It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker. Please consider supporting our site by purchasing an account.

New York Times, Thursday, October 13, 2016

Author: Don Gagliardo and Zhouqin Burnikel
Editor: Will Shortz
Don Gagliardo
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
1211/13/20129/19/201712
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
3151200
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.58131
Zhouqin Burnikel
TotalDebutLatestCollabs
5411/13/20126/4/201819
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
519155442
ScrabbleRebusCirclePangram
1.56281

This puzzle:

Rows: 15, Columns: 15 Words: 76, Blocks: 29 Missing: {JKQXZ} This is puzzle # 11 for Mr. Gagliardo. This is puzzle # 35 for Ms. Burnikel. NYT links: Across Lite PDF
Constructor notes: While doing a search, Don saw the phrase GARBAGE BAG, and noticed how the BAG was repeated in sequence and together in the ... more
Constructor notes:

While doing a search, Don saw the phrase GARBAGE BAG, and noticed how the BAG was repeated in sequence and together in the preceding word. Having already seen a similar phrase, it gave him hope that there would be more examples. Don asked Zhouqin to help in the search, and both came up with enough phrases to make it work. This was all completed before a similar puzzle was published in the NYT in May.

Jeff Chen notes: Some fun finds, phrases where one word is contained in the other. I'd seen ALE in PALE ALE and AVERAGE AGE used in a similar way ... more
Jeff Chen notes:

Some fun finds, phrases where one word is contained in the other. I'd seen ALE in PALE ALE and AVERAGE AGE used in a similar way before, but GARBAGE BAG and especially WHOOPIE PIE gave me a smile. I've never had a WHOOPIE PIE before, and I don't even know what it is, but hoo boy do I want one. What a great name.

I liked that Don and C.C. found so many themers, packing the grid with interesting wordplay. I didn't care for some as much as others, though. INSTANT TAN feels a little off to my ear — SPRAY TAN or FAKE TAN sounds better — and MADE MAD doesn't seem quite like a crossworthy entry.

Then there was EARTH ART. The Wikipedia article is titled as "Land art" (not that Wikipedia is a definitive source), and all the pictures of show a type of art I've never seen before. It was fascinating though, to get exposed to something I'd never experienced. Some of the art is amazing!

Pretty darn smooth grid, considering how many long entries Don and C.C. had to use in their fill. Since so many of their themers appear short in the grid (PALE ALE only takes up four spaces, for example), they had to rely on much more long fill than usual to stay under the 78-word maximum.

So many 7-letter entries, all around the corners — and pretty much all of them are solid to excellent! RAW BARS / ORIGAMI / STAN LEE / DNA TEST are all lively. They do rely on a tiny amount of crossword glue — OCS = officer candidate school, TNN = channel of the past, OEO = Office of Economic Opportunity — but it's all pretty minor and inconsequential. Well done.

Neat idea and solid execution. If all the themers had been as strong as WHOOPIE PIE, this would have been the POW! As it was, having so many themers, some which were a bit blah, sort of watered down the impact for me.

