It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.

New York Times, Monday, November 10, 2014

Author: Bruce Haight
Editor: Will Shortz
Bruce Haight
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
311/3/201311/24/20172
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2995330
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.56022

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 78, Blocks: 38 Missing: none – this is a pangram. Spans: 2 This is puzzle # 7 for Mr. Haight. NYT links: Across Lite PDF

Support XWord Info

Donation Amount

XWord Info is only possible when people like you choose to support it through donations.

Donate to get access to XWord Info for a year.

Benefits vary by donation level. Thank you!

Bruce Haight notes: Not too surprisingly, this puzzle started with FUHGEDDABOUDIT, and I just needed to find three more entries that meant aboud the ... more
Bruce Haight notes: Not too surprisingly, this puzzle started with FUHGEDDABOUDIT, and I just needed to find three more entries that meant aboud the same thing. My initial impression was that I would need to use the FUHGEDABOUDIT (one D) spelling since that is the way it appeared in Daniel Kantor's NYT puzzle of 8/7/07 (unrelated theme). I had trouble finding another 13 letter theme entry, so I looked up FUHGEDABOUDIT and was happy to find that the "preferred" Wiktionary spelling has two D's! I wasn't familiar with the term "eye dialect" — a little embarrassing since I am an ophthalmologist — but apparently this is an "eye dialect" spelling based on colloquial or dialectal speech. I have to tell you this word-nerd stuff is really fascinating to me!

My first try at this puzzle had NINE entries that Will did not like — mostly plurals like SEPTS, CDRS, GRRS, and LSTS. My impression is that Will is not really enamored with plurals or abbreviations, so plural abbreviations might be a good thing to avoid when possible. This second try at filling the puzzle has slightly harder but more interesting words, and a lot less "glue." The only clue I was sorry to see on the editing floor was "trips the light fantastic" for DANCES at 46-Down — Wikipedia attributes that phrase to a Milton poem of 1645 and says it's been hackneyed since 1908, but NO WAY! I think it's a classic.

I don't remember starting with any desire to make my first pangram, but when I got down to just the northwest corner and all I needed was a J...

Will Shortz notes: The Monday to Thursday puzzles this week were used last Saturday at the 4th annual Arlington Puzzle Festival at the Arlington (Va.) ... more
Will Shortz notes: The Monday to Thursday puzzles this week were used last Saturday at the 4th annual Arlington Puzzle Festival at the Arlington (Va.) Public Library. During the past 12 months I've supplied unpublished Times puzzles for 12 events like this around the country — mostly for libraries or other nonprofit institutions. Crossword contests are happy affairs, and I'm happy to help.
Jeff Chen notes: 'Donnie Brasco' easily made it to my Tier 2 list of movies, and I remember struggling with the decision whether to elevate it to the ... more
Jeff Chen notes: "Donnie Brasco" easily made it to my Tier 2 list of movies, and I remember struggling with the decision whether to elevate it to the vaunted Tier 1. Loved, loved, loved FUHGEDDABOUDIT! It almost spoils the rest of the puzzle for me, since as soon as I uncovered it, I was off to Youtube, watching that clip roughly 143 times.

Strong theme answers, each of them ones I'd be happy to see in a themeless puzzle. I was hoping to see AINT GONNA HAPPEN or ARE YOU HIGH, but what are you going to do. Fuhgeddaboudit!

And what nice clean fill. As I solve puzzles, little ORTS or OLIO give me slight cringes as I go, but I had exactly zero of them today. I went back to evaluate afterward, and I was pleasantly surprised to see really nothing I'd personally avoid. Even the partial FOR A feels perfectly fine to me, since it can be clued to the plural of FORUM. This puzzle exemplifies the type of crossword gluelessness I like to see.

Back when I worked as a mechanical engineer, I'd tell people they could have two of the following three things: cheap, fast, high-quality. (There's a similar principle in macroeconomics called "The Unholy Trinity," which I'll just link to since it's bound to bore everyone except me and exactly one other person.) I'm working on a parallel concept for crossword fill: you can have two of the following three: clean short fill, Scrabbliness, and quality long fill. It's THE CROSSWORD UNHOLY TRINITY! Now, if someone could only figure out how to make a CUT above the rest.

Today, Bruce goes hog wild on the first two. I often worry when I see a lot of JQXZ letters, since these tend to compromise the "clean short fill" criteria, but he does great in these two categories, with nary a piece of crossword glue, and one each of the Big Four of Scrabbly letters (JQXZ). Ah, then the Impossible Trinity kicks in, the quality long fill going AWOL. I would have liked to see at least one pair of long down entries, perhaps by taking out the block between VEND and HIP TO, and its symmetrical partner. Or even extending 5D to seven letters — seven letter answers are harder to fill will sparkly stuff than 8+ letter entries, but it can be done.

