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New York Times, Saturday, April 23, 2016

Author: Paolo Pasco
Editor: Will Shortz
Paolo Pasco
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
107/17/20159/11/20172
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1200043
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.62010

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 72, Blocks: 29 Missing: {JK} This is puzzle # 3 for Mr. Pasco. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Paolo Pasco notes: I think this puzzle may have been the first to benefit from my 'seed list,' an extensive list on my phone containing entries that I ... more
Paolo Pasco notes:

I think this puzzle may have been the first to benefit from my "seed list," an extensive list on my phone containing entries that I think would be cool to put in a puzzle (alphabetized and sorted by length, because when it comes to crossword obsessiveness, it's go big or go home). 1A, 9A, 64A, 10D, and a handful of other entries came from that list. Unfortunately, the primary seed entry (RAGE QUIT) would end up being scooped two times before publication, but whatchagonnado.

Some scattershot points of interest:

  • As usual, Will, Joel and the rest of the team made some fantastic edits to the clues. My favorites are those for 46D, 60D, and especially 28D, among others.
  • Unless the entry gets scooped within the week before this puzzle's publication, this is the New York Times debut for TUMBLR! Compare that to the crossword performance of REDDIT (Appeared in the NYT 3 times) or TWITTER (Clued in NYT as the website 6 times). It's okay, Tumblr, you consonant-heavy website, you. We still love ya.
  • Sweet Fancy Moses, my ELAINE clue made it through without changes! As an avid "Seinfeld" fan, being able to reference one of the all-time best TV moments was a real… kick.

That's all from me. Hope you enjoyed the puzzle!

Jeff Chen notes: Paolo is one of my favorite rising stars in crosswordland, mostly doing themelesses but also showing some early-week range. One of ... more
Jeff Chen notes:

Paolo is one of my favorite rising stars in crosswordland, mostly doing themelesses but also showing some early-week range. One of the millennials (or younger?), he does a great job of capturing the flavor of his generation. It's so tough to make your shortish entries sing, but I was pleasantly surprised to uncover TUMBLR. I only vaguely know what that is, but Paolo did a nice job making sure that each crossing made it gettable. RAGE QUIT is another prime example.

That's my kind of home remedy! Let's just add in some whiskey ...

Ah, RAGE QUIT. Byron Walden once told me that he avoids putting marquee answers at 1-Across. I thought that was odd--wouldn't you want to highlight your great entries? But I've gradually come to see his point. Today, RAGE QUIT headlines the puzzle … but as Paolo points out, it's been in the NYT puzzle twice already in the past 12 months. I usually don't mind repetition, as it'll naturally occur, but there's something about RAGE QUIT that makes it less fun to see over and over. Perhaps because it seems like such a specialized term? Or how angry it sounds?

But back to the great stuff. Paolo takes nice advantage of his long slots, giving us the colorful YOU HEARD ME, TAX EVASION, RAN RAMPANT, GINGER ALES as home remedies (for indigestion, motion sickness, etc.), and STARGAZE. Along with clever mid-length entries like GYM RAT and LA-Z-BOY, there's a ton of snazzy material packed in.

I might have included BROMANCE in the list of assets a few years ago, but it feels like it's losing its shine, similar to RAGE QUIT. It has shown up in the NYT crossword a lot now, so perhaps it's simple overexposure.

I also like the fortuitous crossing of DATA SET and STATS. Sure is fun to get those related answers crossing each other.

With just a smattering of the EDD (crossworthy or not?) and ESA (this stands for … what? Ah, European Space Agency), I'm impressed at how much solid material Paolo worked in without requiring much crossword glue.

