )
Across
1
Meal maker? : PESTLE
7
"Vamoose!" : BEATIT
13
Fats Domino's real first name : ANTOINE
15
Skin-care brand : AVEENO
16
Austrian treats : STRUDELS
18
Put down hard : BERATE
19
Rows : TIERS
20
Barbershop staple from "The Music Man" : LIDAROSE
22
Shiraz setting : IRAN
23
Ones putting down quadrels : TILERS
24
Practice composition?: Abbr. : DRS
26
Whole note, to a Brit : SEMIBREVE
28
Port on Ishikari Bay : OTARU
30
Friends : QUAKERS
32
SpaceX head Musk : ELON
33
Sibling trio in "Hamilton" : SCHUYLERSISTERS
37
"Would ___?" : ILIE
38
One might be a "n00b" : AMATEUR
39
Dry runs, e.g. : TESTS
41
Commonsensical : PRAGMATIC
45
Cartoon word often seen with a lightning bolt : ZAP
46
Channel swimmer Gertrude : EDERLE
48
___ floresiensis (extinct "hobbit") : HOMO
49
Day of doom, in Scandinavian mythology : RAGNAROK
51
"It's déjà vu all over again" speaker : BERRA
52
Sea seen from Ithaca : IONIAN
53
Destination proclamation : WEMADEIT
55
Fifth of eight parrying positions in fencing : QUINTE
56
Wearying work schedule : RATRACE
57
Equilibria : STASES
58
Call of Duty tally : DEATHS
Down
1
French anise-flavored liqueur : PASTIS
2
Uncut : ENTIRE
3
Flow : STREAM
4
Flow stopper, of a sort : TOURNIQUET
5
Preserves covers? : LIDS
6
Memphis-to-Nashville dir. : ENE
7
Big character in children's literature : BABAR
8
Very much : EVERSO
9
Lead-in to méxico : AERO
10
Poet Sara who wrote "I Shall Not Care" : TEASDALE
11
Shaking like a leaf, maybe : INTERROR
12
Runner's ___ (marathoner's woe) : TOE
14
Title actress on Netflix's "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" : ELLIEKEMPER
17
Early Mercedes-Benz racing car : SILVERARROW
21
Part of Sherlock Holmes's attire : DEERSTALKER
23
Part of a merry refrain : TRALA
25
Goes for the bronze? : SUNS
27
Believe : BUY
29
Some pyramids, though not the ones at Giza : TETRAHEDRA
31
Drawn-out campaign : SIEGE
33
___ bath : SITZ
34
Leave en masse : CLEAROUT
35
Historical name of the Iberian Peninsula : HISPANIA
36
Kakuro calculation : SUM
40
Group of 100 people : SENATE
42
Bothered terribly : TOREAT
43
"Jackpot!" : IMRICH
44
Ta-Nehisi who wrote the best seller "Between the World and Me" : COATES
47
Builders of the original Legoland : DANES
50
Generates, with "up" : GINS
51
Reduce in force or intensity : BATE
52
They're high at M.I.T. and Stanford : IQS
54
About to explode : MAD

Answer summary: 4 unique to this puzzle, 1 debuted here and reused later, 4 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

Found bugs or have suggestions?