1
R
2
E
3
P
4
O
5
R
6
T
7
S
8
R
9
W
10
A
11
N
12
D
13
A
14
N
15
A
T
H
E
A
R
T
16
A
R
G
O
N
N
E
17
W
H
O
O
P
I
E
18
G
A
R
B
A
G
E
19
B
I
N
20
S
P
F
21
S
22
T
O
O
T
E
D
23
A
C
E
24
D
25
E
A
R
26
T
H
27
D
E
L
I
28
R
A
M
I
29
S
30
N
A
T
31
D
Y
S
O
N
32
S
L
E
E
P
33
Y
34
S
O
35
H
O
36
T
U
G
37
M
A
D
38
E
39
P
A
L
40
E
41
O
42
C
43
S
44
T
S
A
45
R
46
G
O
L
47
E
48
M
49
S
50
R
A
I
51
L
S
52
C
O
53
P
54
R
E
M
A
P
55
I
R
M
A
56
S
H
O
U
57
T
58
M
E
T
E
59
G
A
M
B
60
L
E
61
F
R
E
62
E
63
R
I
C
64
A
V
E
R
A
G
65
E
66
I
N
S
67
T
A
N
T
68
M
A
R
A
C
A
S
69
S
T
A
N
L
E
E
70
I
N
S
T
Y
L
E
71
T
H
U
N
D
E
R
© 2016, The New York TimesNo. 1013 ( 24,446 )
Across Down
1. Much police paperwork : REPORTS
8. From Kigali, e.g. : RWANDAN
15. Intrinsically : ATHEART
16. French locale of fierce W.W. I fighting : ARGONNE
17. Baked chocolaty treat : WHOOPIEPIE
18. Hefty item : GARBAGEBAG
19. Arabic name part : BIN
20. Nos. at the beach : SPFS
22. Blew one's horn : TOOTED
23. Crushed, as a test : ACED
25. Creative works utilizing the landscape : EARTHART
27. Supermarket section : DELI
28. "Caddyshack" director : RAMIS
30. D.C. pro : NAT
31. Cleaner brand : DYSON
32. Ready to retire : SLEEPY
34. Part of N.Y.C. once derisively called Hell's Hundred Acres : SOHO
36. Yank : TUG
37. Angered : MADEMAD
39. Draft choice : PALEALE
41. Ft. Benning training facility : OCS
44. Early 20th-century abdicator : TSAR
46. Magical creatures in Jewish folklore : GOLEMS
50. Tracks : RAILS
52. One who keeps the beat? : COP
54. Lay out differently, in a way : REMAP
55. "___ la Douce" (1963 film) : IRMA
56. Public recognition : SHOUTOUT
58. Apportion : METE
59. Roll the dice, so to speak : GAMBLE
61. Not in use : FREE
63. Ocasek of the Cars : RIC
64. About 25 years, for N.F.L. players : AVERAGEAGE
66. What a spray may provide : INSTANTTAN
68. Ones shaking to the music? : MARACAS
69. Comic legend : STANLEE
70. Chic : INSTYLE
71. N.B.A. team since 2008 : THUNDER
1. Places for oysters and clams : RAWBARS
2. On the up and up : ETHICAL
3. Basic linguistic unit : PHONEME
4. Antipoverty agcy. created under L.B.J. : OEO
5. Some performances at the Apollo : RAPS
6. Baloney : TRIPE
7. Two-time Wimbledon winner Edberg : STEFAN
8. Lively piano tune : RAG
9. One of the seven deadly sins : WRATH
10. Prefix with business : AGRO
11. Emily Dickinson, self-descriptively : NOBODY
12. Aid in genealogy : DNATEST
13. Poet who wrote "You may shoot me with your words, / You may cut me with your eyes" : ANGELOU
14. Bereft of : NEEDING
21. Sp. ladies : SRAS
24. Per ___ : DIEM
26. Corvette feature : TTOP
29. Old-fashioned fashion accessories : SPATS
31. Sorrowful state : DOLOR
33. Abbr. by a golf tee : YDS
35. Halloween costume : HAG
38. Per : EACH
40. ___ sch. : ELEM
41. Crane construction? : ORIGAMI
42. Vacation vehicle : CARAVAN
43. Keeps on low, say : SIMMERS
45. It may be slated : ROOF
47. ___ City (memorable film destination) : EMERALD
48. Something never seen at night : MATINEE
49. Spirit : SPECTER
51. Small test subject : LABRAT
53. Stickler : PURIST
56. "Love Story" novelist : SEGAL
57. First extra inning : TENTH
60. Like some tablecloths : LACY
62. He married two Hittites to the chagrin of his parents, in Genesis : ESAU
65. Suffix with legal : ESE
67. Channel that became Heartland in 2013 : TNN

Answer summary: 4 unique to this puzzle, 1 debuted here and reused later.

Found bugs or have suggestions?