1
R
2
A
3
G
4
E
5
Q
6
U
7
I
8
T
9
G
10
Y
11
M
12
R
13
A
14
T
15
O
H
I
D
U
N
N
O
16
S
O
R
E
L
Y
17
S
E
N
D
A
W
A
Y
18
T
U
M
B
L
R
19
S
A
G
20
D
E
C
O
21
R
22
H
E
S
S
E
23
I
D
E
24
S
25
D
A
T
A
26
S
E
T
27
R
O
28
T
29
N
A
F
T
A
30
R
31
U
32
M
33
O
34
H
A
R
A
35
S
36
S
T
A
R
37
G
A
Z
E
38
R
O
L
E
X
E
39
S
40
S
T
D
E
N
I
S
41
E
Y
E
L
E
V
E
42
L
43
S
M
E
R
S
H
44
M
A
S
45
V
E
G
A
46
S
47
E
S
A
48
R
A
R
E
B
I
49
T
50
E
M
51
M
52
A
53
T
54
O
55
G
A
S
56
L
A
T
H
57
E
58
P
A
S
59
A
R
A
B
I
60
A
61
M
A
R
S
62
B
A
R
S
63
L
A
Z
B
O
Y
64
B
R
O
M
A
N
C
E
65
E
L
A
I
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66
A
S
B
E
S
T
O
S
© 2016, The New York TimesNo. 0423 ( 24,273 )
Across Down
1. Give up out of frustration, in slang : RAGEQUIT
9. Person with pressing things to do? : GYMRAT
15. [Shrug] : OHIDUNNO
16. Very much : SORELY
17. Exile : SENDAWAY
18. Blogging site owned by Yahoo : TUMBLR
19. Lose support : SAG
20. Look inside : DECOR
22. "The Glass Bead Game" author : HESSE
23. 10/15, e.g. : IDES
25. Table material : DATASET
27. Garbage : ROT
29. Acronym in 1990s news : NAFTA
30. Ingredient in a Dark 'n' Stormy : RUM
33. 1936 novel family : OHARAS
36. Wander around Hollywood, maybe : STARGAZE
38. Banded status symbols : ROLEXES
40. Paris suburb that holds the tombs of numerous Fr. monarchs : STDENIS
41. Ideal height for some contact : EYELEVEL
43. Counterintelligence grp. in 007 novels : SMERSH
44. Partners of 58-Across : MAS
45. "CSI" setting : VEGAS
47. Intl. org. that was the first to land a probe on a comet (2014) : ESA
48. Cheese dish : RAREBIT
50. Novel character with "a comfortable home and happy disposition" : EMMA
53. Some party wear : TOGAS
56. Shop item : LATHE
58. Partners of 44-Across : PAS
59. "Aladdin" setting : ARABIA
61. Chocolaty treats introduced in 1932 : MARSBARS
63. Piece of den furniture : LAZBOY
64. Relationship in many a Seth Rogen film : BROMANCE
65. Sitcom character whose dancing is described as "a full-body dry heave" : ELAINE
66. Frowned-upon construction material : ASBESTOS
1. Portia de ___ (Ellen DeGeneres's wife) : ROSSI
2. In the future : AHEAD
3. Some home remedies : GINGERALES
4. Hall of fame on TV : EDD
5. Learning center : QUAD
6. Like all contestants on "The Bachelor" : UNWED
7. How soda may be sold : INACAN
8. Highlanders, e.g. : TOYOTAS
9. Astronomers' std. : GST
10. Parent's reproof : YOUHEARDME
11. Citi Field icon : MRMET
12. Winners at the Battle of Chickasaw Bayou, for short : REBS
13. "___ well" : ALLS
14. Pericles' domain, in Shakespeare : TYRE
21. Lots : RAFTS
24. The New Yorker cartoonist Edward : SOREL
26. Need for sabermetricians : STATS
28. Panama Papers revelation : TAXEVASION
30. Went unchecked : RANRAMPANT
31. Tomb Raider weaponry : UZIS
32. Go together : MESH
33. Self-described "Family City U.S.A." : OREM
34. College athlete wearing blue and gray : HOYA
35. End : SEVER
37. One of the 12 gifts of Christmas : GEESE
39. Jason of "How I Met Your Mother" : SEGEL
42. 1987 #1 hit with the lyric "Soy capitán, soy capitán" : LABAMBA
46. Things played on the floor : SITARS
48. Black hat wearer : RABBI
49. Pound : THROB
51. ___ Island, Fla. : MARCO
52. Yo-yos : ASSES
53. "The Twilight Zone" episode, usually : TALE
54. Like some arguments : ORAL
55. City captured during the Six-Day War : GAZA
57. "A Series of Unfortunate Events" villainess : ESME
60. Word that sounds like a letter of the alphabet that's not in it : AYE
62. Results of some four-year programs, for short : BAS

Answer summary: 5 unique to this puzzle, 3 debuted here and reused later, 1 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

Found bugs or have suggestions?