Nice start to the week, four really fun themers, with a very clean fill. Off to watch that "Donnie Brasco" clip a few more (dozen) times.

JimH notes: I like the Across and Down comic for this one.
1
J
2
A
3
V
4
A
5
Q
6
U
7
E
8
S
9
T
10
S
11
T
12
U
13
B
14
A
V
E
R
15
U
N
D
U
E
16
T
A
R
O
17
D
O
N
T
18
M
A
K
E
M
E
19
L
A
U
G
H
20
E
N
D
21
A
K
I
N
22
U
T
T
E
R
23
E
V
E
N
24
I
25
D
L
E
26
F
27
U
28
H
G
E
D
D
29
A
B
O
U
D
30
I
31
T
32
O
N
I
O
N
33
L
E
I
S
34
C
O
35
G
36
R
I
P
S
37
T
38
W
I
X
T
39
P
I
T
A
40
A
F
T
41
G
R
A
B
42
H
O
N
E
Y
43
Y
O
44
U
R
E
K
I
45
D
46
D
I
N
G
M
E
47
N
I
K
E
48
R
A
N
G
49
S
50
T
51
R
I
P
52
B
A
N
D
53
F
54
Y
55
I
56
T
H
A
T
S
57
R
58
I
D
I
C
U
59
L
O
U
S
60
O
O
Z
E
61
I
N
A
N
E
62
U
R
A
L
63
P
R
E
S
64
A
B
Y
S
S
65
G
E
N
E
© 2014, The New York TimesNo. 1110 ( 23,743 )
Across Down
1. The "joe" of a cup of joe : JAVA
5. Knight's pursuit : QUEST
10. Leftover part of a ticket : STUB
14. Declare : AVER
15. Excessive : UNDUE
16. Poi plant : TARO
17. "No way!" : DONTMAKEMELAUGH
20. Finish : END
21. Similar (to) : AKIN
22. Say : UTTER
23. Tied : EVEN
24. Like a couch potato : IDLE
26. "No way!" : FUHGEDDABOUDIT
32. Popular satirical news source, with "The" : ONION
33. Maui mementos : LEIS
34. Gear tooth : COG
36. Makes cool, in a way, as jeans : RIPS
37. Between, poetically : TWIXT
39. Gyro bread : PITA
40. Sternward : AFT
41. Suddenly get the attention of : GRAB
42. Winnie-the-Pooh's favorite food : HONEY
43. "No way!" : YOUREKIDDINGME
47. Big name in sneakers : NIKE
48. Telephoned : RANG
49. Undress : STRIP
52. The Eagles or the Byrds : BAND
53. "Just a heads-up," on a memo : FYI
56. "No way!" : THATSRIDICULOUS
60. Move like sludge : OOZE
61. Foolish : INANE
62. Russia's ___ Mountains : URAL
63. Air Force One passenger: Abbr. : PRES
64. Bottomless pit : ABYSS
65. Heredity unit : GENE
1. Green stone : JADE
2. Stratford-upon-___ : AVON
3. Sell : VEND
4. The "A" of MoMA : ART
5. Trembled, as with fear : QUAKED
6. Grinchlike : UNKIND
7. Idyllic garden : EDEN
8. 15, for any row, column or diagonal here:
4 9 2
3 5 7
8 1 6
: SUM
9. Golf ball elevator : TEE
10. Said : STATED
11. Stretched tight : TAUT
12. Hankering : URGE
13. Physics Nobelist Niels : BOHR
18. Expert : MAVEN
19. Doozies : LULUS
23. Swelled heads : EGOS
24. Wild Alpine goat : IBEX
25. "Just ___" (47-Across slogan) : DOIT
26. ___ song (cheaply) : FORA
27. Bring together : UNIFY
28. Savvy about : HIPTO
29. "I couldn't have done it because ...," e.g. : ALIBI
30. Sweetest part of a cake, often : ICING
31. ___ pole : TOTEM
35. Marvin of Motown : GAYE
37. Long hike : TREK
38. What might give a water-skier trouble : WAKE
39. Video game with a paddle : PONG
41. Handlebar features : GRIPS
42. Gandhi, for one : HINDU
44. Marries : UNITES
45. Empties, as a bathtub : DRAINS
46. School functions with chaperones : DANCES
49. What a red light signifies : STOP
50. Norse god of war : THOR
51. Level, as with a wrecking ball : RAZE
52. Time to blow out the candles, for short : BDAY
53. "Look out!," to a golfer : FORE
54. Chinese money : YUAN
55. Archipelago component : ISLE
57. Narrow coastal inlet : RIA
58. Schubert's Symphony ___ Minor ("Unfinished Symphony") : INB
59. Haul : LUG

Answer summary: 2 unique to this puzzle, 1 unique to Shortz Era but used previously.

Found bugs or have suggestions?